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mrelwood

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Everything posted by mrelwood

  1. There are large differences between helmet chin guard lengths. My Cratoni C-Maniac has a shorter chinguard and I don’t think it limits my peripheral vision in any direction. The helmet would of course not protect in the same manner than a sturdy long chin section of a DH rated helmet. But it was perfectly adequate (and perfectly functional) for my gravel crash at 20-25km/h.
  2. 16S is my backup wheel, and I normally use it extremely rarely. However, after the 2.01 update the wheel is a lot more fun for me to ride, and now I actually take the 16S if I’m going for a very short run only, or if I have to lift the wheel in my car for example. The riding modes received a huge upgrade! The hard mode no longer feels like it’s struggling to get me up the short, steep and bumpy incline to the parking lot. I can just zippy up the bank, even with my full 210lbs. When braking, the wheel also oozes confidence, and I feel like I could push it much harder. The firmware makes it easier to utilize the fairly good amount of power the wheel has, but which the old riding sensation didn’t immediately reveal. Now, this comes from a tall and a bit heavier Gotway rider, so the experiences and expectations will be vastly different for a light guy that recently got the 16S to replace an even older, very soft feeling wheel. For that guy the old firmware will already feel out of this world hard. And if you are a peaceful 20km/h rider, I really can’t estimate how you would preceive the difference. But some light riders have commented that they are not sure if they can even pinpoint the differences in the 2.0. To me the difference is mindbogglingly huge!
  3. If you bought it from a retailer, first thing to do is to contact them. You received a malfunctioning wheel, not a working one that you paid for. Repairs or refund. If that turns unfruitful, I would try wether battery balancing could still help: 1) After charging the wheel, check the exact battery level, and voltage too if available in the app. Is it 100% / 67.2V +-0.2? 2) If you have a multimeter, measure the voltage from the charger output. 3) When the charger LED turns green after a charge, leave the wheel in the charger for at least 3 hours. Then ride only for up to 5 miles, charge again, and this time also leave it connected to the charger for at least three hours. This would charge any cells that have degraded faster than others, if they are still salvageable. And if that is even the issue.
  4. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    I think London and Moscow might be the 1230Wh battery one, due to the voltage drop. Rio and Sydney are the big battery MSXs. And while the GW current measurement is always pretty wild, reaching 200A, 18000W and 14% battery when accelerating to 35km/h in ”Paris” must be a different motor. Those values are actually pretty alarming.
  5. Very little snow at the moment. What we get gets soon washed away with rain. There could be some snowy or icy patches in the shadows though. Depending on how long for and where we want to ride, we can go west for larger rural areas, north for the Central Park, or go around downtown by the shoreline.
  6. None of the dedicated manufacturers make a wheel in that price range, so if you’re buying new, you are buying a very old model that is dangerous and underpowered. You might want to check the possibility of buying a used wheel locally. But make sure the battery is fine and charges to 100%. From new wheels I guess the Gotway Mten3 would be closest to your price range, but it’s a specialized wheel and lacks some features that are crucial to most riders.
  7. I really don’t know. They haven’t made wheels for years that I’d consider viable, so I would definitely look at other manufacturers.
  8. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    Thank you, @Chriull and @mike, I now understand where the misunderstanding is. Which I guess is why the fallacy remains... This is a great idea! I just might try to cook up something. So, this is where the misunderstanding is. Actual torque vs. the sense of torque. We don’t refer to the ”sense of speed” by just ”speed” though, as it would also cause misunderstandings. Changing the motor shouldn’t affect the ”sense of power” very much at all. I guess people’s experiences on the 2200W motor on the 18XL is the best example thus far. ”Zippyness”? Interesting! Please, do post the raw data! It’ll be interesting to guess. But I am very interested to hear wether it felt any different! Please don’t hold back! The EUCO video still not up?
  9. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    I apologise for off-topicing a bit, but I’m having trouble understanding the exact meaning of the word ”torque” used here at our forum, as the translated terms I was able to find are a bit vague. From Wikipedia, amount of torque = force * distance (* angle). When talking about torque of an EUC though, what does it mean? 1) The amount of force that can be applied at the front end of the pedals? 2) The maximum rotational force the wheel can provide? Since the distance to the pedals and to the tire edge is still the same on the MSPro, the ratio of input and output torque is still the same. So accelerating and hill climbing requires and uses the same amount of physical force as before. The only variable that can be increased is the maximum amount of rotational force the wheel can provide at the tire. But that wouldn’t affect hill climbing or acceleration at all. Unless you accelerate so fast that the previous MSX would have overleaned, which I think someone calculated earlier being practically impossible due to the short pedals. I’m of course not talking about a high speed over-lean, but hill climbing speeds. So why is this increased torque such a favourable feature on the MSPro? Just like there is no point of increasing the top speed to 100km/h if you only ride at 40km/h, what is the point of increasing the MSX torque if it already has more than enough?
  10. It sure does. But they are very different wheels in several key aspects. The laws of rotating mass of course don’t change, the difference it does for braking is just so extremely minute. If you lift up the MSX, it can accelerate to 78km/h (84V) effortlessly in about half a second. We are using about 1% of that even when pushing it. Then the tire weight is perhaps 10% of the motor itself. And tire weight difference is perhaps 25% of that. That would make roughly a 0.05% difference in acceleration... The difference in tire diameter is about 5%. And firmware behaviour, 100%. That is a great point! I started with a 500W Lhotz, but the MSX has made me so much more relaxed, and unfornately a bit careless. It really does steam-roll over almost everything! I am worried about the ”almost” though, since with these speeds and power, it would likely be pretty bad news.
  11. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    I fully agree, I did it on my MSX very soon after receiving. No problem for me either. The problem is that there are a lot of people that truly are fingerless when it comes to doing stuff like this. Many people don’t even own a file. A wild thought... would you let just anybody to file down the pedals on your wheel? Gotway needs to fix that angle. Simple as that. Every review on these demo models will tell them that. Although, they will probably then go down to a 0˚ angle for the production model. Then since 97% of customers complain and they will start shipping regular MSX pedals to hundreds of customers... Sigh. But if this is the worst ”MSProGate”, it’s not too bad, and they are upping their game!
  12. While the question of ”which wheel should I get” gets asked constanty, I think so far this thread has perhaps the best value per post. Excellents points and replies from everyone! Yet, there is not or will not be a single model to point to. After gaining experience you might as well prefer the MSX, Nikola, 16X, or 18XL. All marvellous wheels! And each with it’s own quirks. Actually, the quirks might be the most important point when choosing a wheel; which quirks can you live with? A lousy trolley, discomfort, slow to react, having to replace small pedals, requiring DIY, lacking in speed...? (Although, this method will always choose the 18XL... ) And to confuse the OP... For me as well, I absolutely get the best tickles from off-roading! Both very technical (and slow) as well as faster paths. And I would be extremely disappointed if I had to do it on a 2.5” tire! Due to my technique of using more tilt than twist, I’m able to turn in a much tighter radius on a 3” tire, as well as allowing me to ride slower with more precision. Tire width: Purely personal choice. Check! While irrelevant for the point, I think more than the difference in mass it’s the larger diameter of the wider tire that slows down the wheel’s behaviour. You should consider a 2.50-14 Minicross tire for your 18XL, fitted with 4x9mm screw-in studs!
  13. I agree! While not the opposite side of the world or otherwise too fancy, I would think that it would be valuable to see the place from a rider’s point of view. I have a custom 1000Wh 2.5” 16S with XXXL pedals, and as with Univehje, if logistics work you can borrow it for a ride. I might even have some protective gear to borrow, but just some.
  14. The 16X and Nikola are both great wheels, and both should absolutely bring a wide grin on your face for a long time. That said, if you’ll take the habit of riding fast (which your past activities do hint for), the 16X falls short. It’s not a safe wheel for your weight at speeds over 40km/h. The Nikola on the other hand is a very fast wheel, and if you lack self-control, you can find yourself at very unsafe speeds very soon. But if you have enough self control not to remove the top speed limit (48km/h), the wheel should practically be as safe as any. As @Unventor mentioned, we often have differing opinions and experiences. Learner wheel or not is one of them. For me a learner wheel wouldn’t have been worthwhile, since I was a careful learner. I don’t think I even covered my wheel, and it only tumbled slowly a few times. OTOH I’ve seen a lot of YT videos where the rider tries to go all in, and tries to learn the hard way. Fly or die. They sure scratch their wheels, even if padded. If you decide to get a learner wheel first, prepare for being done with it in a week. And at your weight you should too, they can’t carry you over bumps or at speed. If you get a mid-class wheel, you’d probably start looking for the top wheels in a month or two anyway, since you might be asking from them a bit more than they are capable. If you have the budget for both a learner and a top wheel, then by all means, buy both. Otherwise I’d stick to your plan of getting a top wheel right away. Pad it up well for a few weeks, and learn with concentration and you are golden. Personally, due to the 16X’s questionable power headroom at higher speeds, I’d choose the Nikola for myself. 16X is more comfortable and a bit more practical, but I do like to ride pretty fast, and I weigh the same as you.
  15. They are indeed... unless you tire up! I have no problem riding over 40km/h on ice and a moderate amount of snow. I do slow down a lot in corners though, since I haven’t yet gotten a proper feel for the grip limits. So far it has just gripped great.
  16. I’m starting to feel sorry that I urged you to use the new hard mode... Glad you’re ok!
  17. Everyone would be happy and there would be barely any crimes and no war.
  18. 70% left or after 70% used? Did you buy the wheel second hand? Unfortunately 2nd hand wheels sometimes have a bad battery if the previous owner didn’t know how to handle li-ion batteries. Or if they have failed for other reasons.
  19. Riding in the medium or hard mode makes the cobblestone issue smaller, it’s worst when in the soft mode. When the calibration starts, I switch to a level app in my mobile and set the wheel angle based on that. Even if you don’t have a perfectly flat surface for the phone, just put it in the same spot every time and calibrate accordingly.
  20. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    Me neither. And I’m very used to it by now as well. It’s easy to accelerate past it. I think it feels the strongest if you very slowly accelerate from 30km/h upwards. Especially on a minor incline it can definitely fight back.
  21. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    Absolutely, memories fade. Especially mine... But I’d like to hang on to it being all but subtle. At least the 84V version of MSX still has a very subtle tilt-back at 35km/h, but most people don’t even seem to notice it. But I definitely agree with the original point, MSX was a great launch for Gotway. Ah-HA! This must then be the 20” one they mentioned. MSPro, 20” MiniMonster, and a third. Make it a Nikola successor with a smaller shell and slightly less weight and I just might be buying a new wheel this year!
  22. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    The 100V MSX at least at some point did have capacitors rated at 100V. Just one of those Gotwayisms I guess...
  23. mrelwood

    MSuper Pro?

    The very first MSXs had a strong 7 degree tiltback ”feature” that was supposed to give more stability at speed. But this was immediately removed/reduced. It could’ve been on pre-production demo units though, but I do remember at least three reports/reviews mentioning this. That I do agree with.... Best to buy from a reputable distributor if one has to get aboard with the first batch.
  24. Until I have half a dozen written agreements from persons of the public to pay for my medical bills if anything goes wrong, I don’t care the slightest bit how nervous they are when they see me riding. Actually, writing that I realised that no matter how many agreements, I’m still not putting my ass on the line. I wear protection, perioid. Getting hurt hurts a bit too much for me, and neither I nor the hospital workers would care how my hair looks. So many things can go wrong no matter if one is riding in public, on the bike lane, on the street, or off road. Protection is of course a tough sell for a slow one mile commute, and everyone of course has their priorities. Age and experience clearly affects the opinion on protection. Riding unprotected is a lot more common with young or newish riders. Hang around at the forum enough or talk with other riders and one tends to learn what the odds are.
  25. When not connected to a wheel, CD shows 0.000A. And the charger voltage measures exactly the same to a multimeter with or without CD connected. Of course CD only shows it’s output current, but I’d imagine CD consumption being in the 10mA range. In any case much less than 100mA. I can’t see how the charger could recognise the CD and only not cut off when CD is connected. But this is now a case of interest, so I might have to investigate a bit!
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