Jump to content
travsformation

First 40+ km/h wipe-out

Recommended Posts

14 minutes ago, meepmeepmayer said:

Looks like this could have been much worse, but was mostly a good learning experience. Here's something for your translation skills: "Glück im Unglück" describes it pretty well:)

Hahaha I guess it was a "Glück im Unglück" :efee612b4b: (I admit I cheated; German is not among my language arsenal)

28 minutes ago, meepmeepmayer said:

Did you wear a motorcycle jacket or likewise abrasion protection?

Knee, elbow and wrist guards + the FF helmet. Have been considering a motorcycle jacket for a while, but don't fancy buying one online without trying it out first, and haven't found anything in nearby shops that suits my fancy (neon yellow isn't my style; a more discreet, black jacket with reflective elements is what I'm after).

I'd also like something for my fingers and knuckles. There seems to be no perfect solution for that aside from wearing gloves under one's wrist guards. I thought I'd found just what I was after with the Flatland3D Pro E-skate gloves (Full-finger gloves with Knox scaphoid protection + a wrist plate), but having discussed it in length with others, they don't seem to be a very good choice after all...

31 minutes ago, meepmeepmayer said:

I was wondering if it was just bad luck that stuff always happens in the one second you're not looking, but arrived at a really good explanation:

When riding, we constantly and automatically ride around all kinds of potential problems, and take precautionary choices like giving a wide berth to some unclear situation like a car door that might suddenly open, or relaxing the legs for some bump, etc. - just the automatic stuff. And when not paying attention, one simply hits the obstacles that one wouldn't even consciously notice otherwise, but that are always there.

But of course there's always bad luck involved...

Yeah, that rings very true. I'm guessing a lot of accidents occur because we have to be hyper-vigilant most of the time (cars, car doors, people, cyclists, dogs, etc.), which can be exhausting, so when there are no clear threats, we relax and...something as harmless (to other kinds of vehicles) as a speed bump or a pothole can send us flying....

And the, of course, there's bad luck...(and "Glück im Unglück", of course) ;)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, Mono said:

Yeah, speed bumps. And 44km/h. I don't know man, rather don't ask for being that lucky too often. This type of event makes you much more alert for a while, that's the good part, but when complacency kicks in again, I don't know, what's the plan to not make this happen again?

Good question.

30-35 km/h is an OK riding speed for me. I like having having the extra power for on-demand acceleration (overtaking, keeping up with cars in certain situations), and bought the 18XL more for the range and safety margin (preventing cut-outs) than to ride at speed.

But all the same, speed wasn't the decisive factor in this case, and usually isn't (in my particular case). As to my plan...I imagine I'll follow the loop you mentioned: crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency > crash > repeat :efee612b4b:

(and maybe upgrade my protection gear)

Edited by travsformation
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, travsformation said:

Am no longer limping and my shoulder is only slightly sore, so I consider myself pretty lucky (I fell in a straight line; I could have landed on the curb, slid into a parked car, etc.)

Wow! that sounded hairy. The ground really does come up fast to "greet" you doesn't it! Glad you're OK, mostly.

The reason I quoted you above is to refer you to my "The Next Two Seconds" concept

If you incorporate this concept into your riding, in theory you will never slide into a curb or parked (or moving) car, if you come off.  It's really not that difficult and takes no appreciable brain capacity.  It becomes automatic after a while.

Question: how far did you have to walk to retrieve the wheel?

 I guess this trip wont be going on the "I Had a Nice Ride Today" thread ;)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, travsformation said:

But all the same, speed wasn't the decisive factor in this case, and usually isn't. As to my plan...I imagine I'll follow the loop you mentioned: crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency > crash > repeat :efee612b4b:

:roflmao::cheers:

Oh yeah, your fingers were stinging because you gave the ground a good hard slap when you landed.  I had the same feeling 2 summers ago when I ate asphalt at a high speed.  But I wasn't going as fast as you so I had less details to remember  and 0.15 seconds more time to remember them in..

Edited by Smoother
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

The KS Gods were watching over you.

I'm guessing that would be Guanyin, Goddess of compassion and mercy :efee612b4b:

13 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

Put some ice on the bruised areas and ‘monitor’ the tingling in your fingers. A nerve from your shoulder to your hand could be inflamed or was possibly stretched from your accident. If your stomach allows take some anti- inflammatories such as ibuprofen.  Glad you were wearing protective gear and a back pack. 

Thanks! Pain has mostly subsided, and the tingling was gone by the next morning. It was on my left hand; the shoulder that took the hit was my right, so I'm guessing it was just from the friction. I imagine that when the elbow guard finished doing its job and my arm was fully extended, the backpack's friction started to overpower the sliding momentum and turned by body sideways, which is why I ended up with my left palm on the ground. As you said, good thing I was geared up! (And glad I was wearing a backpack, I'd never considered it as a "safety element" until now)

19 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

a speed adrenaline rush is hard to contain once released.  

You said it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Smoother said:

The reason I quoted you above is to refer you to my "The Next Two Seconds" concept

Cheers! Will check that out tomorrow, as it's my turn to make dinner today ;)

7 minutes ago, Smoother said:

It's really not that difficult and takes no appreciable brain capacity. 

Should I be reading into that? :P:efee612b4b:

7 minutes ago, Smoother said:

Question: how far did you have to walk to retrieve the wheel?

Hard to say, that was the last thing I was thinking about at the time :efef2e0fff: 

I'd say...about....4 metres? (although memory can be deceiving in these situations). I don't have a clue what the wheel did, but based on the damage to the side side pad, I'm guessing it went flying, landed on its side and the side pad stopped it in its tracks pretty quickly. I couldn't say how far the wheel was from the speed bump, but definitely a hell of a lot closer than I was :efee612b4b: (which is a good thing, in this case)

20 minutes ago, Smoother said:

I guess this trip wont be going on the "I Had a Nice Ride Today" thread ;)

:roflmao:

It could go in the "99% of my ride was fantastic" thread though! :D

Or with @meepmeepmayer's blessing, in a dedicated Glück im Unglück thread  ;):efee612b4b:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, travsformation said:

:roflmao:

It could go in the "99% of my ride was fantastic" thread though! :D

:D  Yeah...no.  Bit of a mixed message there

11 minutes ago, travsformation said:

Should I be reading into that? :P:efee612b4b:

Only you can answer that. But the mere fact that you thought enough to ask, suggests that you shouldn't.:clap3:

16 minutes ago, travsformation said:

I couldn't say how far the wheel was from the speed bump, but definitely a hell of a lot closer than I was :efee612b4b: (which is a good thing, in this case)

WOW, you were more than 4m from the bump? that was some flight/slide you had!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@travsformation I hope you are doing ok. 

Thanks for sharing your experience from the crash.

As much as I like avoid it, i know it is only a matter of time before I get into a simular situation. I rarely go riding without my wrist guard and helmet. It happens but only at low speeds and where I know road conditions. Picking up take away lunch at work. Anything more than 1km I am fully geared up 99.9% of the time.

The week after achard crash is when you start feeling what forces you have played with. 

Come to think of it my buttom landing crash, still leave very visual scar on my elbow. So 3/4 of a year later it still sjows, and itches from time to time. 

I hope you don't have any permanent scars or injury.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speedy recovery! Good you had no serious injuries. That's quite the speed to smack the pavement.

When I crashed I got up, picked up the V8, and rode home .... only to stop after 50 meters and I HAD to sit down or I would have fainted. 

And I agree there still is no perfect solution for gloves. We need integrated wrist guards, abrasion resistance and a system to avoid finger dislocations/fractures. But nothing out there yet, and motorcycle gloves are hard to put on under the wrist guards.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, travsformation said:

But all the same, speed wasn't the decisive factor in this case, and usually isn't (in my particular case). As to my plan...I imagine I'll follow the loop you mentioned: crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency > crash > repeat :efee612b4b:

(and maybe upgrade my protection gear)

It suspiciously looks like it wasn't a particularly scary experience then. I think I don't like the plan though. After any crash of which I get out unscaphed to some extend by luck, I personally try to change my behavior in order to minimize the risk to ever end up in the very same crash situation again. But then, I am a chicken and I have set my self-imposed hard speed limit to 25km/h.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

 I suspect every EUC rider will eventually get plastered from a speed bump :cry2:

true story

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for the record, out of the comfort zone doesn't necessary mean into the danger zone. I guess a basic rule of practicing any kind of sports is that it should never be in the danger zone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Mono said:

I guess a basic rule of practicing any kind of sports is that it should never be in the danger zone.

Unless of course you are blasting the Kenny Loggins track in your headphones! 😜

@travsformation:

Glad you fared well on your tumble! The hardest part about these incidents is not the physical healing, but the psychological! I've hit 26-28mph a few times since, and once resulted in a recovered wobble, but slowly getting more confident and (relaxed) at speed. It's almost like a rite of passage, that we have to experience the death wobble a few times to learn how to deal with it in a safe manner, entraining the muscles to react calmly and properly. I've almost been "wanting" to recreate the scenario, so I can try techniques to fix it. Seems on my last near death wobble, my mind willed it away. This was as I started to decelerate from 28mph. It began, and I was like, oh no, not again. Seems, I slowed time down somehow, looked down at my feet position, and noticed my left foot around an inch behind the level of my right. So I quickly adjusted and was able to nip it this time. Whew! 

 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Rama Douglas said:

This was as I started to decelerate from 28mph. It began, and I was like, oh no, not again. Seems, I slowed time down somehow, looked down at my feet position, and noticed my left foot around an inch behind the level of my right. So I quickly adjusted and was able to nip it this time. Whew! 

You re-positioned a foot above 20mph? and Lived!!!?? WOW. That's an instant face plant for me. respect!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/10/2019 at 7:08 PM, travsformation said:

Went out for a night ride the day before yesterday. I've become very fond of riding at night, when the city is completely deserted. It's nice to be able to focus on my riding and on progressively taming the 18XL. I still struggle a bit with things like accelerating on wide curves (large roundabouts, for example), and get speed wobbles, wobbles when accelerating hard, and when braking (except power braking).

I was out for a couple of hours, mostly practising hard acceleration, braking, carving and slaloming: I'm really starting to enjoy having to put my weight into it, it's very different from the V8, which I can just effortlessly "flick" from side to side. Also did some off-roading, which was great fun, as the paths I took are usually plagued with people walking their dogs, forcing me to limit my speed drastically. T'was fun to push the envelop and get high on the adrenaline :D

Sidenote:  @Marty Backe, I'm following your advice and using a flashlight for night-riding: the 18XL has a great headlight, but when accelerating, braking or on pitch black trails, it isn't enough. The flashlight works like a charm, and is a much simpler solution than the DIY inventions I tried to attach a bicycle light to the wheel or my helmet. I initially thought it would be tedious to be holding the flashlight all the time, but have grown used to it, and can easily turn it on or off depending on visibility, resting my arm. It also comes in handy when approaching an intersection: I put it on strobe mode to give drivers plenty of notice of my impending arrival before we cross paths, and so far, I'd say it's prevented several mishaps with cars ( @Smoother can attest to the fact those don't tend to end well...)

Anyway, before I go off on another tangent, mid-ride I took a break, and realised I could have unlocked the max. speed to 50 km/h several weeks ago. So, I unlocked it (had to try 3 different versions of the KS app...but that's a different story) and started leaving my "speed comfort zone" so I can gradually overcome the wobbles (they tend to start at about 35 km/h). I noticed that I instinctively grip the wheel when accelerating hard and when I reach a certain speed, so I worked on relaxing my stance. Had a few close calls (the kind of nasty wobbles that make you consider bailing), but managed to control them.

Then, on the last stretch before getting home, I pushed myself one last time, and....I was managing! Faster and faster, no wobbles, complete control of the wheel, feeling confident and....suddenly I'm airborne and sliding along the pavement. I was so focused on my riding and maintaining control of the wheel that I didn't even see the speed bump 100m (330 ft) from my house, which I ride past at least twice a day...I checked WheelLog, and since most the ride home was either off-road or accelerate-wobble-slow down, the trip's top speed (43,8 km/h) was, beyond a doubt, the speed I was going when I saluted the pavement.

It happened so fast I didn't even have time to think. I landed on my right side, and based on the scrape marks on my elbow guards (and lack thereof on my wrist guard), it appears my right wrist didn't even touch the ground and all my weight landed on my elbow (perfect recipe for a nasty shoulder injury). I'm glad I was wearing sturdy skateboard-style protections and not something like G-Form Pro-X's under my clothes, 'cause even with the skid plate and thick padding, the ol' elbow was sore for a while. Aside from that, I had some tingling in my left fingers, which scraped against the pavement (might consider getting some leather gloves...don't fancy road-rash...) and a nasty hit on my  lateral malleolus (bottom of the fibula). An odd place to take a hit...but a good argument for wearing high mountain boots when riding; loosely laced, to not hinder ankle movement, they do provide protection for a part of the body I'd never even considered might be affected in an EUC crash.

I rode away from the crash a bit shaken and with tingling fingers, but that's about it. It was the next day when I found myself limping and with a fairly sore shoulder (not a nice feeling when you've already dislocated that shoulder twice in the past). Gearing up saved the day. Inspecting my gear later, my helmet doesn't have a single scratch, but if my head had hit the ground, it would have been from the ear downward, so anything but a full-face helmet would have been as good as nothing at all. Looks like my backpack absorbed part of the hit too, as there's a tear on the side (if it hadn't been for the backpack, that would have been my side scraping against the asphalt). 

Am no longer limping and my shoulder is only slightly sore, so I consider myself pretty lucky (I fell in a straight line; I could have landed on the curb, slid into a parked car, etc.).

The 18XL got a couple of ugly scars, and I ripped the side pad in three different places (almost pulled it off entirely). The factory adhesive is strong stuff, just pressed on the pad for a few seconds and it stayed in place, so I reckon I'll order a replacement but leave it as is until it's beyond recovery.

I can't help but remember some advice given by @Mono, I think it was, on inattention being one of the no. 1 causes of EUC crashes. I was almost home (which is when we tend to pay less attention), the streets were deserted, there were no pedestrians, cars, dogs or other "mobile hazards", and due to excess focus on keeping the wheel stable at speed, I wasn't paying enough attention to the road in front of me. In retrospect, I'm glad this happened late at night and the obstacle was a speed bump and not a person (although I wouldn't have pushed my limits like that in any other circumstance; then again...you never really know when/where someone might jump out in front of you...)

On the other hand, since I moved recently, it took me a a while to locate and unbox my protective gear, so for a over a week, I'd been running errands on the wheel, on a daily basis, with no protections at all. Granted, I was extra cautious and didn't take any risks, but accidents can happen when you least expect it so...no more of that nonsense. If it hadn't been for protective gear, this would have been a nasty fall (although another small lesson I've learned is that no matter how much protection one wears, there's always going to be some part of the body that's unprotected, so I guess the risk of accidents and injuries is something one just has to accept the moment he hops on a one-wheeled fracture machine) :efee612b4b:

Over and out  :efee612b4b:

I'm glad you ok after all  ;)

I'm curious regarding the flash light please...

Tomorrow I'll receive my first wheel E+, there's no lights,and I'm going use the wheel mostly for commuting, any weather, nights as well...

I'm hardly thinking WHAT LIGHT  ;)

Could you tell me some more what flash light is you're using, are you hold it in your hand, or it's mounted?

I'm willing to get some ideas what light to buy, and what works best for safe riding.

Thank you  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rama Douglas said:

Unless of course you are blasting the Kenny Loggins track in your headphones! 😜

@travsformation:

Glad you fared well on your tumble! The hardest part about these incidents is not the physical healing, but the psychological! I've hit 26-28mph a few times since, and once resulted in a recovered wobble, but slowly getting more confident and (relaxed) at speed. It's almost like a rite of passage, that we have to experience the death wobble a few times to learn how to deal with it in a safe manner, entraining the muscles to react calmly and properly. I've almost been "wanting" to recreate the scenario, so I can try techniques to fix it. Seems on my last near death wobble, my mind willed it away. This was as I started to decelerate from 28mph. It began, and I was like, oh no, not again. Seems, I slowed time down somehow, looked down at my feet position, and noticed my left foot around an inch behind the level of my right. So I quickly adjusted and was able to nip it this time. Whew! 

 

Please do not go seeking the Death Wobble. A 'near death wobble'  is not the same thing.

I believe whether you recover from a true Death Wobble or not is to a large degree luck. So please, don't push your luck - I'd like to enjoy more rides with you :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Smoother said:

You re-positioned a foot above 20mph? and Lived!!!?? WOW. That's an instant face plant for me. respect!

It was either that or go down with the ship! And my mind said, oh no you don't and ol Betsy responded...🧙‍♂️

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...