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Dog walking


nute
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Ive seen You Tube clips of people mowing the lawn on and EUC but does anyone walk their dog on one? If so how did you train your dog not to walk in front of the wheel?

To the hilarity of my neighbours i have tried walking our dog on mine but he's constantly trotting in front of the wheel and I'm concerned that I'm going to scratch my wheel when i run him over hurt him if i hit him. 

As you can see he's not really built for speed -

 

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In Speedyfeet's recent V8 video review he has his dog run along with him as he rides to work. No idea if he trained him though.

Personally I wouldn't do it. I've seen people walking dogs on bikes, skateboards, and rollerblades around here and routinely seen the dog go one side of a bench/hydrant/lamp post and it all goes tits-up. Normally the poor dog is the one who suffers when he is suddenly arrested and pulled backwards. Also seen a dog go sideways after a squirrel which didn't go well for the bike rider.

If you must do it then please use a full body harness (for the dog) and not a collar to save you poor pooch a crushed windpipe and stay away from paths with posts etc.

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I was able to walk a few dogs that just naturally knew to run besides me. Or they ran in front of me pulling me. But I don't do it often because it is very dangerous especially if the dog gets distracted by a cat or something off to the side pulling me with him.

 

 

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1 hour ago, WARPed1701D said:

Personally I wouldn't do it. I've seen people walking dogs on bikes, skateboards, and rollerblades around here and routinely seen the dog go one side of a bench/hydrant/lamp post and it all goes tits-up. Normally the poor dog is the one who suffers when he is suddenly arrested and pulled backwards. Also seen a dog go sideways after a squirrel which didn't go well for the bike rider.

I can not understand how a dogowner can think of running with the EUC and his  dog ON A ROPE!

I have a dog myself...and she loves going with me while i am driving my EUC....but all this without rope!!!

I just have to power on my wheel...and she comes directly around the corner and knows that we are going to run now! so she is not a poor dog...its the opposite, since i have my EUC i am here personnel beloved master :-)

 

but like said...going on a rope i would find a torture for every dog!!!

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The telemetry GPS data is built into Sony's Action Cameras. You can then extract it using Sony's PlayMemories software. Garmin has a series of action cameras where you can get even more information and overlay it on your video.

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...all joking aside I'm very attached to my dog, I'm not going to risk hurting him, he's like our third child. 

@WARPed1701D he doesn't wear a collar, his neck is bigger than his head so it would slip right off. He has a body harness if he needs to be on a leash, which is when he's near other dogs. He's very gentle and trusting to the point where he's oblivious to the signs that other dogs might not feel the same way. 

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1 hour ago, Michael Vu said:

The telemetry GPS data is built into Sony's Action Cameras. You can then extract it using Sony's PlayMemories software. Garmin has a series of action cameras where you can get even more information and overlay it on your video.

Thanks. I had been looking at the Garmins. I wondered if this was one of them.

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1 hour ago, nute said:

...all joking aside I'm very attached to my dog, I'm not going to risk hurting him, he's like our third child. 

@WARPed1701D he doesn't wear a collar, his neck is bigger than his head so it would slip right off. He has a body harness if he needs to be on a leash, which is when he's near other dogs. He's very gentle and trusting to the point where he's oblivious to the signs that other dogs might not feel the same way. 

I feel the same about my dog. We can't have kids so she is our child. I'd never risk it with my dog on a lead and I wouldn't walk my dog without a lead where I live...so no EUC walking my dog.

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It's a catch-22; most places require dogs be on leashes and if your dog is well-trained to the point where he doesn't require a leash then he can use a leash without danger.

I get chased by dogs regularly when their indifferent owners (indifferent to other people's safety and comfort in shared public spaces, that is) don't have their dogs on a leash. My initial instinct is to outrun but that's simply impossible on an EUC, so now I stop and get ready to slap the bitch if she lunges as me. Which of course brings its host of problems as dog owners would never think you're in the right to defend yourself from their aggressive dog.

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I have a labrador retreiver and I walk him every day with my EUC. I don't know why some people on here think its dangerous. He wears a harness, not a collar when i walk him. Controlling my dog while riding takes much more skill than just riding an EUC, but its a simple thing for me to do when you know how. As long as you are paying attention to the dog and the surroundings and predicting what can happen it is easy to do so safely.

I love EUC's but using them to talk my dog was one of my "practical" excuses to justify buying one.

Edited by David S
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20 hours ago, WARPed1701D said:

Personally I wouldn't do it. I've seen people walking dogs on bikes, skateboards, and rollerblades around here and routinely seen the dog go one side of a bench/hydrant/lamp post and it all goes tits-up. Normally the poor dog is the one who suffers when he is suddenly arrested and pulled backwards. Also seen a dog go sideways after a squirrel which didn't go well for the bike rider.

My step-brother used to make his doberman pull him on a bicycle, but stopped doing that after the dog went after a rabbit running across the street and pulled him through some thorny bushes and made him fall. :P

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35 minutes ago, esaj said:

My step-brother used to make his doberman pull him on a bicycle, but stopped doing that after the dog went after a rabbit running across the street and pulled him through some thorny bushes and made him fall. :P

When i first started walking him on it, there was a big learning curve to know how to control him on it. I use to live in an area where he would see rabbits at night, and begin to pull me chasing after them. If this happened in a populated area without knowing how to stop him, it would be very dangerous.

I think controlling a dog on an EUC is much easier than a bicycle. I can lean my whole body to counter his weight, and also use the stopping power of the EUC to counter if he starts pulling alot. I also use a retractable lease so i can easily adjust how long the leach is for whatever purpose i need it to be at.

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22 hours ago, Michael Vu said:

I was able to walk a few dogs that just naturally knew to run besides me. Or they ran in front of me pulling me. But I don't do it often because it is very dangerous especially if the dog gets distracted by a cat or something off to the side pulling me with him.

 

 

1

Looks like you are using your dog to recharge your wheel :)

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7 hours ago, Paddylaz said:

Can anyone explain why huge, dangerous looking dogs don't care about the euc, but the little annoying paris hilton ones go mental and try and attack you?

I can confirm this happens to me too. Big ones are more secure in themselves in seems, whereas the yappy little terrier types have to run after everything that moves. But it's not always true - I have also been chased by one dog of properly direwolf proportions !

I did have a fledgling theory that Gotway wheels, and others that emit a very high-pitched whine whilst on might hurt the ears of smaller dogs, but I now have enough wheelie experience to know that if that is the case, there is no consistency to it, and if that was the case, why are they running towards the noise rather than away from it ?. Whilst smaller dogs do unquestionably chase more often than bigger ones, it certainly isn't every small dog by a long shot - sometimes I can pass 8 or 9 in my ride to town, and only 1 or 2 will go mental. If I'm lucky, those will be on leads and unable to give chase. Sometimes none go nuts and it's a pleasant change ! :)

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I have been walking/running my dog on electric skateboards for the last 3 1/2 years and more recently I switched to doing it with my Segway MiniPro almost every day for the last 3 months.  I never have any issues with walking her on either of those vehicles.  It is such a joy and it's the only way I can get my very fast, high energy dog the cardio workout she needs.  My dog quickly learned to run by my side and slightly in front, but not directly in front of me.  It just takes a little bit of practice and minor training. 

However, I do not recommend doing this on an EUC.  I have tried it once and it's a no go.  The dog can pull you to one side, and with a skateboard or MiniPro that's no problem at all because you have side by side wheels.  On the single wheel of an EUC, any sideward force makes you go in that direction and it's very difficult to stop it from happening as all you really have is body weight to turn.  It's also a hassle because dogs do need to stop to pee and poo on walks or they may stop for other reasons, for instance if they step on something sharp, get an itch or pick up a strong smell.  Stopping and starting on an EUC in this situation is a hassle and can be difficult when you're holding the leash in one hand and a bag of turd in the other.  If you have somewhere to ride and walk your dog where it's allowed off-leash and there is no traffic then riding the EUC with the dog following or out in front can work.  I used to ride along a trail on an electric bike a few times per week and my dog ran out in front of me with no issues. 

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6 hours ago, RooMiniPro said:

I have been walking/running my dog on electric skateboards for the last 3 1/2 years and more recently I switched to doing it with my Segway MiniPro almost every day for the last 3 months.  I never have any issues with walking her on either of those vehicles.  It is such a joy and it's the only way I can get my very fast, high energy dog the cardio workout she needs.  My dog quickly learned to run by my side and slightly in front, but not directly in front of me.  It just takes a little bit of practice and minor training. 

However, I do not recommend doing this on an EUC.  I have tried it once and it's a no go.  The dog can pull you to one side, and with a skateboard or MiniPro that's no problem at all because you have side by side wheels.  On the single wheel of an EUC, any sideward force makes you go in that direction and it's very difficult to stop it from happening as all you really have is body weight to turn.  It's also a hassle because dogs do need to stop to pee and poo on walks or they may stop for other reasons, for instance if they step on something sharp, get an itch or pick up a strong smell.  Stopping and starting on an EUC in this situation is a hassle and can be difficult when you're holding the leash in one hand and a bag of turd in the other.  If you have somewhere to ride and walk your dog where it's allowed off-leash and there is no traffic then riding the EUC with the dog following or out in front can work.  I used to ride along a trail on an electric bike a few times per week and my dog ran out in front of me with no issues. 

One of the key things you said in here was "i tried it once". Learning to control a dog on an EUC is a skill that needs to be learned. I can easily control the pull of a dog when he pulls me to the side. I've never rode an electric skateboard so can't speak to the difficulty on that. My dog is also very high energy so using the EUC makes it much easier for me to get him the exercise he needs.

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13 hours ago, David S said:

One of the key things you said in here was "i tried it once". Learning to control a dog on an EUC is a skill that needs to be learned. I can easily control the pull of a dog when he pulls me to the side. I've never rode an electric skateboard so can't speak to the difficulty on that. My dog is also very high energy so using the EUC makes it much easier for me to get him the exercise he needs.

I think if you can counter the force of being pulled hard from the side by a rope while riding an EUC then you have some Bruce Lee skills only found in the chosen ones.  Physics works against us in this scenario and it can make for a dangerous situation.  Unless your dog is relatively small, I don't believe you can resist that kind of strong lateral force when standing on one wheel without being pulled in that direction or worse, falling over.  I just don't see it as possible from a physics stand point.  If I am riding and someone were to suddenly push me or pull me hard from the side, there's no way I'm keeping a straight course, I'm probably going down and at the very least going off course dramatically.  Only magic powers can stop that.

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3 minutes ago, RooMiniPro said:

I think if you can counter the force of being pulled hard from the side by a rope while riding an EUC then you have some Bruce Lee skills only found in the chosen ones.  Physics works against us in this scenario and it can make for a dangerous situation.  Unless your dog is relatively small, I don't believe you can resist that kind of strong lateral force when standing on one wheel without being pulled in that direction or worse, falling over.  I just don't see it as possible from a physics stand point.  If I am riding and someone were to suddenly push me or pull me hard from the side, there's no way I'm keeping a straight course, I'm probably going down and at the very least going off course dramatically.  Only magic powers can stop that.

My dog is about a 70lb highly energetic lab, and he tries to go wherever he wants when i'm walking him. Its a skill that needs to be learned but nothing that require "bruce lee" talents. Ive been doing it for so long i can control him with one hand on the leach, watching him in my peripheral vision, while texting with my other hand.

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Sansa is about 60#, no problem walking (running). She gets a little distracted walking and has pulled me off quite a few times, but a great way to run her. I was surprised at how well it worked. I usually run her about 1/2 to 1 mile. She quickly realized what we were doing and is good about staying near me.

I keep the leash loose in my hand, and just have to be careful not to run into her, but a 6' leash seems to work ok. Thought about a longer leash but have not needed it.

On couch.jpg

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