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Almost better!


tommybayshore
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I have hardly been able to walk ever since i first got my KS 16S Dec 6th!  The first day i got it i tried to learn how to ride it in a small parking lot.  I never fell off and got hurt but the wheel fired back and hit me in the shins numerous times that day.  Finally after about 20 minutes i could hardly walk, i just assumed id have sore shins and try again the next day... well the next day i almost couldn't walk, i ended up having to go to the ER where i was told i had a "hematoma" right below my knee on my shin area!  Just today is the first day it hasn't hurt and i can walk.  I have never had SO many people tell me im crazy and a idiot and to send the wheel back.  I dont plan on sending it back but i will tell you this, i will wear heavy duty pads on my legs and practice in the grass only until i get the hang of it.  I dont know what pissed me off more, hurting my legs and not being able to try again quickly or trashing my brand new wheel :(  Wish me luck, ill try again this weekend hopefully!

Edited by tommybayshore
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8 hours ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

As a suggestion... And I'm serious here... 

Have a beer or two (depending on your size) before your training sessions! 

It will help you relax (which will make balancing easier) - and (l believe) if/when you have a mishap, the reduced tension will result in less trauma to your shins.

 

:cheers: He's not joking.  Just don't overdo it.  Here's another thought; try not to jump off directly behind the wheel, or if you do, spread your legs to keep your shins out of the way.  Ignore the naysayers, the world is full of people who say "you can't".  Everyone riding these things with ease and style, cannot be faking it.  We ALL started like you.  "I'll never learn this POS" has passed through almost all our minds at least once.  And then, one day you get it, a bit, then a bit more, and one day all this training malarky will be a distant memory.  Then you can look forward to learning one-legged, and backwards, and curbs, and, and, and.  Ok, the training never stops, but the fun factor rises exponentially.

  Besides, you can't send it back looking like that.

EDIT:  Glad your shins are healed.  But whatever happened about the grinding noise from the wheel?  This could be serious.  There is only ONE moving part on an EUC, and it touches nothing except the axle via two bearings.  There's always a little sound when rotating the wheel by hand, but grinding means one of four things that I can think of:

1.  Some foreign object inside the motor.  This HAS to be from the factory, as you haven't had the wheel long enough for it to come from you.

2. Bearing failure, usually caused by foreign object damage.  This requires a bearing's dust seal to be compromised, so I doubt that's it.

3. One of your pedal arms is broken, and rubbing on the wheel.  Easy to see.

4. Somehow you've bent the rotating part, and some of the magnets are contacting the coils.  The gap between the magnets and coils is wafer thin, any deformation of the wheel will close this gap in an instant.  I've never heard of it happening, but you are a heavy guy, equal to about 3 King Song test riders. So I wouldn't rule it out.

Edited by Smoother
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On October 30th, my distracted dog yanked me down onto the pavement on one knee. I was wearing knee pads, but my knee still hurts from that, and I don't walk her with the EUC anymore.

On Nov 7th, I had a bad morning where I "impacted" 2 stopped cars. The first was a truck parked on the sidewalk 1 block from my house for construction work. I didn't mind tapping that truck as it was in my way. :) The second was a car (downtown) that pulled out in front of me at the last second. Even though I slowed down a bit, I put my hand out to brace against the car. My wrist is almost fully recovered from that impact. Both were completely my fault and good lessons for me to learn. You just have to be careful.

You must of been hurting bad to go to the doctor, that sux. There are many people who have gotten seriously hurt on these, and I imagine most of them were just not taking proper precautions. No pain, no gain!

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On 12/20/2017 at 7:52 PM, tommybayshore said:

I have hardly been able to walk ever since i first got my KS 16S Dec 6th!  The first day i got it i tried to learn how to ride it in a small parking lot.  I never fell off and got hurt but the wheel fired back and hit me in the shins numerous times that day.  Finally after about 20 minutes i could hardly walk, i just assumed id have sore shins and try again the next day... well the next day i almost couldn't walk, i ended up having to go to the ER where i was told i had a "hematoma" right below my knee on my shin area!  Just today is the first day it hasn't hurt and i can walk.  I have never had SO many people tell me im crazy and a idiot and to send the wheel back.  I dont plan on sending it back but i will tell you this, i will wear heavy duty pads on my legs and practice in the grass only until i get the hang of it.  I dont know what pissed me off more, hurting my legs and not being able to try again quickly or trashing my brand new wheel :(  Wish me luck, ill try again this weekend hopefully!

Pad the wheel to protect it while you learn. As for hemotoma, that’s just a fancy word that means bruise. You are not an idiot. You are someone that realizes there is more to life than sitting on the couch, and that learning something really cool is worth the effort. There are multiple YouTube vids on padding the wheel, including one of mine (VLog 005 I believe). 

Enjoy! When those that called you an idiot see you flying down the street.. they will be eaten up with jealousy. 

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Learning to ride a wheel by yourself is quite hard. Learning it with someone's else's help is quite easy. It's important that the helper is taking the learner's imbalances and adjusting for it, thereby keeping the learner on the wheel instead of dumping the wheel. Instead of our usual hop on, stagger a few feet, then fall, what happens instead is quality time on the wheel is given to the learner.

In my experience this method makes learning the wheel so easy, with no drama.

Check out this video.

 

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14 hours ago, LanghamP said:

Learning to ride a wheel by yourself is quite hard. Learning it with someone's else's help is quite easy. It's important ...

I agree completely. And think "get an assistant" is stated too infrequently on the forum.  I've read on the forum about folks taking 2 or 5 or 10 hours to learn to ride; but I've assisted/taught about 10 people to ride, and the slowest learner took about 45 minutes to "get it".  Learning is much easier to learn if you have someone walking/jogging/riding along side to assist your balance as you learn it.

Edited by duaner
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2 hours ago, duaner said:

I agree completely. And think "get an assistant" is stated too infrequently on the forum.  I've read on the forum about folks taking 2 or 5 or 10 hours to learn to ride; but I've assisted/taught about 10 people to ride, and the slowest learner took about 45 minutes to "get it".  Learning is much easier to learn if you have someone walking/jogging/riding along side to assist your balance as you learn it.

l agree about the assistance... Whether or not they can ride is also a factor though. 

Having a person to lean on is fantastic, but also getting guidance takes it up several notches! 

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On 12/22/2017 at 7:40 AM, LanghamP said:

Check out this video.

 

I love how in training videos, these folks aren't using helmets, wrist-guards, etc.  It must look much cooler in the video.

And also, let's put an older woman on this wheel - without a helmet or other protection - and see if she can ride it.

Or, it could be that the Frenchies have much harder heads.  As I looked at the bicycles passing, 5 without helmets vs. 2 with helmets, (and 2 I couldn't tell).

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On 24/12/2017 at 5:46 PM, JimB said:

I love how in training videos, these folks aren't using helmets, wrist-guards, etc.  It must look much cooler in the video.

And also, let's put an older woman on this wheel - without a helmet or other protection - and see if she can ride it.

Or, it could be that the Frenchies have much harder heads.  As I looked at the bicycles passing, 5 without helmets vs. 2 with helmets, (and 2 I couldn't tell).

Helmets are overrated unless you’re going fast or riding near traffic. These are learners doing 5mph. 

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2 hours ago, Kael said:

Helmets are overrated unless you’re going fast or riding near traffic. These are learners doing 5mph

I'd like you to run at 5mph into a concrete wall head first without a helmet. I know you feel that going at 5mph you can react to a cutout safely, but if it's someone's first time on a wheel, I'd reckon they'd start falling and not realize it until it's too late.

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