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Christmas & B-Day in one!


stevedig
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6 hours ago, stevedig said:

That sucker is squirrely under you compared to an 18'' wheel, especially at low speeds. Tiny, light and quick, tho the faster you go the harder it is to lean that wide tire in a turn. It will cruse along in a straight line with a slight lean as well due to how wide the tire is. Took me a minute to process that.

With a proper tire, it's not squirrely at all, just that Gotway chose the wrong 70/65-6.5 Mini/Mini Pro Tubeless tire to ship on the MTen3 (really meant to be used in a tandem pair).

Been riding with this tire (option 2) for about 2 weeks now on my MTen3, and no issues going fast (the stock tire used to pull me left and right the faster I went).

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Just now, houseofjob said:

With a proper tire, it's not squirrely at all, just that Gotway chose the wrong 70/65-6.5 Mini/Mini Pro Tubeless tire to ship on the MTen3 (really meant to be used in a tandem pair).

So... I put the tesla away, as hard as that was, and spent an hour and a half with the mten3. It's is making me use muscles I don't on 16 or 18 inch wheels or it's making me use them more than I would on the larger wheels.

I find I have to actively push on the outside pedal of the wheel to maintain a smooth turn. I think it may be because the angular momentum of the 16 and 18 inch wheels fight the change in roll angle in the turn. the 10 inch wheel has almost no angular momentum fighting the roll and you have to compensate for that. I'm not used to having to push down actively on the outside pedal in a turn so until i adapted it made my turns unstable as the wheel was flopping back and forth a bit on the roll access. 

I'll look into that tire. Thanks for suggesting it. As I said, I can cruse along dead straight with the wheel leaned over 7 or 8 degrees ,or more, either way due to the wide round bottomed tire. It's a little weird... It really jumps when you hit a driveway or other rise like that at an angle too as the rolled side of the wheel bites on the slope. 

Having said as much, it's an awesome last mile / tight spaces wheel. no doubt about it. I could almost drop a 50c piece on the ground and cut a circle around it keeping the tire on the outer edge of the coin. The 800w motor leaves a little play in the pedals. it dips in tight corners but it responds after a second and picks itself back up. it surges along under me in turns lifting and dropping the pedals but gently so it doesn't feel like it's trying to throw me. i'm sure this will go away as I adjust more to the wheel and improve my control in turns.

oh yeah, and for a 10 inch wheel it strokes right along. Eats hills like they don't exist. Surprising top end. It started beeping at me at about 18 mph with the first 2 alarms and tilt back off. out runs my 16 inch ips easily.

it's official. i like it. :)

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1 hour ago, houseofjob said:

Been riding with this tire (option 2) for about 2 weeks now

Is this a tubeless tire? I can't tell from the info on the pg. 

My mten3 is fresh off the boat and came tubeless. 

 

Never mind. I stopped digging through the fine print and found it about one of the picture titles. The answer is yes. sigh.

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34 minutes ago, stevedig said:

 

I find I have to actively push on the outside pedal of the wheel to maintain a smooth turn. I think it may be because the angular momentum of the 16 and 18 inch wheels fight the change in roll angle in the turn. the 10 inch wheel has almost no angular momentum fighting the roll and you have to compensate for that. I'm not used to having to push down actively on the outside pedal in a turn so until i adapted it made my turns unstable as the wheel was flopping back and forth a bit on the roll access. 

 

I have the same experience with the fight to lean the wheel over on my MSuper, the KS16s is neutral, and the V5 flops into turns. I don't like it and prefer the wheel to be neutral, but depressingly as the KS16s tire wears out more in the center it becomes more difficult to lean over.

I don't think it's the wheel, I think it's the tire. I believe for every tire out there there is one and only one tire pressure where the tire describes an absolutely perfect circle which should give you perfect handling so long as the riders weight doesn't unduly deform the tire. If you're a heavier rider then you just won't be able to hit that perfect circle but a lighter rider can and should.

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Just now, stevedig said:

Is this a tubeless tire? I can't tell from the info on the pg. 

Sure is (though mine was stocked with a tube.... waiting for my valve stem to take out said tube).

RGi5urc.jpg

 

16 minutes ago, LanghamP said:

I have the same experience with the fight to lean the wheel over on my MSuper, the KS16s is neutral, and the V5 flops into turns. I don't like it and prefer the wheel to be neutral, but depressingly as the KS16s tire wears out more in the center it becomes more difficult to lean over.

I don't think it's the wheel, I think it's the tire. I believe for every tire out there there is one and only one tire pressure where the tire describes an absolutely perfect circle which should give you perfect handling so long as the riders weight doesn't unduly deform the tire. If you're a heavier rider then you just won't be able to hit that perfect circle but a lighter rider can and should.

The tire is important, but technique is more important IMHO. 

Natural inclination is to ride with legs flush against the EUC body, but this can be problematic at the extremes of EUC widths (too thin for wheels like V5/i5, or too thick for wheels like MSuper/Monster). 

For narrow EUCs, I ride ankles away from the body, feet towards the outer edge of the pedals; and for wider EUCs, I'll play with that ankles/feet out position and many times split my feet, one foot more forward, one foot more back. Doing so, I personally don't really experience any fight or flop to turning.

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I've spent a good bit of time on an msuper. it taught me to keep the ankles out away from the wheel or bruise the pocheese out of my inside shins.

I actually started too wide. The body is soooo much narrower than anything else i ride I had massive gaps between either side of the body and inside of leg. a few very wobbly turns later I move to ankle grip mode but that lasted less time than super gaps. 

I settled at about a half inch of gap on either side. any more and the wheel is hard to mount as it rolls so fast and the top is so narrow and short you can't brace it with the inside of the shin fast enough. 

I have no doubt we'll be negotiating further on these points tomorrow.

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Except for my MSuper, I have all my wheels set up the same. The MSuper is very hard to adjust and check tire pressure.

Basically my criteria, really my only criteria, for neutral handling (or good handling) is simply the wheel corners very flat through 50-80 % of its speed, that is the wheel is set in the turn and no further input is required while the wheel continues its arc. I don't need to be anything other than even on the footpads, I'm not weighing one more than the other. It doesn't matter if my legs are touching the sides of the wheel or not as the wheel should be perfectly neutral.

I'm not adjusting myself to the wheel, it is simply beautifully and telepathically underneath me behaving itself by rolling utterly on its own while I simply stand there, along for the ride. And I love this because the wheel disapears, it feels like complete mind control, you just think, set, and float.

With my KS16 I can adjust it so it's right smack on for weeks (subject to tire change), my MSuper OK for a fee days (I can't Slime it), and my V5 is the worst of the lot because the PSI is itty bitty 34-36 range.

TLDR; adjust the wheel so it rides on its own and you're just along for the ride.

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A lot of useful information on how gyroscopically stabilized machines handle best is found on this book. 

A Twist of the Wrist Vol. 2: The Basics of High-Performance Motorcycle Riding https://www.amazon.com/dp/0965045021/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_PiCeAbPV1EPC3

While it just talks about bikes and much of it is irrelevant to unicycles, there's also much useful information on an EUC should feel rolling through turns.

 

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