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travsformation

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About travsformation

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  • Birthday November 21

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    Barcelona, Spain

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  1. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    BTW, I couldn't help but laugh at this comment. Not sure whether that was a typo and you actually wanted to say detailed, or it was intentional, but made me laugh all the same
  2. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    hahahaa That made my day! I would like to make one correction, one clarification and one request though: Correction: In my defence, and as you mentioned in another post, on late-night rides, the sub humans come out of hiding. Any chance you could replace Mr. Average Driver with Sub-human or Homicidal driver? Then I'll definitely be framing this and hanging it on the wall! Clarification: That poor speed bump had done nothing at all to me... I'm the one who pounced on it with no warning! Request: May I get another certificate for my contributions to the EUC community in the form of lengthiest compendium of ramblings / "Holy Walls of Text"?
  3. travsformation

    Is the rider jacket really necessary?

    Couldn't agree more! 👍
  4. travsformation

    Is the rider jacket really necessary?

    I do see the benefit of M/C jackets, particularly in terms of abrasion protection (the only parts that are protected between by hip and my neck are my elbows and wrists). But when trying on M/C jackets, I immediately had doubts about whether they'd actually be useful for EUC-riding. On one hand, I'm not too sure the "sliding capabilities" of a M/C jacket can be compared to a hard plastic skid plate. They're designed for higher speed crashes, and I have a feeling (this is just speculation so correct me if I'm wrong) a jacket would offer more friction resistance than a plastic skid plate would. On the other hand, the elbow protections felt thin and flimsy compared to my (mid-range) skate elbow guards. I tried on almost every jacket in the shop (from leading brands), and the elbow padding was much thinner, in all cases, than the padding on my skate elbow guards. Even if it's G-Form, D30 or Knox-style self-hardening technology, call me old-fashioned but I don't trust <1cm impact protectors like I do thick foam, old-school ones (maybe it's just because I haven't tried them). A M/C crash is likely to be at a much higher speed than an EUC crash, so it makes sense that design is more focused on (high-speed) abrasion/friction resistance than on impact protection. But more troublesome (for EUC-riding) was the position and shape of the elbow-pads. They seemed much more focused on the centre and outside portion of the elbow, not on the inside. I understand that in a M/C crash, you're most likely to fall on your side (or at least that's been my experience), so either the centre or the outside of your elbow will be the first to hit the ground. But in an EUC crash the dynamics are very different. In every single fall I've had, upon hitting the ground and starting to slide, my arm has extended in a straight line (so inner part of the elbow was in contact with the ground) or my wrist guards have turned my arm inward; and when my elbow has hit the ground before my wrist, it's always been the inner side. I'm not taking sides here, but my personal experience confirms @Smoother's point of view (I'm developing a habit of disagreeing with you, aren't I, @Darrell Wesh? ). I just looked at the scratch marks on my elbow guards, and every single scratch is on the inner part of my elbow. I see the benefits of M/C jackets (chiefly convenience and abrasion protection), but have my doubts about how useful the elbow protections would be for EUC-riding. Even as I was trying on different jackets, something didn't feel right (for EUC use). Whether my arm was straight or flexed, the protections didn't seem to be in the right place. No matter what brand/model I tried, I got the same feeling. In the end, there are no EUC-specific products on the market, so we have to make do with whatever most closely resembles the kind of fall patterns we'll have. M/C equipment is sturdy and well-built, so I completely understand the appeal (I still haven't entirely discarded getting a M/C jacket), but it's specifically designed for motorcycles, with M/C-specific falls in mind. And as much as M/C equipment appeals to me, I don't think it offers the (specific) type of protection EUC-riders need, just like skateboard protections are perfect for skateboarders for pretty much useless for bikers...
  5. travsformation

    In the news...

    It's worth noting that (in my personal experience) I've NEVER seen an e-sccoter rider wearing protections. A helmet, at most, but even that's rare (at least around here). Which, TBH, explains a lot (in terms of injury statistics).... While EUC riders are much more aware of the risks involved, I don't get a sense e-scooter users are too aware of how easily a small pot hole can send them flying...
  6. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    I use a "Bigo" 900 lm bicycle headlight. It's very bright and strikes a nice balance between focused light and spread. On the V8 I mounted it on the handle (the velcro GoPro-style mount comes with the light): It worked well enough, but with two main problems: No matter how you adjust it (height-wise), the beam's height wil constantly vary. On steep up-hills (just like the EUC's factory light), it'll shine directly in front of the wheel, not giving you any long-distance visibility. On steep downhills, when braking hard, it'll provide great illumination of tree-tops, but not much of the road ahead of you And even on flat ground, the beam will end up too low when accelerating and too high when braking... I got a lot of complaints from pedestrians because it was too bright, even on "low light" mode (it has 3 modes: high, low and strobe/flashing). And although not being an a**hole to pedestrians was important to me, I was also concerned about blinding oncoming cars (not a good thing...) When I bought the 18XL, mounting it on the wheel was more complicated, so I mounted it on my helmet (which was difficult because of the curvature). But that didn't work out either, as I ended up blinding even more people by accident It was @Marty Backe who suggested using it like a flashlight. I initially didn't like it and found it to be a pain in the @$$, but once you get used to it, it works great: you have total control of where you focus the beam, so you can shine it a far distance ahead of you when riding fast on pavement (like an extension of the wheel's headlight), or right in front of you, if off-roading, for example. Of course, you can do the same thing with a helmet-mounted light, but in this case, you have the advantage that the light is always in your hand, so it's much easier to switch it on and off depending on whether you need it (which saves battery), and great to be able to put in flashing mode (without having to search the button on top of your helmet) when approaching an intersection or blind curve, to warn drivers that you're approaching. Which bike light you get depends on the use you intend on giving it (wheel-mounted, helmet-mounted, handheld, etc.). I'd say get something compact and lightweight with several different mounts is the best bet, so you can try different options and see what works best for you. As to power, I wouldn't get anything below 700 lumens; mine is 900 and works great, but there are similar ones with 1200 LM or more. Also, worth getting something with a rechargeable battery (USB). It's more more convenient than replacing batteries. Hope this helps, and congratulations on your first wheel!
  7. travsformation

    Good news from Germany

    THEORETICALLY, that's the manufacturers' responsibility. Just like when VW/Ford/Toyota introduce a new car into the market: buyers don't have to do anything, approval has been taken care of before they bought the vehicle. But if the certification laws come into play AFTER the vehicles have been sold...will the manufacturer be fair and spend the money on getting approval for EUCs that have already been sold, or will they ignore us (because they've already pocketed the cash) and focus on certification of new models only? It's anyone's guess...
  8. travsformation

    Good news from Germany

    Germany was 1/2 Western, 1/2 Eastern until not that long ago 😛 So where exactly do we draw the line between East and West? 😛 And what's the issue with East and West anyway? Isn't the USA a "beacon of democracy for the world"? That outcome was (supposing it were true), in the best case scenario, a funny twist of fate... (and I don't think history has portrayed a very accurate picture of what happened...) Personally, I don't feel any sense of belonging to any one nationality,so I?m not pro/anti American or any other nationality... I'm part American (Scots and Germans who emigrated to America) and part Alpine Gaul / Jewish Lebanese.. So... I don't expect anything and don't have any expectations on what the world will become (it's not like my opinion is going to affect anything anyway, so....). I don't have any judgement either about what will become... I'm not so arrogant as to think I can predict the outcome of history. Some things are just beyond our speculative capacity... All I meant by my comment was that confrontation and judgement don't tend to paint a pretty picture in the long-term canvas of history... Or in other words, empathy and compassion are a much better strategy than rejection and alienation (even if history can yield unpredictable and bizarrely positive or negative results, regardless of the situation...) My point being, how can we hold such inflexible (and ultimately, self-serving) views on EUC rights ("first world problems", as I call them) while so easily dismissing historical genocides or war refugees' basic human rights? Because if it's geopolitics we're concerned about....What about China? I have a feeling we're all too happy with our wheels to blacklist China for gradually overthrowing the US/West as the dominant global superpower... Self-serving? Yupp.. It's just human nature... Or are any of us refraining from buying wheels from "communist" China while we wait for the West to market an alternative? 😉 But back to my point... Let's just let people mingle, forget about politics and enjoy ourselves. It doesn't matter what nationality someone is, when you see them face-plant, your mirror neurons fire all the same, and the same thing when you see them pull off something amazing... I promise not to delve any more into politics, and make you all suffer my tedious rants, if others (I'm not referring to you) can refrain from making racially charged comments that are honestly quite worthy (IMHO) of being vetted based on racial/religious discrimination criteria... But... What were we talking about? German EUC regulations, right. Hmmm.... "If the police mess with you, run for it" is all I can say.
  9. travsformation

    Good news from Germany

    You said it! IMMIGRANTS! Don't you reckon the natives might have perceived European refugees as a threat? It's not like crime rates were going up, but more like widespread genocide was going through the roof. If Native Americans had applied the same criteria you expect Germany to apply, the U.S. as we know it, wouldn't exist....(just food for thought...) The U.S. is WAAAAAY ahead of Spain. Buses (school or not) are treated like any other vehicle. And city planning is atrocious: Take a look at this: bike lane (video footage from a ride yesterday) placed directly next to where people (disabled, in this case) get off the bus. Not even a "yield" sign. Nothing....(and no laws whatsoever about passing school buses) [Sigh...] But your video still comes to prove that legislation isn't enough. Public awareness and education (and respect towards others) is the key element at play. What's the point of legislation if no one respects it...? [Sigh....]
  10. travsformation

    Good news from Germany

  11. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    4m was just an (un)educated guess, I might be over-blowing the figure; memory is particularly unreliable in dramatic situations. But it was definitely my furthest flight to date... I'll admit it wasn't the scariest experience I've had on a wheel. I was much more shaken the last time I had to swerve to avoid a dog, got the wobbles of death (going 1/2 the speed) and had to bail (I stopped about 1m from a lamp post). Or even the first time I got speed wobbles on the 18XL: those few seconds of panic, scanning my surroundings and seeing trees, curbs, parked cars...realising how many ways bailing or crashing could go horribly wrong, all while trying to regain control of the wheel (which I somehow managed), seemed to last an ETERNITY. Getting hit by a car, even though I sustained no injuries, left me much more shaken too. And it definitely changed my approach towards intersections, stop signs and trusting drivers' judgement. This mishap, though, happened lightning-fast, out of the blue, and I rode away from it (mostly) unscathed. It wasn't until the next day, when the pain set in and I'd had time to process what had happened, that I realised how extremely lucky I'd been. My "crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency > crash > repeat" comment is only partly true, I've definitely learned a few valuable lessons: ALWAYS gear up Even if pushing beyond your comfort zone is a good way of improving your riding skills, take into account that you're intentionally accepting a series of risks, so plan for them so you can minimise the damage as much as possible in case you screw up (large, open spaces with no trees, lamp posts, curbs, parked cars, PEOPLE, etc.). When "beta testing" your skills, put more thought into the safety of others: In this particular case, I got lucky, but a much more deserted area (industrial area in the outskirts) would have been more appropriate for speed testing. Even if it was late at night and the streets were deserted, that doesn't outrule the possibility of some random drunk stepping onto the road from behind a parked van, for instance. More speed = less reaction time = PAY EXTRA ATTENTION Always take your riding skills into account. As in "Cool, now I can ride at 40 km/h without getting speed wobbles. But can I react adequately/control the wheel if something unexpected happens at this speed?" In Spain several companies offer EUC liability insurances. Get one. NOW. @Smoother's 2-second rule Adrenaline rushes are fun...but don't let go of the metaphorical steering wheel and let adrenaline do the driving Any other suggestions? I guess I'd already (subconsciously) made the decisions above when I started this thread, but they felt like logical adjustments that went without saying, and the "crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency" pattern rang so true that I didn't see much point in denying it. But I'm glad you insisted on my lack of a plan. Actually listing the measures I plan on adopting has made me much more aware of them, and in turn, will hopefully make my experience & the lessons learned much more beneficial for the community/anyone reading these lines. Even if complacency is going to inevitably settle in again, sooner or later... (and even if accidents are bound to happen sooner or later, no matter how many precautions you take, which is also an important concept to bear in mind, even if it wasn't the case for me in this particular experience)
  12. travsformation

    Good news from Germany

    I agree with you there, and yes, the headphones and ear buds law does apply to drivers too. Having the radio on full blast, as in loud enough for it to isolate you from your surroundings, is also illegal. One would think so, but then again, a truck driver is already much more isolated from his environment (engine noise, windows rolled up, etc), and car radios are such an ingrained tradition there's not much that can be done about it. Or are they illegal in the US? 😉 No one said laws necessarily make sense, or cup holders and ash trays in cars would possibly be illegal too... In any case, people don't tend to respect the law all that much here anyway so... Listening to the radio at reasonable volume levels is perfectly legal (but discouraged in driving classes, as it's a distraction. Then again, so is talking to the copilot or scratching your balls...). If it weren't legal, you'd have to outlaw car radios entirely, and I don't even think that would work. People would probably switch to portable Bluetooth speakers and hide them under the seat when they got pulled over 😂 Spaniards are world-famous for getting drunk and running in front of angry bulls... What does that tell you about our risk assessment? 😂
  13. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    Cheers! Will check that out tomorrow, as it's my turn to make dinner today Should I be reading into that? Hard to say, that was the last thing I was thinking about at the time I'd say...about....4 metres? (although memory can be deceiving in these situations). I don't have a clue what the wheel did, but based on the damage to the side side pad, I'm guessing it went flying, landed on its side and the side pad stopped it in its tracks pretty quickly. I couldn't say how far the wheel was from the speed bump, but definitely a hell of a lot closer than I was (which is a good thing, in this case) It could go in the "99% of my ride was fantastic" thread though! Or with @meepmeepmayer's blessing, in a dedicated Glück im Unglück thread
  14. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    I'm guessing that would be Guanyin, Goddess of compassion and mercy Thanks! Pain has mostly subsided, and the tingling was gone by the next morning. It was on my left hand; the shoulder that took the hit was my right, so I'm guessing it was just from the friction. I imagine that when the elbow guard finished doing its job and my arm was fully extended, the backpack's friction started to overpower the sliding momentum and turned by body sideways, which is why I ended up with my left palm on the ground. As you said, good thing I was geared up! (And glad I was wearing a backpack, I'd never considered it as a "safety element" until now) You said it!
  15. travsformation

    First 40+ km/h wipe-out

    Good question. 30-35 km/h is an OK riding speed for me. I like having having the extra power for on-demand acceleration (overtaking, keeping up with cars in certain situations), and bought the 18XL more for the range and safety margin (preventing cut-outs) than to ride at speed. But all the same, speed wasn't the decisive factor in this case, and usually isn't (in my particular case). As to my plan...I imagine I'll follow the loop you mentioned: crash > hyper-vigilance > complacency > crash > repeat (and maybe upgrade my protection gear)
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