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Blueblade

Fat guy on a little EUC

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Cool, thanks both for the advice, I was weighing myself without clothes between 235-238 lbs, so good point about weighing suited up. I was wearing a foam bicycle helmet, and motorcycle  jacket and gloves (handy since I already have them, and feature padded leather elbows/shoulders).

I'll heed the advice and invest in some wrist guards, too.  (And probably knees too). I also have full face street and dirt bike helmets i could use instead for better face protection albeit much heavier than the bicycle helmet.

I noticed wheellog can log data to a csv file, and it has some good details on voltage, current, temp, etc which might be enlightening to study after riding on some hills under different conditions to get an idea of power demands with my weight in this area.  Ive already been riding gingerly due to newness and will continue to do so due to weight after reading all this, as i do seem to be on the edge of safe performance.

Actually its funny but i now feel more motivated to shed the extra weight for the sake of unicycling than i was just for general benefit.  It is pretty fun, and I  haven't felt this way in a long time, kind of like being a kid again or something.

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Awesome thanks for the insight..wow that is pretty impressive with the 40kph for a heavier rider up a hill like that (12° doesn't *sound* steep, but it is a fairly steep hill, I was surprised to see a number that low when I measured a steeper hill by my house thinking it might be closer to that 25° max incline  in the EUC specs...). 

I think you all have convinced me on what I want for my next EUC:  an 18XL, once i get over the price :-) ( lots of niceties too like usb ports and 4x speakers). Just curious, do you find it to be cumbersome/unwieldy to ride on sidewalks/paved trails around obstacles/people? I saw a video comparo between the V8 and V10 where they described the V10 like a large SUV, big, comfortable, powerful, and better suited to open terrain and long commutes, and that he would rather ride the V8 on most occasions around the city-- and the V10 is a smaller lighter 16" wheel vs the KS18XL.

As to the earlier suggestion on studying the battery capabilities, I see eWheels has a good article on the cell types and amperage, etc.  That + some wheelog data on test runs up hills + some work in Excel, and im sure i can learn some good insights.  My regular job involves a fair amount of work with data analysis in Excel or other tools, so I should be able to manage this OK.  I'll be sure to share what I learn here if/when I do...

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14 minutes ago, Blueblade said:

(12° doesn't *sound* steep, but it is a fairly steep hill, I was surprised to see a number that low when I measured a steeper hill by my house thinking it might be closer to that 25° max incline  in the EUC specs...). 

:roflmao:I did this exact exercise when looking at my first hill.  It looked like Everest to me, but when I put my phone app angle reader on it. it said 5deg.  I thought my app was broken.  5deg looked huge to this newbie.

Edited by Smoother
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On ‎1‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 5:37 AM, Blueblade said:

Just curious, do you find it to be cumbersome/unwieldy to ride on sidewalks/paved trails around obstacles/people?

When you first get on an 18XL (from what you are used to) it will seem big and heavy... But after a few kilometres when you have gotten used to it you will find that it is actually very agile (for an 18" wheel). The physics of the size and weight means that it will never be quite as nimble as a smaller wheel, but I can ride mine at (slower than) a walking speed through crowded markets with no issue at all.

And then, when the crowd thins out and the path ahead is wide and smooth... You can disappear into the sunset in a matter of seconds!!!

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On 2/2/2019 at 1:59 AM, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I can ride mine at (slower than) a walking speed through crowded markets with no issue at all.

And then, when the crowd thins out and the path ahead is wide and smooth... You can disappear into the sunset in a matter of seconds!!!

Well that sounds like the perfect combo!  (Of course I am only imagining since I can't even ride my small light Glide 3 to that level yet!) Probably the only real downside to the bigger EUC then is the heft/bulk when *not* riding, but you can't have power+range without extra weight.  It still amazes me the capability packed inside whenever I look at my little  Glide 3, and thankfully (or not) I still have plenty of learning to do with it still.

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3 hours ago, Blueblade said:

Well that sounds like the perfect combo!  (Of course I am only imagining since I can't even ride my small light Glide 3 to that level yet!) Probably the only real downside to the bigger EUC then is the heft/bulk when *not* riding, but you can't have power+range without extra weight.  It still amazes me the capability packed inside whenever I look at my little  Glide 3, and thankfully (or not) I still have plenty of learning to do with it still.

It is a heavy wheel, but then that just saves on buying a gym membership!   :D

But seriously, I hardly ever need to lift it. the King Song trolley handle is one of the best designs - it rolls smoother than my luggage (and that was made by Porsche). When I do have to lift it though (eg. in or out of the car), it isn't too bad... But then people tell me that I'm not the most petite of riders...   :cry2:

Edited by The Fat Unicyclist

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On 1/26/2019 at 7:48 AM, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I ride my 18L home (up that 1 km slope at 12°) at 40 km/h.

Video please :)

with telemetry :ph34r:

Edited by Smoother

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2 hours ago, Smoother said:

Video please :)

with telemetry :ph34r:

Sorry @Smoother he video isn't going to happen, as I'm not prepard to try to manage a camera while riding at that speed. 

But I will work on some telemetry...

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22 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

Sorry @Smoother he video isn't going to happen, as I'm not prepard to try to manage a camera while riding at that speed. 

But I will work on some telemetry...

Your wife has hands, she can hold the camera :mellow:

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2 minutes ago, Smoother said:

Your wife has hands, she can hold the camera :mellow:

Good point... I will work on it. 

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6 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

Good point... I will work on it. 

It would also be excellent marketing for your store; assuming it doesn't end in a face plant, but you could always edit that part out.

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One thing I want to mention regarding the wheel requirements is perspective. My first wheel just a few years ago was the Lhotz, 340Wh battery, ~500W motor. Granted I ”only” weigh 200lbs, but the wheel was a life changer for me. There were no 2000W wheels available, so no-one expected to zoom up hills at 40km/h. Or even at 20km/h. 

Your wheel has full potential in creating you a marvellous hobby/lifestyle, which you will describe as being the funnest thing one can do.

The key thing is when you watch Youtube videos on 150lbs riders flying on 2000W wheels, you understand that you will not be able to do anything even close to what they do regarding acceleration, speed, and hills. If this leaves an itch, THEN you need a powerful new generation wheel.

Whichever wheel you ride, ALWAYS gear up. Every single time you step on. Surprises and accidents are just that, surprises. Low power wheel is easier to ditch you at a bump, while high power wheels provoke faster speeds. Don’t question the need to gear up and it won’t feel like a burden.

And welcome amongst the funnest thing one can do!

Edited by mrelwood
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3 hours ago, mrelwood said:

One thing I want to mention regarding the wheel requirements is perspective. My first wheel just a few years ago was the Lhotz, 340Wh battery, ~500W motor. Granted I ”only” weigh 200lbs, but the wheel was a life changer for me. There were no 2000W wheels available, so no-one expected to zoom up hills at 40km/h. Or even at 20km/h. 

Your wheel has full potential in creating you a marvellous hobby/lifestyle, which you will describe as being the funnest thing one can do.

The key thing is when you watch Youtube videos on 150lbs riders flying on 2000W wheels, you understand that you will not be able to do anything even close to what they do regarding acceleration, speed, and hills. If this leaves an itch, THEN you need a powerful new generation wheel.

Whichever wheel you ride, ALWAYS gear up. Every single time you step on. Surprises and accidents are just that, surprises. Low power wheel is easier to ditch you at a bump, while high power wheels provoke faster speeds. Don’t question the need to gear up and it won’t feel like a burden.

And welcome amongst the funnest thing one can do!

Having evolved with this silly EUC technology too, I completely understand your comments... In fact, I still have an LHOTZ charged and ready to go about 5 metres away (in case of an apocalypse)!

But coming from that "era" the new-found freedom of a powerful 18XL makes me appreciate what lighter riders used to experience, and possibly just a little bit of jealousy of what they can now achieve - In fact, one of my customers recently told me that he completed a 100 km ride and still had 20% left in his battery... Something I will never be able to do.

But the freedom and enjoyment I get from what someone my size can do on a "super" EUC... Simply unequalled, in every way!!!

And yes, that is partly because I can relax more because I am geared up.

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5 hours ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

the new-found freedom of a powerful 18XL makes me appreciate what lighter riders used to experience

Absolutely! What I do with my MSX compared to the Lhotz, it's a different hobby. Like cross-country skiing vs slalom. But I think this thread needed another aspect next to the ones concentrating in the OP's new wheel being underpowered and dangerous. Once he gets properly bitten, a new wheel is in the cart in a month anyway...

Ps. The GW Nikola might be a really nasty hill climber for hefty riders. MSX motor and battery, but even more (!) torque from the smaller wheel.

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@mrelwood You have over 9,200km on your 16s? !!!!! and over 18,000km on PEVs !  Fluck, that's a lot!

Any maintenance/repair issues with those 9,200km?

Edited by Smoother

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59 minutes ago, Smoother said:

@mrelwood You have over 9,200km on your 16s? !!!!! and over 18,000km on PEVs !  Fluck, that's a lot!

Yep. What can I say... I like riding. 😁 My car gets a lot less distance in a year!

Quote

Any maintenance/repair issues with those 9,200km?

On the KS16 I snapped a critical pedal column bolt ”already” at 8000km:

Other than that, no. These things are tanks. I am a tweaker however, so I do work on my wheels quite often. If I wouldn’t, I’m sure a bolt or a few would’ve gotten loose.

Edited by mrelwood
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So I've been reading and absorbing all I can. 

I know this wheel has (40) LG MH1 cells in a 20S*2P configuration, each cell can reliably deliver 10A all the way down until to basically empty at 3V, although may be able to deliver more for short duration.  The 2P factor of the pack doubles that to 20A. Limit #1. Ref: https://www.ewheels.com/choosing-an-electric-unicycle-with-the-right-battery-pack-for-you/ also: http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?399799-Test-Review-of-LG-18650-MH1-3200mAh-(Cyan)

The motor is rated for 800w continuous (limit#2) but can handle short peaks "much higher". The battery pack can deliver much more than 800W, so its probably that 20A limit on our battery where we can cut/brown out * some minimum voltage to operate at (... appears to be ~3.6v per cell ) 3.6v × 20s = 72V; 72V x 20A  =  1440W) =  "safe" peak wattage (limit #3).

That gives me some params (limits) to compare my wheellog data to and give me an idea how close i am to it on various hills at various speeds:

Max current < 20A

"Sustained" wattage < 800W

Max wattage <= 1440W

Oh and can't wait to see video/data from @The Fat Unicyclist on that hill climb for comparison!

Edited by Blueblade
Correction

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6 hours ago, Blueblade said:

So I've been reading and absorbing all I can. 

I know this wheel has (40) LG MH1 cells in a 20S*2P configuration, each cell can reliably deliver 10A all the way down until to basically empty at 3V, although may be able to deliver more for short duration.  The 2P factor of the pack doubles that to 20A. Limit #1. Ref: https://www.ewheels.com/choosing-an-electric-unicycle-with-the-right-battery-pack-for-you/ also: http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?399799-Test-Review-of-LG-18650-MH1-3200mAh-(Cyan)

The motor is rated for 800w continuous (limit#2) but can handle short peaks "much higher". The battery pack can deliver much more than 800W, so its probably that 20A limit on our battery where we can cut/brown out * some minimum voltage to operate at (... appears to be ~3.6v per cell ) 3.6v × 20s = 72V; 72V x 20A  =  1440W) =  "safe" peak wattage (limit #3).

That gives me some params (limits) to compare my wheellog data to and give me an idea how close i am to it on various hills at various speeds:

Max current < 20A

"Sustained" wattage < 800W

Max wattage <= 1440W

Oh and can't wait to see video/data from @The Fat Unicyclist on that hill climb for comparison!

Well you now know more about your batteries than I do or ever will about mine. But you don't need to know any of that stuff :D.  All you really need to know is in my first reply to you on this thread.  Those "rules" apply to any wheel, any make and any smallish battery pack (under 900Wh)

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In theory @Blueblade has really done an admirable job in finding out and learning! Even a drop of that kind of an attitude would have saved many newbies from unnecessary faceplants. But:

- The wheel behavior, safety limits and energency shutdowns are managed by software. The developer might have a different idea on what the suitable limits are, be it right or wrong.

- The wattage displayed to the user (thru any app) is not nearly precise enough for any relevant readings. For example, mine shows past 8000W during a medium acceleration on flat ground.

- Smoother’s first reply. :D

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