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  1. 29 points
    As the guy who placed the first order for an 84V Nikola from @Jason McNeil and was riding one from the first batch, I was concerned when @Marty Backe reported the burnout of his control board. After seeing the pictures I parked the wheel until I could find the time to tear it down and inspect the control board (good to have other wheels to ride ). A long career in electronics design and manufacturing made me suspect that this was an assembly "innovation" not a one-off quality slip. Before disassembly my Nikola was riding flawlessly showing no signs of a problem. (By the way this wheel is WONDERFUL!) I had only put about 90 miles on the wheel before parking it. My rides were local rides on paved roads with rolling hills and max speeds of about 26 mph (42 kph). So... not much stress on this wheel. I have attached a picture of my control board that shows glue residue on the MOSFETs but no apparent thermal damage to the board or MOSFETs. As previously commented in this thread the presence of a substance that is a very efficient thermal INSULATOR on the MOSFET heat transfer surface is a big problem. I will be rebuilding the wheel on Monday after correcting the defect and bringing the thermal management up to what I consider an acceptable level. I will post a video of the rebuild for anyone interested in a DIY solution. So far when anyone has looked they found glue. Just another data point...
  2. 28 points
    News Directly From Gotway Gotway has reached out to me, acknowledging that they have seen my video and that they want to replace my control board. But here's the real kicker, and should be of interest to many. After telling me that a new board will be sent to me, on a separate line is this, "With big MOSFETs" So it appears that Gotway does have a new 84-volt control board design with what I assume is the TO-247 MOSFETs. Very exciting. They've heard us
  3. 24 points
    I have been busy over the last few days exploring the MOSFET thermal coupling issue on the Nikola. I put together a two part video that describes the current situation with the Nikolas and what I saw when inspecting my control board. It also documents a number of informal experiments that I did to test various thermal solutions using the Nikola heat sink, thermal pads and other thermal coupling solutions. The first video is available now and I should have the other done tomorrow that describes what seems to be a significant improvement over Gotway's standard assembly technique. Of course there may not actually be a need for better thermal performance and the bad units so far may have just been overzealous application of glue. I hope that these videos are useful to those of you that are considering your options on this issue.
  4. 23 points
    Here is the second part of my video discussing the Gotway Nikola control board inspection and rebuild. This includes one more lab test and a detailed reassembly using thermal paste coupled with electrical insulation techniques. @Nils nailed it; I ended up publishing the director's cut. Most importantly, now that I have finished documenting this thermal issue and its solutions... I HAVE MY NIKOLA BACK.
  5. 21 points
    Ok, some words to the rumours of "massive Motor" Problems. There are None! Because of a partly different Motor of the 16X the 5 Pre-Production to the 2 prototypes the wheels had that "oscillation" when going over 40kmh. This is allready fixed by a Firmware update last Weekend! The production of the 16X will, nonetheless, be a Little bit delayed ….and unfortunatly be produced only in Mid July. The reason for this delay is in the massive Feedback, received from the test of the pre-production models and asking for some changes! That are small parts done better for better waterproofing, another pedal angle and other small and very minor details, but also a Hardware-Change on the Motherboard. KingSong wants to deliver a flawless 16X to it's customers, so the extra time added might be annoying...but in the end this is all for our own best!
  6. 19 points
  7. 19 points
    So, I had planned to open my wheel some time later, but went shopping today for some materials to prepare for later. Having some prerequisites at home it turned out that I couldn't live with the suspense any longer though, so I rolled up my sleeves and opened the wheel up. After a rough fight with silicon I freed up the board enough so that I could somewhat inspect the MOSFETs without taking apart the board. Everything looked clean, and I couldn't see any traces of glue anywhere. My wheel has performed well even when I've purposefully loaded it, so I already knew it wasn't a lemon, and the first inspection seemed to reflect this. However, you can't really see that much from the outside though, and there could still be glue hiding under the thermal pads which would be impossible to determine from the outside. Hence I proceeded with disconnecting the board and after besting the silicon foe again I disassembled it (a pox on anyone putting silicon in screw heads!) . I suck at documenting stuff well apparently but here's a picture of my MOSFETs with the inner row thermal pad removed: It was completely clean for all practical purposes. Only the MOSFET to the left had some glue/stuff on it's sides, but nothing covering the pad. The two MOSFETs to the right might look a bit weird in the photo, but those are discolorations and not anything do to with any adhesive. While not shown in the photo, the outer row of MOSFETs was completely clean as well. I fitted new thermal pads and reassembled the board, which was finicky but not super hard (heat sink at the bottom, place thermal pads with ready made holes in their correct positions, fit the board looking through the MOSFET screw holes, keep pressure on the board and insert screws for the middle row. The outer thermal pad can be adjusted if needed easily enough). In conclusion, not all Nikola boards are glued it would seem. I have a very early version for what it's worth, product code indicates it was assembled on April the 2nd. This would seem to lend some credibility to the theory that only certain wheels have been assembled badly. I believe that my wheel is a very early one, and that for instance @Marty Backe's is a later one. If so, that would suggest that it's not a case of any early process being improved on shortly after but crappy assembly for certain wheels. Anyway, after reassembling the wheel I went for a ride, and a great one it was! My Nikola is now open for business again!
  8. 19 points
    Apologies for the late attendance to the party. Since receiving a 2nd board failure (this case was different, it was powered on from a stand still & didn't respond), including Marty's, within two weeks of shipping out the first batch of Nikolas, I've reached out to Linnea on Thursday to try to come up with an action plan to see what options are available to greatly reduce/eliminate the risk of these MOSFET thermal overload events. The evidence from both of these failures has marked similarity in outcome (see below), where this glue may be acting as a thermal barrier, not helped by the absence of thermal paste on the underside of the metal heat transfer surface. One option being explored, is to recall the boards. remove this glue, & apply the thermal paste. To date Gotway have shipped 600 units; they say they have not received reports from other regions of this failure—it's likely more will trickle in in time. Putting out an official recall is not something to be taken lightly; in their defense, they're probably looking for a few other reports, before taking this step. Gotway have a lot of experience with building high power motor vehicles; they had gone through several rough patches, particularly with reliability of earlier generation boards, with the weaker MOSFETS, but at least then they were pretty consistent with applying liberal quantities of thermal paste to this underside. It was baffling to me why they would go back to an inferior TO22x FET package AND now we learn about the lack of thermal paste. From my experience, such oversights are usually not the result of penny-pinching, but execution on the production line, where the factory needs a ruthless eagle-eyed floor manager, to see that every step of assembly is done by the book. The silver-lining to all this, is that an early finding in the production cycle is a necessary facet to a small-scale non-ISO production facility, where the manufacturer's financial pain of having to deal with a crisis, means that they will be imbued with a sense that this situation must never occur again. For all current Nikola owners, please hang in there, we should have an action plan in the next few days. EDIT: To anticipate questions on the 100V Nikolas, they are using the TO247 MOSFET package, the first production of these special edition 1845Wh variants is still underway, there is assurance that in light of this episode, they will getting the thermal paste treatment! 
  9. 19 points
    Apologies for the late attendance to the party. Since receiving a 2nd board failure (this case was different, it was powered on from a stand still & didn't respond), including Marty's, within two weeks of shipping out the first batch of Nikolas, I've reached out to Linnea on Thursday to try to come up with an action plan to see what options are available to greatly reduce/eliminate the risk of these MOSFET thermal overload events. The evidence from both of these failures has marked similarity in outcome (see below), where this glue may be acting as a thermal barrier, not helped by the absence of thermal paste on the underside of the metal heat transfer surface. One option being explored, is to recall the boards. remove this glue, & apply the thermal paste. To date Gotway have shipped 600 units; they say they have not received reports from other regions of this failure—it's likely more will trickle in in time. Putting out an official recall is not something to be taken lightly; in their defense, they're probably looking for a few other reports, before taking this step. Gotway have a lot of experience with building high power motor vehicles; they had gone through several rough patches, particularly with reliability of earlier generation boards, with the weaker MOSFETS, but at least then they were pretty consistent with applying liberal quantities of thermal paste to this underside. It was baffling to me why they would go back to an inferior TO22x FET package AND now we learn about the lack of thermal paste. From my experience, such oversights are usually not the result of penny-pinching, but execution on the production line, where the factory needs a ruthless eagle-eyed floor manager, to see that every step of assembly is done by the book. The silver-lining to all this, is that an early finding in the production cycle is a necessary facet to a small-scale non-ISO production facility, where the manufacturer's financial pain of having to deal with a crisis, means that they will be imbued with a sense that this situation must never occur again. For all current Nikola owners, please hang in there, we should have an action plan in the next few days. EDIT: To anticipate questions on the 100V Nikolas, they are using the TO247 MOSFET package. The first production of these special edition 1845Wh variants is still underway, so there is assurance that in light of this episode, they will getting the thermal paste treatment!
  10. 18 points
    Another epic ride. Almost 11-hours and 50-miles before we got back to the cars. We were borderline lost in the mountains, descending 3000 feet into a canyon where the only way out was to ride & walk 6+ miles on a rough trail that required traversing a river more then 30 times, sometimes over our knees. Towards the end, when this picture was taken, we were starting to go crazy with the water crossings, so why not get our group picture standing in the river From the left: @Dzlchef, me, @Rama Douglas, and @Jrkline "Wheel Whisperer"
  11. 17 points
    The Great Hot-Glue Fiasco OK folks, here's the new theory. The "stuff" that was stuck to my burned MOSFETs was thought to be a thin plastic backing from the thermal transfer material. But it never quite seemed like plastic film to me, or melted plastic film. A bit rubbery actually as I tried to peel it off. I believe it's hot glue. It melts easily when I touch it with my hot-glue gun. So I did a little experiment. I put a dollop of hot glue on one of the MOSFETs and pressed the thermal transfer sheet onto. A little bit later I pulled it off and it peeled off just like the other one. Here are some pictures that show the sequence of my experiment Not a perfect match, but who knows what type of hot-glue or applicator is being used. After poking and melting the original substance, I can say it's some type of hot-glue. Why? To assemble the circuit board to the heat-sink plate, the board has to be flipped over and the thermal transfer sheet must be between the MOSFETs and the heat-sink. After flipping the board, it's easy for the assembler to lift up the board a little and slide the sheet under the MOSFETs. But the inner row of MOSFETs (the one with the blown MOSFETs shown above) can't be easily accessed to slide the thermal sheet under the MOSFETs. Imagine yourself trying to do this. So instead of developing a fixture to align everything properly, I'm theorizing that the assembly line folks pulled out the glue-gun (the same one that they use to stick the pedal magnets on the shell and a bunch of other components - us Gotway owners know that Gotway loves hot-glue) and glued the thermal sheet to the MOSFETs so the sheet would stay in place when they flipped the board. Seems to make sense to me, knowing Gotway and their tight oversight of QC . Still waiting for feedback from EWheels. I'm pretty sure Jason is in communication with Gotway so hopefully we'll learn the real scoop eventually. But if my theory holds, seems to me that every Gotway wheel that has an inner row of MOSFETs (not just the Nikola) is a time-bomb waiting to blow. Now I think the other wheels (MSX, Monster, etc) are using the bigger MOSFETs and the hot-glue thermal barrier might not be an issue for those. But when they switched to the smaller MOSFETs, the assembly process became the weak link. BTW, hot-glue melts at ~120-degrees Celsius. That's probably hotter than these MOSFETs are supposed to get, so the hot-glue likely stays a solid and acts as a nice thermal break. This is my theory, and I'm sticking to it I miss my Nikola
  12. 16 points
    New Board Is A Fail - Fixed This is extremely frustrating and makes me pissed at Gotway all over again As I intimated in my previous post, the board configuration is different. Well, the wiring harness is so different that it's incompatible with this board!!! You can imagine my frustration as I excitedly put the wheel back together and have this result. Sure the wheel balances and almost everything appears to work. But the headlamp is always on. On the old board, one wire attached to a connector that went into the speaker module (what's up with that?). And the other went directly to the control board. Now, both wires to the fan are pre-installed on the control board. The connector from the speaker module? Just handing there because there's nothing to connect to. On the circuit diagram above, there's a connector for the light. I don't have any unused wires to plug into that. I'll continue poking around, but wouldn't you think that Gotway would know they made incompatible changes and offer advice??? I'll update this post if I can figure something out, otherwise it's a plea for help to @Jason McNeil Fix After tugging and probing I took my best guess at the light connector and moved it to the Light Connector shown in the picture. Now everything is working. Still leaves one of the identified connectors (USB/Tail light/etc) un-populated, and that wire from the speaker module that used to go to the fan is still dangling. But it works. Jason is going to have a fun time documenting this for the people that get to do this. Oh, and all of those gray plastic covers that hide the shell screws - they aren't all the same size. So keep track of those as you remove them to prevent you having to spend 10-minutes finding the right cover for each screw So I'm calm again Overheat hill test tomorrow morning.
  13. 15 points
    Tired of picking up your wheel every time you encounter a curb? Here's the trick to jumping with ANY electric unicycle and how to make your own Kuji Pads.
  14. 15 points
    In my Nikola down time, I painted it (no more white and black pedals). And I removed the crappy plastic imitation grip tape and replaced it with proper 3M Safety-Walk ($7) grip tape.
  15. 15 points
    So it appears that there's movement on the Gotway front. There's a direct post from Gotway on Facebook that indicates new control boards will be provided to all 1st generation Nikola owners. The only proviso seems to be if you bought direct from China (Aliexpress, etc.) you're on your own for getting direct support. There's the usual language barrier, but I think they're just saying you'll get warranty service (potential to have your dealer do the fix) but the other purchasers will have to do the work themselves. The boards will still be free. Looks like we've come full circle in only a bit more than 2-weeks. Not bad EDIT: I should have originally said that everyone will get a new board except for @Phil McLaughlin since his has superior heat shedding than any of us will ever have
  16. 15 points
    It's amazing how fast kids learn. J (11yo) tried out the MTen3 last year for a total of about an hour. At the end of this weekend camping, she was jumping over speed bumps. Brandon (6yo) has been riding the MTen3 for about 6 months. This weekend he learned how to sit/ride/jump the MCM5. He rides it like mini-motorcycle.
  17. 15 points
    New Board On The Way Jason (EWheels) has just received the new control board(s). It's heading my way today and I'll be installing it on Tuesday. Really looking forward to it. Look at those beautiful new MOSFETs
  18. 15 points
    Congratulations Coincidentally, today is our 30th wedding anniversary About to go out for a nice dinner.
  19. 14 points
    Production has started...first wheels should go out in 2-3 days!
  20. 14 points
    Yes I received Jason’s email and agreed to pay the extra shipping cost. Favorable weather is so limited in the Northeast. $250 is a bit steep but I’ll just cut back on taking my wife out to dinner.
  21. 14 points
    I've bashed Gotway (without ever owning one ) in the past, but this debacle isn't exactly anything we haven't seen before. Granted, GW is probably the only manufacturer that more seriously pushes the envelope (KS and Ninebot have been catching up though), but at what cost? Failure rates of EUCs are higher than most types of vehicles, but subjectively it seems GW's still leading the pack there (too)... KS has been more conservative with their designs, but they've also had issues with newer wheels (at least the lock-up and shaking issues with the newer KS18's), after a good run with the KS16-line, which had the lowest number of warranty issues a year or two back on the reseller statistics published somewhere in the forums, but those are probably outdated. And even then, the warranty-repair rate of over 1% of KS16S wasn't exactly stellar (that's still more than 1 in 100). CGI lately got a KS14 replacement board from them that had the battery connector installed in reverse (wtf?) and fried the charger and the new board. Ninebot seems to concentrate more on the (likely far more lucrative) e-scooter -business, after Z-series hasn't exactly been shining in reliability, although it seems to be mostly issues with the battery drain, and there have been rumors here that they might be leaving the EUC-business all together. InMotion had really serious battery issues with the V10-line (don't recall the model, V10F or something?), that could catch fire by itself if moisture creeped into the battery packs. GW, Ninebot, KS and InMotion seem to be pretty much the big 4 nowadays. On the smaller brands, after a couple of years of hiatus, Rockwheel released GT16, but the V1 had lots of problems, don't know how the newer V2 has fared, better I assume, after GR16 I haven't really followed up on them (and that was already released before I got here... 2014?). Supposedly they do have a new model (GT16S / Iron) coming out, but it hasn't been released yet to my knowledge. I haven't followed up on IPS, but looks like they're more or less dead in the water, I5/S5 were the latest models? IPS has had a relatively good track record on reliability, as far as I remember, but they've never made a real high-performance wheel. Maybe they're just cooking up a new model, and taking their time, which probably is not a bad idea. That's pretty much all the "bigger" manufacturers that come to mind, even though EUCs are relatively new (Solowheel early this decade, 2012 or something, the Chinese manufactures emerging somewhere around 2014-2015?) a lot of manufacturers have already disappeared entirely from the scene. We may be in something like the "Model-T -era", but I'd expect better reliability from these things, especially at the current speeds, considering how much more worse a failure can be if you're travelling at something like 30mph or such. Some people have suggested that the manufacturers should follow something more like the automotive / aerospace industry standards, but likely fail to understand the costs of such (a friend of mine, who's a helicopter mechanic, once told me that a single specially built bolt to a chopper can cost >60€ per piece, more complex parts can easily be thousands) and especially on cars, the economies of scale. Some car models are built and sold in the amounts of hundreds of thousands yearly, and in total there are millions of cars built and sold yearly, the entire EUC business is a small fraction compared to that. The requirements are much stricter, and still there are issues with them at times (albeit usually much "milder"). The cycles are longer, and more time is taken to test things thoroughly. While the software is complex, I know that the piece of software I wrote a couple of months ago won't be in real vehicles (not cars, btw) until about two years from now. Before that, it has gone through a lot of testing, and possible bugs should have been found and ironed out (hopefully... ) But maybe a lot of it comes down to us "consumers". We want (demand) more speed, more features and more power on the wheels, and we want it now, not year or two down the road. This puts pressure on the manufacturers to come up with new, faster, bigger and more powerful models, while making it look "sexy" on the outside or something and hasten the development cycle, maybe even skip proper testing, before putting the new model on the market. Unfortunately, this seems to be a somewhat general trend with many products worldwide. I started working professionally in the software-business in the latter half of last decade, when the "agile development" was picking up pace, and while it can produce good software when done "right", it feels like a lot of companies just use it as an excuse to push out their product earlier, develop things in shorter cycles and do the beta-testing on the users. I've heard the term "time to market" a bit too often. And "software can always be updated afterwards and bugs fixed, since nowadays everyone has Internet and everything's online" At times, it seems this is what's happening with the wheels also. Unfortunately, a hardware or software bug there can have much more dire consequences than with (non-critical) products. Slowing down the pace might not be a bad idea. More careful design and planning of the entire assembly procedure, proper testing cycles etc. would likely probably bring down the failure rate a lot. But that means that the buyers will need to wait longer, and many people seem to be "conditioned" to always get the newest and latest on everything. Why buy the model that has been proven over a year or two, when the new, shinier and "better" model is available very soon? The marketing on most things seems to be feeding this, you just have to get that new phone model, the 1 or 2 year old one you have isn't that good anymore I was reading the hardware product design article-series someone linked to a while ago, and while it had good points, it ended with the "planning the product lifetime" or something along those lines, which basically stated that when you're finishing up your current model, most products have a lifecycle of 18 months(!) and you should start planning how to fade away the old model and how to get people to buy your next, better, shinier product... Don't know how much of any real use my drunken ramblings are, likely none, but that's my 2 cents anyway...
  22. 14 points
    So we had strike action at our work place ,my z10 was remarkable for striking, riding up and down with flags i made it to the local news😁
  23. 14 points
    New Control Board Is In The House Just received the new board. I can tell you that this is a completely new board. They didn't just put new MOSFETs in (not that they could have fit on the old board), but in the details, everything is different. The thermal transfer sheet does not have self-adhesive, but it's one large sheet that means there's no need for glue when assembling the unit. On a more frustrating level (which we've seen in the past - nothing new here), the connectors are different. Actually, not different connectors (that would be really bad) but different locations. Of course I documented my existing board, but it's quite a bit different. Fortunately I happened to come across this picture that Gotway posted to Facebook. With this information and tracing the wires in the wheel, I should be able to figure out what connector goes where. Let's hope maybe in 10-years we'll have proper documentation. It's like you go to your car dealer to get a replacement door switch and all they can sell you is one that looks similar but has different pin-outs, etc.
  24. 14 points
    Just finished editing Day 2 of the Electric Games! This time its all about the competition, lithium battery explosions and the newly invented game: Basketwheel.
  25. 13 points
    Replaced my board yesterday, and shot some video during the process. My board came with the fan, so if you get a board without a fan (e.g. eWheel customers) the process will be slightly different as you'll have to move the old fan over as well. Didn't open up the new board since I'm away from home and didn't have any thermal pads available, but I'd be very surprised to see a repeat of the earlier mistake. Might still open it up later though Went for a nice ride earlier today, the first real ride with the new board - such a great wheel
  26. 13 points
    About a month ago I was getting ready to take a ride and into my head pops the phrase "Jesus, take the wheel" and I broke down laughing. (My name is not Jesus BTW.) It was pretty clear that this phrase belonged on a T-shirt, along with an appropriate design, and so for your potential amusement I present the attached image.
  27. 13 points
    I got challenged by Meline Moultipass (French youtuber) who started the #PENDWHEEL challenge. Ive challenged Kevin of @Alien Rides, Manman of Beijing, and @Jason McNeil (eWheels). Lets bring all our communities together with this challenge.
  28. 13 points
    The "flat" version of my mini-adventure ride in the mountains, including the forced exit via the state prison facility
  29. 13 points
  30. 13 points
    I'm not too worried about a delay. Rather they take their time to get it right. I'd take quality control over production speed anytime.
  31. 13 points
    Gotway: "LOL we put glue on our mosfets!" Kingsong: "LOL see you in 2020!"
  32. 12 points
    Introducing one of the new generation to the world of EUCs - my eldest son
  33. 12 points
  34. 12 points
    You're right. This app is a piece of s*it and even if some permission are really needed for social features, as for Android standards it should work as a mere control app when these privileges are not granted. But... this is theory. In practice, you should do what others wrote - install this app, make what is needed to configure your wheel and uninstall app. Personally, I use old phone that doesn't contains any data. Otherwise I use WheelLog. Anyway you don't have to worry to much. It won't have access to all the content of your device. Each Android application is sandboxed, so KS app won't have access to others app data. And don't forget that the real spy is Google. And if you really value your privacy, you should first stop using Android devices. Period.
  35. 12 points
    I just want to ride, I don't care about these bells and whistles. The app should allow me to chose what I want to do. If I don't allow certain permissions, then I don't get the luxuries, period. Which should my choice; not theirs. f you do not see the privacy invasion here, then you do not see the behind the scenes here. The app should allow your phone, via bluetooth to perform all the tasks necessary to operate the wheel. You already have gps on your phone. Kingsong does not need to make and manage the phone calls on your device, or access photos, media, and files as they please, take photos and record whenever, and whatever else they require permission for, otherwise not allow the wheel to be used. This is outrageous, no matter how you dress it up.
  36. 12 points
    Hi all, I'm not really sure why I'm making this posting - it's not a wheel review and not a riding lesson either but nevertheless I thought I'd type a few lines of what I think of EUC riding from a beginners perspective. I wasn't really sure why I wanted my first EUC, but somehow after seeing videos on youtube I thought I want one and will attempt to justify the expense later. It just seemed to me they offered a bit of fun, a practical means of getting around, a bit of a challenge learning a new skill, a little bit of risk that's adds to the fun and the challenge without risking my life and a bit of an excuse to socialise with other local riders. At nearly 60yrs old I'm not a youngster and did wonder if I'd be too old to learn to ride, I'm not yet ready for the knackers yard yet but I'm also not going to win a 100m sprint. I'd already by now talked myself into buying one but wasn't sure what I needed so registering with this forum and asking a few questions seemed to be the way forward, thankfully I got plenty of useful advice so it was time to get the wallet out and treat myself. As an old git a rider of maturing years I couldn't really justify spending £1500 on a hobby I might not even enjoy so I settled on the Inmotion V5F. So, 2 months later and nearly 250 miles what do I think? It's turned out to be a fantastic purchase As I said this isn't a wheel review and people can decide for themselves what they think of the V5F but from personal experience I can say it's been great fun. Neighbours looked at first..... 'look at that 60yr old idiot trying to ride that kids toy' was what I thought they were saying internally. Sure the first few days involved an awful lot of falls (60 yr olds don't learn as easily as 20yr olds) but nothing to get to concerned about. Perseverance says you can do pretty much anything with enough time and enough determination and riding an EUC is no different. What started as a 5ft long ride holding on to a railing soon became a 5yd one without support, that became a 50yd ride in a day or two. After a few days I could reasonably confidently stay on but the wheel decided the destination and steering was something yet to be learned. I opted for a day of hard core training doing nothing but figure 8 turns in a carpark - it was boring but well worth the effort. Suddenly I could control this damn thing - I decided where we are going, not the wheel. I'd say I'd ridden about 100 miles before I could really start to turn tight curves and feel confident that I had control. It's only now in the last few days at 200+ miles that I can reliably get on and off without support but the freedom it gives is incredible If you are new to this game and contemplating buying your first wheel - just do it. I honestly think any able bodied person can learn to ride with a bit of practice. Just like having a magic carpet once you get used to it
  37. 11 points
    Edit:  there are now "official" statements from Gotway (on Facebook) that acknowledge the problem and that new control boards will be available for all owners of the original Nikola. Owners are supposed to contact the dealer where they bought the wheel. Link to video of board replacement: ______________________ Unfortionately GW used something like hot glue inbetween the mosfet and the thermal pad as ?assembly help? for the nikola. Until now two cases are known: If one is interested in the "whole story", it starts here with @Marty Backe's report after disassembly of his nikola after the mosfets burned at the beginning ("baby hill") of overheat hill So if you are one of the happy owners of this, otherwise great wheel - PLEASE DRIVE CAREFUL AND DON'T TAKE IT TO THE MAX, DO NOT OVERLY BURDEN THE NIKOLA (for now). Hopefully there will be soon some official statements from GW with a solution to this problem offered! A "small" point, which also came out in this discussion after the fryed mosfets happened on overheat hill is that the reported current is very often very high (much more 90A current warnings than @Marty Backe normaly gets with his GWs) and a very low reported temperature! So it seems one should not wait for a overtemp alarm to be raised - watch the current (spikes?). Or even better - TAKE TIME TO RELAX AND DRIVE COMFORTABLY UNTIL THIS IS SOLVED! Edit: A great teardown and some thermal distribution test Second Part
  38. 11 points
    With @Rama Douglas
  39. 11 points
    Another video from my recent ride with @who_the
  40. 11 points
  41. 11 points
    I don't really know WTF to trust anymore with this damn NIKOLA. So got the new board installed, powered it up, running great, fan kicks in and I'm thinking awesome wheel is working great and my fan works. I'm rolling it back and forth and SNAP, CRACKLE, POP! Wheel shuts down and what is that SMELL! Did this new board just blow some MOSFETS? Surely not! I took the board out and opened it up. Damn, something really bad happened!
  42. 11 points
    Well he unfortunately abysmally failed to respond to the needs of the community, when he was needed the most. You OK there @Rehab1? Getting old? Well don't worry, your Swedish friend got your back and after a painstaking search of the Internet I finally found it! Also Marty, how about got actually getting some sun on those legs? I'm not one to comment on others' appearances, but that's just awkward.
  43. 11 points
    Another picture from the group ride. Here we are posing in front for the original Batcave entrance from the 1960's Batman TV show. It was nice and cool inside
  44. 11 points
  45. 11 points
    I had the wheel longer than Chris and was able to get some solid riding time in; may be 50 miles? so I'll try to do a quick summary: Problems- the high speed lumps, at top speed, around 28mph or above, the wheel has a slight shake, it feels like you are running across a series of painted lines on the road. This was an improvement from before bust still noticeable. The firmware still feels beta, the battery level stick at 100% so I have no idea how much power I have left. haven't dug in to see if there are any other weirdness. The wheel- This is the most fun wheel I have ridden so far. There I said it, I love the Z10 more, however it is a wild ride and you need to constantly be on top of it. The 16x have the same sense of weight and stability in turns but is completely predictable. Acceleration and braking both feels smoother than the Z10, more subdue which is both a good and bad thing. The wheel is dead quiet, in a quiet room I can actually hear the hum when I turn on its head light. no one will know when you come up behind them. You can ride at the top end (31mph), but I feel slightly iffy doing it. However I feel more confident doing so than when I am riding the Z10. It is very very maneuverable, carving feels great on this wheel. the body feels very comfortable between your legs, I like to keep my right leg bend with my right knee right up against the body, works very well with this wheel. They weren't kidding about the trolley handle, compare to the handle on this, the one on a z10 is like a random tree branch you picked up on the road and duct taped to the wheel. Head lights works very well, I don't like lights in general but the angle and spread works fine. The placement of the LED strip is not ideal; its right on the corner and unprotected, if the wheel takes a tumble there's a good chance the lens will get scratched, cracked or what have you. Not sure about real range, since I can't see the battery level, but I rode the wheel hard today 30 miles including up and down the tall Queens borough bridge twice and no throttling at all. Have to say this again, this is a fun FUN wheel to ride. Will try to answer any question anyone have; wheel is going to Tishawn next.
  46. 11 points
    Hsiang now has his review up.
  47. 11 points
    As of today (Saturday), Gotway has not responded to Jason's queries, to the best of my knowledge. They appear to be playing Deaf, Dumb, and Blind. Jason can elaborate further if he wants, but there has been at least one additional catastrophic board failure that looks like my board (same exploded MOSFETs and glue). Presumably this user was not riding up Overheat-Hill. So this is a real concern folks. Somehow Gotway needs to feel the pressure. I think it's probably safe to ride mellow-like, but if you have one I wouldn't push it. But that's me.
  48. 11 points
    The thanks goes to you for potentially sparing me and others a trip down the road on our faces! Yes I have been keeping Jason in the loop on my rebuild. In truth it is sooo hard to get a product right until a few thousand units get out the door. I am more disappointed then angry. I guess I am a fellow Stoic.
  49. 10 points
    During a night ride with @Rama Douglas, I was enjoying the San Diego Scenery when all of a sudden I couldn't feel the wheel under my feet. Then the wheel came back shooting my feet upwards. Most of the time I just let my knees absorb the bounce but not this time for some reason. I felt my body lowering to the ground and next thing I know I was lying on my back sliding across the pavement with a smile on my face (and possibly laughing?). I had just experienced my first fall on pavement. It all happened so fast and I probably was not going more then 15 MPH but I ended up riding over a small recessed manhole cover. My left arm was the first to hit followed by my shoulder and left hip. I rolled onto my back immediately and started to slide on my back with feet in the air (for what seemed like a foot or two but probably only a couple inches). Helmet shows no sign of contact with the ground. Luckily I ride with a cheap armored jacket that saved me from any road rash and bruises. So I just wanted to put it out there that forearm, elbow, shoulder, and back protection is nice to have. I would have had road rash all over my back and arm had I not been wearing it. Here is a link to a jacket similar to what I have. I also was wearing a LED blinker on my back that I landed on. Still works great but now has some character. I use it to be seen and let cars know which way I'm turning. Was also wearing just a regular jacket over everything and that got pretty torn up. Though this was not a "high" speed crash, I was disconnected from my wheel and hit the ground. I just want this to be a testimony that cheap hard plastic protection is better than soft fleshy skin. In any fall on pavement, I agree with others that sliding is the best option. Other than a sore left hip (no abrasion), I am completely unharmed. Happy to also report that my KS 18XL is unscathed thanks to the hard work of @The Fat Unicyclist. Still looks good as new (after many many falls) See photos of my gear damage here. Again, had I not spent $45 bucks I would not have had a smile on my face when I hit the ground.
  50. 10 points
    It finally stopped raining and I was able to go on a longer ride today; I got it up to max speed and confirm the issue Chris and Eddie had mentioned. It felt like you are running over a rapid series of tiny wavy bumps, the movement is slight and likely why it wasn't noticeable in video. However at that kind of speed any irregularity is unnerving. I am trying to updating the firmware now (to 1.02) and will have one more chance to ride the wheel tomorrow before handing it over to Tishawn and will report if the issue persist after the update. btw for anyone considering or have already committed to the purchase; this issue only came up when I really try to push the wheel to its limit. I personally rarely ride at that kind of speed, and the 16x is otherwise a super stable, smooth and very maneuverable wheel.
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