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Sonic gun could soon have you eating asphalt!


WARPed1701D
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1 hour ago, esaj said:

Copper or other conductive / magnetic metal. Actually it's better if it's "solid" and not a mesh, but I guess mesh is used in wires so they can bend and to lower material costs ("Any holes in the shield or mesh must be significantly smaller than the wavelength of the radiation that is being kept out, or the enclosure will not effectively approximate an unbroken conducting surface."), and when the frequencies are known. A solid metal sheet / plates probably works best.

Ultrasonic is not electro-magnetic interference, but sound waves (changing air pressure). I guess some material that absorbs the air pressure changes and prevents the vibrations from entering the chip would work best?

I understand this, but the concept may be applicable to both in some way, that's what I was thinking.

I'm very much not sure after reading that article that it's just affecting the electronics based on "changing air pressure"...

1 hour ago, WARPed1701D said:

For drones this could be a big weight/bulk addition. For EUC's...well I just can't imagine any manufacturers actually implementing this.

Not a difficult custom mod, though.

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12 minutes ago, Catlord17 said:

I'm very much not sure after reading that article that it's just affecting the electronics based on "changing air pressure"...

Read the original Forbes-article they cited:  https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2017/07/11/alibaba-researchers-attack-facebook-vr-with-soundwaves/#1a74e45613a6

"Using soundwaves in this way is far from new, nor are the researchers' attacks expensive or complicated to execute."

"For attackers, there's the additional benefit that ultrasonic signals can't be heard by the human ear, so anyone immersed in their VR experience will likely be more than a little disorientated if they're shot by the gun, said Wang Kang. "

"The real barrier in mounting sonic attacks is targeting the sound. Sound naturally disperses as it's travelling through the air so you need to be able to focus all the sonic energy on your victim. That's easier said that done, but we've even seen sonic canons developed for crowd control that use highly directed waves, so doing at a smaller scale seems perfectly feasible."

 

Wikipedia on Sound:  "In physics, sound is a vibration that propagates as a typically audible mechanical wave of pressure and displacement, through a transmission medium such as air or water. In physiology and psychology, sound is the reception of such waves and their perception by the brain.[1] Humans can hear sound waves with frequencies between about 20 Hz and 20 kHz. Sound above 20 kHz is ultrasound and below 20 Hz is infrasound"

Edited by esaj
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So basically the interference effect is being caused by the ultrasound being projected at the resonance frequency of the object to be affected?  And if this is just sound, then a sonic dampener should be possible as protection... something to absorb the sonic energy.  But that seems to suggest we would need something that would likely increase thermal insulation for whatever is being "sonically protected"..,.. not the desired effect, if I am right.

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1 minute ago, Catlord17 said:

So basically the interference effect is being caused by the ultrasound being projected at the resonance frequency of the object to be affected?  And if this is just sound, then a sonic dampener should be possible as protection... something to absorb the sonic energy.  But that seems to suggest we would need something that would likely increase thermal insulation for whatever is being "sonically protected"..,.. not the desired effect, if I am right.

So it seems, although I doubt old grannies will be carrying big enough "sonic guns" to actually take down an EUC, at least not far away ;)  The Forbes-article actually states that the research team was unable to make a hoverboard go haywire without installing the emitter inside the casing, but sure, with a big enough gun, it would probably work.

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This isn't something I'm worried about, but it is a curious subject.  If the effect could be caused by something as common as a car backfiring or one of those aerosol boat horns, I'd be nervous maybe.

Since sound absorption is key, how about something as simple as the foam tape we often wrap our EUC's in?  And/or bubble wrap?

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Limited range means, for now, an attacker would have to be right next to you.  My guess is that a model capable of having an effect from even ten feet away would be large enough to hamper the attacker's movement, making them an easier target for either identification and litigation, or an old fashioned, passionate butt-kicking.

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That's pretty interesting Keith.

It reminds me of separate stories I've come across.  

One is that people are constantly shooting at the big passenger airplanes.  So much so that it's routine to check the planes for bullets and pull them out. 

The other is that there are many cases of people using laser pointers to try to zap pilots in the eyeballs.

Human perfidy knows no bounds.

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