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How do you survive the winter?

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On 12/6/2018 at 12:32 PM, houseofjob said:

Lol, as the majority of the NYC ridership doesn't stop riding just because it's cold outside,

Same is true in DC. DC riders go hard hustling and bustling year-round on their personal mobility devices. Not even rain slows the riding. Snow or ice precipitation is the main thing that will though, and only until it is moved from the road and conditions less icy. 

Now that I've talked about DC riders; let's talk about me and my individual preferences apart from general riding behavior in my city. I personally dislike riding in the cold too much, and find that I ride less in the winter. I am good if it's dry, no precip, and at least 30F. However,  the closer to 30F it is, the shorter my rides. I rode more last winter due to an unusually mild climate. This year is already colder and the predictions for seasonal snow accumulations more harsh. So I imagine that the XL that I am expecting to take possession of on Tuesday will do a fair bit of garage queen type posing. 

I am good for riding if it's at least 30-35F. If it gets into the 20s and teens I am done. I don't even want to be outside when it's that cold. All the bike and e-scooter commuters I see around my city riding in those sorts of temperatures blow my mind. I think to myself; y'all are crazy.

I get it. They are commuters. There is really no point to owning a car in Washington so these people don't own them. If they own them they are probably afraid to lose their street parking spaces at home, or don't want to pay for parking at work so they don't use them during the week. 

 

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Our winter weekend was 68F. I got out for one good (>10mile) ride. :)

I don't feel bad about not wanting to ride at 40F. You guys that ride in cold/wet/frozen weather are nutz.

 

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1 hour ago, Circuitmage said:

Our winter weekend was 68F. I got out for one good (>10mile) ride. :)

I don't feel bad about not wanting to ride at 40F. You guys that ride in cold/wet/frozen weather are nutz.

It is my commute, and any other way of commuting for me takes at least twice as long so I'm kind of stuck with it even on the bad days. I think of it as a good thing though, because I am much more stable on the wheel from learning to handle all of the slippery conditions.

Plus the rep you get around town for being brave enough to ride around on one wheel in the winter is off the charts.:)

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I'm always surprised when I read about people in colder climates not wanting to ride once it gets cold.  Temperature has very little impact on my riding.  Maybe it's because I am suited up like a snowmobiler?  I have a Canada Goose Expedition parka and ski pants that keeps me toasty.  

I actually have come to believe that EUCs are especially valuable for people in cold weather.  The fact you bring your wheel inside with you when you're done riding means you avoid the problem of having batteries in the cold that plagues other battery-operated vehicles.  It was a major factor in my decision to get a EUC.  

I find I enjoy riding in cold weather even more because there aren't other people on bicycles/e-bikes/scooters sharing the road.  

The only thing that stops me is rain and road conditions.  Icy roads are far rarer than people seem to think.  There was only a few weeks last winter that I didn't ride, max.  Maybe two weeks.  

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Cold, no .... lack of traction from the tire being cold .. a little. Running electronics outside their spec ... when you're counting on those electronics to not measure your length on the ground at 20mph ... very much. My Glide 2 manual says it's fine down to -10c.  After that ... I'll take the car. Wouldn't mind a softer rubber compound either.

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22 hours ago, mezzanine said:

The only thing that stops me is rain and road conditions.  Icy roads are far rarer than people seem to think.  There was only a few weeks last winter that I didn't ride, max.  Maybe two weeks

I'd only add to this that most icy conditions are much easier to manage than one would think. The only days that are really challenging is when winter rain falls and leaves your entire journey covered in a sea of smooth, glassy, ice. But those days are difficult for everyone -- cars, pedestrians and crazy electric unicycle riders alike.

Edited by winterwheel

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The darkness is getting to me more than the weather... I'm pretty into Techwear so layering up the Climate Armor is no problem here :efee6b18f3:

Hardest part of the cold so far is voltage sag. I've had some early beeping on the coldest of days. So when temps dip below freezing I back off the speed a bit. Also, the MSX tire gets rock hard after a few minutes in those temps (the soles of your sneakers will too = less grip)

Ice tends to pool around intersection corners in the early mornings 

Fogging in your goggles/visor at stop lights can be annoying but there are solutions 

Only a few full finger glove options with splints

Wind-blocking underwear may be a good investment. Esp. if you're riding out to a girl's crib...

Your aux electronics will also drain faster... Bluetooth speakers, Lights 

I've been commuting every single day since I've started. Rain or Shine. First day of winter in 2 more. Might have to pair the Balaclava AND my gaiter :ph34r:

Protect Ya Neck!

Edited by dieterGRAMS

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1 minute ago, dieterGRAMS said:

I've been commuting every single day since I've started. Rain or Shine. First day of winter in 2 more. Might have to pair the Balaclava AND my gaiter :ph34r:

Awesome!

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The most annoying winter issue I'm running into has been trying to find the right gloves that will go over my wrist guard.  I have both the flexmeter and hired hands and it's hard to get a pair of gloves/mitts to go over them.  Last winter I wore a pair of wool gloves that I could stretch the hell out of, but ended up spending $ on a couple of nicer pairs of gloves that I thought would work in size XL, but are still too small. 

Wearing thin gloves under my hired hands right now, but they're not going to cut it when the real cold hits.  

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20 minutes ago, mezzanine said:

The most annoying winter issue I'm running into has been trying to find the right gloves that will go over my wrist guard.  I have both the flexmeter and hired hands and it's hard to get a pair of gloves/mitts to go over them.  Last winter I wore a pair of wool gloves that I could stretch the hell out of, but ended up spending $ on a couple of nicer pairs of gloves that I thought would work in size XL, but are still too small. 

Wearing thin gloves under my hired hands right now, but they're not going to cut it when the real cold hits.  

I go the opposite layering: any glove, then cheap-o-but-never-failed-me oversized Rollerblade brand wrist guards.

Haven't found a better pairing for winter, plus you can't slide on pavement properly with gloves over wrist guards.

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3 minutes ago, houseofjob said:

I go the opposite layering: any glove, then cheap-o-but-never-failed-me oversized Rollerblade brand wrist guards.

Haven't found a better pairing for winter, plus you can't slide on pavement properly with gloves over wrist guards.

It’s baffling to me how people think gloves should go over wrist guards. 

Buy a much larger wrist guard size to put on top of your bulky winter gloves! They make a wrist guard specifically for over top of gloves on amazon

Seirus Innovation 5658 Jam Master Cold Weather Over Glove Wrist Protection – To Be Used Over Any Glove or Mitt https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0018BN31S/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_sLVgCb2FFTWJN

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8 minutes ago, houseofjob said:

I go the opposite layering: any glove, then cheap-o-but-never-failed-me oversized Rollerblade brand wrist guards.

Haven't found a better pairing for winter, plus you can't slide on pavement properly with gloves over wrist guards.

Yeah, I guess the answer is to go under the wrist guard.  The mistake I made was thinking that the Flexmeters were small enough to be able to fit under larger gloves.  The other problem being that the Hired Hands are gloves themselves, and not just wrist guards.  I also think I'm neurotic/hesitant about trying other wrist guards, but maybe I'll have to give the rollerblade ones a go.  

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On 12/17/2018 at 3:41 PM, Circuitmage said:

Our winter weekend was 68F. I got out for one good (>10mile) ride. :)

I don't feel bad about not wanting to ride at 40F. You guys that ride in cold/wet/frozen weather are nutz.

 

My sentiment exactly. But, hey. More power to them. To each their own, and all that rubbish. I was out riding today. It was about 40F. I froze my arse off. I guess I am a cold weather wimp. I am okay with that. 

Edited by Lutalo

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3 minutes ago, Lutalo said:

My sentiment exactly. But, hey. More power to them. To each their own, and all that rubbish. I was out riding today. It was about 40F. I froze my arse off. I guess I am a cold weather wimp. I am okay with that. 

You're blaming the weather when the real problem is that you don't know how to properly gear up.  Us Canadians are more culturally adapted to the cold.  

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1 minute ago, mezzanine said:

Yeah, I guess the answer is to go under the wrist guard.  The mistake I made was thinking that the Flexmeters were small enough to be able to fit under larger gloves.  The other problem being that the Hired Hands are gloves themselves, and not just wrist guards.  I also think I'm neurotic/hesitant about trying other wrist guards, but maybe I'll have to give the rollerblade ones a go.  

Yeah, I have a pair of the Flexmeters too, but they barely get used, as they are a bit overkill IMHO, but more importantly too bulky to fit over my sleeves, jacket cuffs, etc.

With the Rollerblade style, I have several pairs (because they are so cheap!) in all different sizes, and they've saved me on all my wrist-guarded falls!

 

I'm also considering getting a pair of Knox Orsa Leather MK2 [Motorcycle] Gloves with their patented scaphoid sliders (just to see), as many NYC e-boarders use this style because they allow for more control feel when holding a remote and/or camera pole. Not sure if they'll be warm enough though....

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25 minutes ago, houseofjob said:

With the Rollerblade style, I have several pairs (because they are so cheap!) in all different sizes, and they've saved me on all my wrist-guarded falls!

Yep the Rollerblade wristguards are pretty good. Saved my ass at 25mph. And the ones Jason give you have Gel in the palm! even better.

I grabbed a pair of EVS wrister gloves and i'll be adding the palm splint off the rollerblade guards. 

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16 minutes ago, mezzanine said:

You're blaming the weather when the real problem is that you don't know how to properly gear up.  Us Canadians are more culturally adapted to the cold.  

Wrong! Dude. The issue is that I do not like the cold, or layering up for it. You have assigned a fallacious cause to my stated preferences. Gearing up properly is really not rocket science. No worries. I ain't mad. 

I will say, lending some credit to your point, that I do in fact tend to not dress properly for the cold when I ride in it because it is always quite intentionally brief. However, I still get the riding itch in the winter and I have this Brand new KS 18XL agitating it; so there will be several brief stints in the cold for me.  

I usually think when it's cold; I will go for a quick ride. I think this causes me to grab wear "warm enough" for a short stint in the cold; a coat, knit cap, gloves. If conditions dictate more than that; like, having to wear a balaclava and cold weather undergarments I will probably think it is too cold for riding.

Since riding is for me a recreational hobby and not a matter of necessity, and since I choose to live in a place that doesn't have 8 months of winter like many of you" culturally adapted" Canadians, I have the luxury of choosing to abstain from riding in conditions that I find to be unfavorable or unpleasant for riding; because in the end I will only be abstaining for a couple months tops. Even then, I will probably get some days in between that I consider warm enough to ride. 

Perhaps if I lived in the Saskatchewan my attitude to riding might adapt to that situation. Since I experience riding as an enjoyable recreational hobby. I have full liberty of defining the parameters of an "enjoyable" experience for me when riding and I seek those conditions in which to ride; period. 

If I needed to ride a wheel or anything  else that could be reasonably piloted in a colder climate, I would adapt, add my moisture-wicking cold weather undergarments, and balaclava, to my winter ensemble and ride.

Since we are partly products of our environments, experiences, and situations, habits and preferences will vary among men; I fully accept this. I am comfortable with other's preferences because I have plenty of proof of my ability to adapt and overcome.

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Avoid the ice, wear extra layers and use fresh batteries in the flashlight at night. 

tumblr_oisbmhizn71turrjgo1_500.jpg

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1 hour ago, Lutalo said:

I ain't mad. 

And then you go on to write a treatise exactly proving my point.  LOL

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3 hours ago, Lutalo said:

My sentiment exactly. But, hey. More power to them. To each their own, and all that rubbish. I was out riding today. It was about 40F. I froze my arse off. I guess I am a cold weather wimp. I am okay with that. 

40f is ridiculously warm to be complaining about the cold, I wear my normal summer gear for that. I don't start adding layers until about 25f or so.:yawn:

Edited by winterwheel

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38 minutes ago, Bob Eisenman said:

Avoid the ice, wear extra layers and use fresh batteries in the flashlight at night. 

I actually recommend seeking out the ice in order to get over the fear of it. If I see a patch of avoidable ice I will ride over it every time. The last 50 yards into my house is a beautifully marbled sea of ice 1-3 inches thick and sloped across the direction I ride to boot. I ride it every single time, including a couple of turns needed to get around the corner and up to the front door. Once you get comfortable doing this winter becomes your *****. :efef585a74:

Edited by winterwheel

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22 minutes ago, mezzanine said:

And then you go on to write a treatise exactly proving my point.  LOL

If you think that I proved your point you may have gotten lost in your own argument? Since, the so-called treatise was over your "culturally adapted" Canadian Coconut. Let me Dick&Jane the "point."

You asserted that I dislike riding in cold temperatures because I lacked the knowledge of how to dress properly for the weather. 

My "point" is that you assigned a false correlation/causation. Not doing something and not knowing how to do something are not necessarily related. 

I find it amusing that you think my so-called treatise somehow proved your ridiculous assertion. LOL

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1 hour ago, winterwheel said:

40f is ridiculously warm to be complaining about the cold, I wear my normal summer gear for that. I don't start adding layers until about 25f or so.:yawn:

Unlike you arctic circle dudes, I am a bit of a cold-weather wuss. Today in DC I think the high reached something like 48F; which is not that cold at all for this time of year. 

While I was out the temperature started dropping rather quickly down to around 40F. I could feel the change and I think was responding to the change; I was dressed for 50F, not 40.

I prefer not to ride in too cold weather, but if the weather is clear and I do I layer up and I am good down to 30-35F; lower than that requires more layering for a ride than I like to do and I am usually not going out with a wheel. My rides are shorter in the winter, but I do ride.

Edited by Lutalo

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5 hours ago, houseofjob said:

Yeah, I have a pair of the Flexmeters too, but they barely get used, as they are a bit overkill IMHO, but more importantly too bulky to fit over my sleeves, jacket cuffs, etc.

With the Rollerblade style, I have several pairs (because they are so cheap!) in all different sizes, and they've saved me on all my wrist-guarded falls!

 

I'm also considering getting a pair of Knox Orsa Leather MK2 [Motorcycle] Gloves with their patented scaphoid sliders (just to see), as many NYC e-boarders use this style because they allow for more control feel when holding a remote and/or camera pole. Not sure if they'll be warm enough though....

“Just to see” implies you plan on falling!! Even if you’ve fallen in the past numerous times, that doesn’t mean history has to repeat itself; we aren’t supposed to be falling off of these machines and thus I hope to never test the efficacy of my protection gear. 

I use a similar glove as that, https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/klim-adventure-short-gloves

Klim has their own massive palm slider that additionally has Poron Impact Protection underneath the palm. Doesn’t seem like the Knox has any palm impact protection, just sliders. The Klim is good for cold weather with the Gore Tex windproof and waterproof layer. I’ve been wearing it the last couple days and obviously hope to never test it in a crash, but can say it’s been warm enough at 35 degrees (100% windproof). The palm slider slides across asphalt easily from my tests, and I’ve hit that area with a rubber mallet for testing while wearing it and the Poron protection is legit. It also has Gore Grip technology which is shocking how tactile the gloves are. I can easily unzip zippers, hold my phone, on my dualtron scooter I can change settings and feel the throttle and brake lever. It doesn’t have touch technology but I use touch stylus’ and can easily grip a stylus and use it on my phone. 

But these gloves are expensive man!! I’m looking for serious longevity, Klim Has a lifetime warranty so if you crash and it “breaks” you’re good for a new one. I’m just hoping to never have to wear bulky ass wrist guards again, especially in the winter over gloves, it’s takes some time to take off the gloves when you’re in a store or something plus you can’t fit your hands in your pockets to grab stuff easily. Oh, and you wrist mobility is limited too!

Edited by Darrell Wesh

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