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How To Learn The Electric Unicycle


Milli Zhao
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1 hour ago, Marty Backe said:

This is so funny, how they market the wheels based on the size. The more advanced that you are, the bigger the wheel that you are supposed to ride. There seems to be such a big disconnect between the manufacturers of the wheels and the people who actually use them.

Hi, dear @Marty Backe, thanks for your attention. Don't you think 14' is easier for learn than 16', 16' is easier to control  than 18'?:) Normally only when we are very experienced on unicycles, can we master the 18'. That's why we say 14' most suit for entry level, 18' for experienced riders. On the other hand, it's true that many clients first buy 14', then upgrade to 16', then 18'. What do you say? May I know what you've observed?

 

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3 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

In my opinion a bigger wheel such as 16-inches is easier to learn on because it's more stable. But besides learning, a 14-inch wheel is also appreciated and used by advanced riders.

I agree that an 18-inch wheel is not for beginners.

I still prefer my KS14C around town because it's more nimble and easier to pick up when needed, for example to take up the stairs on Metro or put into a shopping cart. I can see the benefits of a KS18 or Monster for really long rides (especially if you can sit on it) but I don't generally do that enough to justify buying one. A KS18  wouldn't be practical at all for the 4-block trip to my local supermarket and would fill most of the shopping cart!

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6 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

In my opinion a bigger wheel such as 16-inches is easier to learn on because it's more stable. But besides learning, a 14-inch wheel is also appreciated and used by advanced riders.

I agree that an 18-inch wheel is not for beginners.

I agree... The higher agility of a 14" wheel makes it more challenging to learn. 

For a beginner, a 16" wheel would be the best place to start. 

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1 hour ago, Keith said:

It is the sort of riding you intend to do and the sort of terrain you are going to do it in that should decide the wheel size you go for- not necessarily how many hours of experience you have under your belt.

100% definitely yes! 

And the rider's size / weight too. 

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1 hour ago, nute said:

...but it is nice to see the manufacturers on this forum rather than just ignoring it. 

Other than using it as a free advertising platform, they do ignore it.

 If you'll notice, they just pop up now and then to inform us of something they have "decided," like, "no Aliexpress, overseas", "we will have a new wheel in a few months", "this is how to learn EUC".

 There's no active engagement, just pop up, make a statement, go away again. If they were the tinyist bit smart, and business/customer oriented, they would reach out to someone like @Jason McNeil and pick his brains for what the west wants, not fight him at every turn, he's a free market research tool for North America and Europe, and they are too arrogant and superior to recognise that.  I say "free". Im sure Jason would feel amply rewarded by not having to fight for everything with them.

Edited by Smoother
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On 12/29/2017 at 5:32 PM, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I agree... The higher agility of a 14" wheel makes it more challenging to learn. 

For a beginner, a 16" wheel would be the best place to start. 

Every wheel has their own balance and sensitivity characteristics.  I never thought my balance would be diminished switching from my 10” Mten3 to the 16” ACM. Should be easier right? Not is my case. I’m sure riding the ACM in 2” of snow has an impact but it is a bit frustrating. 

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On 2017/12/30 at 12:17 AM, Marty Backe said:

In my opinion a bigger wheel such as 16-inches is easier to learn on because it's more stable. But besides learning, a 14-inch wheel is also appreciated and used by advanced riders.

I agree that an 18-inch wheel is not for beginners.

@Marty Backe,Hi,Marty.How r u today? Yes it depends on each different individual. My 10 year old nephew started from My 16s and he seems don't like 14 inch at all. However,My sister she says 14D is much easier to control.For me I started from 14D also,It did not take a lot effort to get used to the feelings, later on ......16S much heavier feels much stable,That's true. That's the best to you as far as it fits you well?!:wub:

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On 2017/12/30 at 10:38 AM, Smoother said:

 

If you want to do business in the west learn good  western business practices?! Yes,This is definitely a correct philosophy,except all the swearing!!!

Edited by Flora Yuan
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43 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

It is great to see you participating in this forum though, and if any of our input results in benefit to our wheels or our community,  it would be fantastic !

 

2 hours ago, Flora Yuan said:

If you want to do business in the west learn good  western business practices?! Yes,This is definitely a correct philosophy,except all the swearing!!!

Whilst I’m sure all of us agree with @The Fat Unicyclist above that we would REALLY like to see much more input to this forum from manufacturers like KingSong (whose wheels, all of us have great respect for) the thing is @Flora Yuan that the “elephant in the room” is that video you posted - it is truly dreadful and does not, as you posted it, show KingSong in a very good light!

I do not think KingSong made it? It looks like it is from one of your distributors, but not only, as all the posts above show, is it’s advice on how to choose a wheel very, very poor, but so is its advice on how to learn to ride - that is advice from someone who can ride well and has completely forgotten how they learned. When you are first learning your shins and lower leg muscles are soft and easily bruised, the last thing someone who has never ridden should be doing is all that one footed stuff - it will hurt like hell and put the new rider off. The new rider needs to get both feet on the wheel and, ideally with someone (or at least something) to hold on to, learn the basics of balancing and foot position.

Once they can ride the wheel OK - by which time the calf muscles and shins will have hardened up and they know where to position their feet correctly THEN is the time to practice mounting the wheel and THEN the exercises shown are useful.

Edited by Keith
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47 minutes ago, Flora Yuan said:

Tks,@Keith, Why you don't think it is not King Song but some distributors made the video?! :)

Maybe because the people don't look Chinese.  And because it's a grab from Facebook, however, it's obvious that King Song did the translation into chinglish.

"If you want to do business in the west learn good  western business practices?! Yes,This is definitely a correct philosophy,except all the swearing!!!"

EXCUSE ME! One "bullshit" and one "for God's sake" does not constitute  anything that could be described as "ALL the swearing". Once again, you've read everything, and understood nothing.  Dose anyone actually LISTEN, in China?

Edited by Smoother
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2 hours ago, Flora Yuan said:

Tks,@Keith, Why you don't think it is not King Song but some distributors made the video?! :)

Because, they do not look Chinese, but also I could not believe KingSong would give such bad advice!

Also, I may be wrong, but I think I’ve seen that girl before and she has given bad advice before like, for example, I think I’ve seen her insisting that if the wheel is to be stored unused for the winter it should be stored fully charged, and recharged every month - which is very poor advice for Lithium Ion batteries.

Edited by Keith
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Wow, these two veteran members should take a cold shower and calm down.

To add a viewpoint from another perspective, i think the video is OK, if i would need more precise instructions on how to do things, i could probably find it in a video on youtube.
But as a video that clearly is taking on one of the highest blocking points of buying a EUC, the difficulties to learn to ride one, i think it does a good job, you can argue all day on what is wrong or right but the fact is people learn in their own way, the video makes it look easy, and fun! 

And also I really appreciate seeing KingSong making videos like this (where are the other Brands videos), this tells me King Song is still very active and pushing the busisness in the right direction.

and Keith, bashing for something you think you'v seen, is a little silly, right?

And please stop with this chinese bashing, western business practises are not flawless, and i cant even imagine the challenges in operating a world wide business.

And for the other point on that i do agree, is the lack of ambition finishing a project to the end (manual, android/ios appliciation), I work in a large factory myself, we struggle with the same, putting lo-prio tasks on a long term list, so i somewhat understand, its just lack of leadership in this area.

I think to see a company open up to their loyal customers and "crowdsourcing", would be a step in the right direction in 2018,

so come on guys, even if you are frustrated, let's skip  the hostile and de-constructive tone for criticism.

how about sending them a "non chinglish" version of their manual, make a nice powerpoint guide how to store Li-ion Batteries, put that frustration energy to use!

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Send them a non "chinglish manual" ?
Well why not  - afterall we ve just been told why we should pay about twice the price for ks wheels ( services...) and yep why not provide the manual?
I definitely don't think veterans are arrogant, western market is different and we guys also are. 
No chinese bashing - ks is definitely not the first chinese company to protect a contract. You just try to sell in China some expensive products with a so-called combo "reseller service  + advices+ how to videos" . If the product doesn't fit the market + right price ... sales should be close to none.


Definitely some more care about size, weight ...would be more than welcome. This is our safety.
 

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For the record, I said nothing originally about the video other than King Song has better things to spend their time on, than positing training videos. After all, I don't look to Ford or General Motors to teach me how to drive. And all I said about it afterwards was to answer the question about its origin.  

@Rob Valley , although, posting here takes a bit of time, I'm not going to voluntarily re write the King Song owner's manual or hunt down and correct every voice command, on the off chance they might use it.  You did read my post right? So you read the part where  I told her that we are here to help, just ask?  Well no one's asked me yet. Asked you? 

Please show me the posts where anyone from King Song has asked for our advise,  or suggestions, or help.  My knowledge is not exhaustive, but I can't remember one.

my first KS wheel is in pieces waiting for a new axle. An axle that broke after 1000 easy miles, and 13 months.  An axle that is not being replaced under warrantee. An axle that is not even available anymore.  I'm having to jury rig a newer axle design into my old rotor.  my mainstream dealer and regional supplier both claimed they had never heard of it, despite numerous reports here.  If they can be believed then which is worse, them not keeping up with common knowledge, or King Song being too busy "making" training videos, to inform their official suppliers, of a known problem and their solution? My tire ( a consumable) still has a few thousand miles in it but, the axle? Trash.

The pedals are made of slippery ribbed aluminum. I had to buy boots with extra grippy soles just to stay on it.  Other brands were using grip tape, but, not my model.  

The Unremovable tilt back is all but guaranteed to throw me off the wheel at high speed.

 I have to wear sponges inside my socks on every ride, so my ankles aren't  bloodied on the sharp case protrusions at exactly ankle height.  

The balls of my feet 1/2 hang of the pedals when in a normal riding position. When climbing steep hills my heels leave the pedals completely.  And when descending, my soles flap about.  Not a safe feeling. (I do not have big feet)

The outside edges of the pedals catch on the grounds in turns, sometimes throwing me off the wheel. 

My latest King Song wheel speaks in a strange language,  and the pedals still scrape the ground in moderate turns 

ALL these issues could have been eliminated, or at least reduced, by consulting with western users. FOR FREE!

But you're  right, I should be glad that at least they have taken the time to "make" a training video.  :facepalm:

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