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dmethvin

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dmethvin last won the day on April 15 2016

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About dmethvin

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    Veteran Member

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  • Location
    Maryland, USA
  • EUC
    KS14C

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  1. I always keep my hands out of pockets because it's safer ... *looks at tomorrow's weather forecast, 28F/-2C temperature in the morning* ... unless I need to keep my hands from turning into blocks of ice. I think I'll be wearing my balaclava for the first time this season.
  2. I agree that it's super frustrating we get so little data on the battery, when it is the most expensive part that the first to go in many cases. I think I have a bad cell on my KS14C that seems to have started when I rode the voltage down too far one time. The only way I will know for sure is to open up the wheel, slice open the blue shrink on the pack, and get access to the individual cells to measure them.
  3. Do you have another charger? You could always use that one every week or so to do a full balancing charge.
  4. A 174Wh battery isn't very big and doesn't give a lot of a safety margin. If you travel more than 5 miles a day I'd upgrade.
  5. Thanks for the interesting info! I was just reading about price increases in this article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/transportation/2019/10/18/that-scooter-ride-is-going-cost-you-lot-more/ The per-mile costs listed above make it a bit difficult to reconcile with per-minute charges, but if a 10-minute trip averages 6mph (including stops at lights etc) that's $1+10*0.39 = $4.90 at the new rates. At the old rates it would be $1+10*0.15 = $2.50. So the old revenue estimate there lines up pretty well with the article in Time. The new rates almost double their per-mile revenue but it sounds like they scared off customers, some of who went back to the bus at a flat $2 per ride.
  6. I made this one a few years back, this is my old 16-inch Firewheel in it at the time. Now it holds my KS14C.
  7. Glad you made it through with relatively few injuries. My pothole from hell was filled with leaves.
  8. The power is in the battery, and the battery is heavy. A high power motor is only useful if it can get that power from the battery. You could change the 16s4p configuration in the 14C battery pack to 16s2p and add some filler to take up the remaining space, but it would reduce the margin of safety at lower battery levels. Still, it could be an option if you ride gently. I have no idea whether the battery reduction surgery is possible but ewheels does sell a replacement pack if things go wrong: https://www.ewheels.com/product/king-song-840wh-battery-pack/
  9. Yeah, I doubt it's the board but it could be the battery, which would not be good to have it banging around.
  10. The only thing that might make it dicey is if you're super heavy, I'm only 150lbs and I've never had a hill that couldn't be climbed unless it was too slippery or loose dirt/gravel. If you were on a bicycle you might try to build up momentum headed into the hill to make it easier to pedal. That's not the way to do it on an EUC, which has max torque at low speeds. Start slow and climb slow, lean gently to pick up a little speed if you can. Will's covered everything else.
  11. I ride a 14-inch wheel (the classic King Song 14C) in Washington DC, it's my daily driver. It's great for the times where you need to pick it up and carry it on stairs or stuff it under a subway seat. It's not so great on bumpy streets and sidewalks. I'm going with a 16-inch wheel next time, perhaps the KS16S or updated V8, just for the stability. Some say those wheels are underpowered, but my body is also underpowered and I don't want to drag around a bunch of heavy batteries I don't need for a 7-mile daily commute.
  12. Tariffs are just one more way for the government to pick winners and losers. When we put tariffs on Chinese goods, they put tariffs on our goods. Ask farmers how they feel about tariffs, which have cost them more than $30 billion in lost exports. Import tariffs are paid by all of us in the form of increased prices. Normally we'd benefit by depressed prices on farm goods to compensate for that, but the US government has already spent $25 billion in tax dollars trying to give relief to farmers and more is on the way. So woo hoo, no American is really losing in the near term because the government is putting us further into debt to pay the would-be losers. We'll let future generations deal with this, assuming they live through climate change.
  13. Definitely sounds like a fried MOSFET on the controller board. You'll need to either send it in for repair or open it up yourself and try to repair.
  14. I need to get used to pulling out the phone in situations like this. It was pretty awesome and would have made a great video! The construction workers were excited when I came back through the alley with that wad of money in my hand.
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