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Can I learn this...?


Tom Fagerland
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So, my main problem is that I have extremely bad motor skills, but only in the legs. (This is due to a birth defect that wasn't discovered until recently)

My fine motor skills are fine, and I have no problems with balance per se. 

However, I bought a used Airwheel X5 almost a week ago, and I can't seem to get anywhere with it. Part of the problem is that I have no one to teach me, and really no one to help me learn either. 

So what I'm looking for is tips for learning that aren't the normal ones.

 

Or should I just give up? 

 

I suppose I could also try one of those double-wheel Q-models, but that doesn't really seem like it's worth it, since my main problem is with learning - I know I can ride once I've learned.

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15 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

With out getting to personal what muscles in your legs appear weak? Can you walk on your heels and toes? Can you extend and flex your legs at the knees and hips. Can you squeeze a rubber ball between your thighs? Can you balance on one leg?

The forum members including myself will do our very best to help assist you through this learning curve. Stay positive! 

 

1: Difficult question... It's not really a muscular thing, it's skeletal. Basically I have hip dysplasia, and have had it for 36 years longer than you're supposed to. It was supposed to be discovered either at birth, or at one of the controls after birth. 

It wasn't a huge deal until I turned 16, when I started having enormous hip pains. Of course, it wasn't discovered then either, and for the last 20 years I've thought I have arthritis - which is now true; having hip dysplasia for 36 years gives you arthritis...

Anyway, I'm a bit bitter about all that, and am looking at getting some sort of malpractice claim through, but simultaneously it turns out there are all of these treatment options I never had before, so it's really a good thing that it's been discovered at last...

But that's neither here nor there, it's just something that's happening in my life right now...

I don't think I have any muscular problems, and I can balance on one leg just fine. I also have no problems with mobility in my legs, which the arthritis doctors were always extremely puzzled by, and which should have been a huge hint... 

2: Thanks, this seems like a very positive forum, and from the time I've spent here, I've learned a lot! 

Edited by Tom Fagerland
motility is for sperm, mobility is for joints ;)
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Oh, I should probably add that yes, my "project" to learn using an EUC is motivated in part by me not being able to move easily or fast, but if I just wanted to move around, I would buy one of those little electric scooters, like the Airwheel Z-series. However, I think those look ridiculous, and this looks like a lot more fun. And if I end up learning to use this, and liking it, I will upgrade to a "proper" model. I'm looking at the KingSong KS16 series... A local retailer is lowering prices on the A now that the S-models are coming in...

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6 minutes ago, nute said:

I know nothing about your condition but it would be worth checking that riding and EUC does not expose you to the risk of injury over and above the already significant risk run by those without your condition. 

I would not be put off because you haven't got it in a week, some pick it up really quick, others take a lot longer, me included. It probably took me 3-4 sessions of handing myself along a fence before I even felt I had any sort of chance of going more than a few feet without falling off. If you are trying to learn without something to lean on, so are stepping onto the wheel and trying to roll away each time that's even more difficult (but probably results in better long term confidence and control). 

I found using a support (fence) to get mounted and then using it as a balance aid helped me eventually get the hang of riding in a straight line. Then I added in cornering and then worked on hopping on with no prop (im still shit at that). I started in Jan 2016 and id guess it was 3-4 weeks before I felt safe and competent riding/turning on level ground.

Don't be disheartened, stick at it and in sure it will click. It really is worth the effort and its so much fun once you crack it.

Oh, it won't. In fact, if I was to break a hip, I would be better off than most of you, since an operation in that area is already under consideration ;)

Thanks for the comforting - I have tried both with a railing, and without. With a railing I can move alongside it without touching more than once every second or so, which is a start... I try not to lean on the railing, but of course it's so easy to avoid faceplanting by just adjusting eeeever so little...

The problem is that I don't have a railing available close to home, so here I just try to hop, as described in Ombre's (fantastic, by the way) book. And as it turns out, that method doesn't work for me at all. 

 

Edited by Tom Fagerland
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I suppose you are looking for one with seat, maybe then you can ride without exhaust your legs. But there are one big problem if you have to carry it. 

If you plan is ride slow and easy I think it can be a great idea

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22 minutes ago, Demargon said:

I suppose you are looking for one with seat, maybe then you can ride without exhaust your legs. But there are one big problem if you have to carry it. 

If you plan is ride slow and easy I think it can be a great idea

I might, but it seems like that would be more difficult to use... 

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38 minutes ago, Tom Fagerland said:

The problem is that I don't have a railing available close to home, so here I just try to hop, as described in Ombre's (fantastic, by the way) book. And as it turns out, that method doesn't work for me at all. 

To be honest, from the descriptions of what you CAN do, I'm wondering if you are struggling as much because you THINK you have a problem as actually due to any problem? Learning to ride an EUC is as much an act of faith in yourself as anything else.

Getting your feet in the right place is key I.e. As @Ombresays with your ankle bone centred so your centre of gravity aligns with the wheels - I.e. Your toes should overhang the peddles more than your heels do.

One way of doing that is by using a railing etc, but a much better way is to have a friend support you and run alongside you to help you balance. Once you are managing to move faster than a friend can jog alongside you then you will not have any trouble balancing as it gets way easier the faster you are going.

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2 hours ago, Tom Fagerland said:

1: Difficult question... It's not really a muscular thing, it's skeletal. Basically I have hip dysplasia, and have had it for 36 years longer than you're supposed to. It was supposed to be discovered either at birth, or at one of the controls after birth.

I treat kiddos weekly with hip dysplasia. Yes it does need to be caught early. Pediatricians check for the Hip Click sign on a routine basis even 36 years ago.

 

2 hours ago, Tom Fagerland said:

It wasn't a huge deal until I turned 16, when I started having enormous hip pains. Of course, it wasn't discovered then either, and for the last 20 years I've thought I have arthritis - which is now true; having hip dysplasia for 36 years gives you arthritis...

Ugh. So sorry your pediatrician never diagnosed it. Many older patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) that were left untreated do end up having some form of surgical intervention which it sounds like sure your orthopedist has already discussed.

2 hours ago, Tom Fagerland said:

I don't think I have any muscular problems, and I can balance on one leg just fine.

Then that is the leg you will want to mount the wheel first to reduce the initial forces on your affected hip.

Edited by Rehab1
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1 hour ago, Keith said:

To be honest, from the descriptions of what you CAN do, I'm wondering if you are struggling as much because you THINK you have a problem as actually due to any problem? Learning to ride an EUC is as much an act of faith in yourself as anything else.

Getting your feet in the right place is key I.e. As @Ombresays with your ankle bone centred so your centre of gravity aligns with the wheels - I.e. Your toes should overhang the peddles more than your heels do.

One way of doing that is by using a railing etc, but a much better way is to have a friend support you and run alongside you to help you balance. Once you are managing to move faster than a friend can jog alongside you then you will not have any trouble balancing as it gets way easier the faster you are going.

It's difficult to say why I haven't had any luck so far, but from what you guys have said, it just seems like I haven't "clicked" yet... 

This thread has helped me believe I can do it, though, so you might be on to something. 

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1 hour ago, Rehab1 said:

I treat kiddos weekly with hip dysplasia. Yes it does need to be caught early. Pediatricians check for the Hip Click sign on a routine basis even 36 years ago.

 

Ugh. So sorry your pediatrician never diagnosed it. Many older patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) that were left untreated do end up having some form of surgical intervention which it sounds like sure your orthopedist has already discussed.

Then that is the leg you will want to mount the wheel first to reduce the initial forces on your affected hip.

1: Yeah, my mom even remembers asking why my feet were angled outwards, but doesn't remember what they said. Clearly not "Oh, we should probably check that"...

2: We're not at that stage yet, need to take more images and stuff, then there's talk of physical therapy. There are also waiting lists to consider..

3: Right leg it is. 

 

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I have definitely had to put much more effort and training than the average rider to learn how to ride. I guess I needed 30-40 hours or so before being able to ride a distance of several kilometers and not losing balance. All of my friends who I introduced to my wheel learnt to ride faster than I did. But it's a remarkable feeling once you notice you can ride on and on and don't have to jump off anymore :)

Good luck!

 

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Good luck and keep going! It will come with time and patience as you train your mind and body. Most of us have had "this is fricking impossible!" moments early in our learning. I learned in a narrow hallway, took several weeks of daily practice, actually longer than I think it would have taken in a more open space, since going slow on an EUC is much more difficult than going a bit faster. Be sure to work on your stopping and starting, that is usually a significant hurdle as well that requires lots of practice. And lastly, once you do get comfortable riding, starting, and stopping, guard against overconfidence with speed or uneven pavement/terrain. Many of us have suffered overlean-style crashes, especially on less powerful wheels, once we get comfortable and start pushing things. 

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Yeah, the overlean sounds horrible... I imagine at the speeds these things are capable of (or not really capable of, considering) it happens so fast you don't really have a chance to guard your head with your hands, even...

Don't worry, before I get to that point I will get a helmet.

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On 7/29/2017 at 7:55 AM, Tom Fagerland said:

So, my main problem is that I have extremely bad motor skills, but only in the legs. (This is due to a birth defect that wasn't discovered until recently)

My fine motor skills are fine, and I have no problems with balance per se. 

However, I bought a used Airwheel X5 almost a week ago, and I can't seem to get anywhere with it. Part of the problem is that I have no one to teach me, and really no one to help me learn either. 

So what I'm looking for is tips for learning that aren't the normal ones.

 

Or should I just give up? 

 

I suppose I could also try one of those double-wheel Q-models, but that doesn't really seem like it's worth it, since my main problem is with learning - I know I can ride once I've learned.

If you have access to a rolling walker, such as the type a person who is supposed to use in order limit weight bearing after an injury and supplement balance, you have a great training aid.  You would need to max out the height on it but it would provide stabilization while you developed skill and confidence.

Of course, you would look ridiculous, which is part of riding and EUC anyway, so with the walker, you develop some emotional callouses as well :).

I started on an In-motion v3 with dual wheels.  It is easier to learn on, but not by much.

 

rolling.PNG

Edited by Pard
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11 minutes ago, steve454 said:

Some people have used shopping carts to get started.Image result for shopping cart

Not sure if you are serious, but hey, but if you have one available and you are hitting a learning plateau, why not!

Anything to get you past that invisible barrier between fledgling to full fledged EUC flyer :)

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