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So I installed Stan’s Sealant to my stock Tubeless tires about 8 months ago after Constantly plugging flats (which leaked air) Now I haven’t had one flat since my install. Air pressure also stays stable for weeks, I only have to check once a month and top off running 45 psi.

its a very easy install, all you have to do is this. 15 mins total time.

1. Buy some Stans No Tube sealant from your local bike shop (latex type liquid)

2. Remove your valve core

3. Use the supplied cone cap to inject about 20ml (1 ounce) doesn’t have to be exact per tire right into the valve.

4. Reinsert the valve core tight. Swoosh the sealant around the tire by spinning it a few times and inflate to 50 psi.

5. Ride it around or spin the tires a few times and you’re done.

I have not had one flat or low tire pressure since. I came home the other day and one of my tires punctured right as I was pulling into my driveway from glass and sealed right up.

enjoy!

Edited by SegwayMiniPro
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I tried the same with a different sealant twice now without success.  Still have a slow leak which means refilling with air every few rides.... frustrating.

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1 hour ago, IRK said:

I tried the same with a different sealant twice now without success.  Still have a slow leak which means refilling with air every few rides.... frustrating.

I waited 8 months to make sure the “Stans” worked. It worked well in my 29er MTB for years so I gave it a go. 400+ miles with zero flats. My tires have about 1200 miles on them so they are pretty worn. With no issues. Plugging never sealed 100 percent. But the Stans Sealant works amazing. Not having to pump my tires every week is also a major plus. I check my air pressure once every month to month and a half. Pressure drops on average 10 psi every 1 1/2 months. 

Edited by SegwayMiniPro
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We need to start a petition to send to ninebot to switch out the stock paper thin tires! We all are getting glass cuts into the tires from all the broken glass! I had enough of that and change to hybrid tires and have not looked back! I have not even added green goo yet...

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MetricUSA. The problem is not with "Paper Thin" tyres, but with tyres that were specially made (IMHO) so that they could be be run flat with relative safety. In other words, to protect idiots who forget to check their tyre pressure, Ninebot has shipped tyres with extremely stiff walls, and very thin central web. I bet they have also promoted this 'feature' when getting the device certified by, for example, UL. The OEM tyres are absolute junk, and unsafe when compared with any decent tyre.

I use the wider profile 2ply tires which fit in normal mudguards, and sell for $24 on EBAY (USA). They are not too heavy, so the walls are pliable and act like the balloons they are supposed to emulate, yet the central tread is solid enough to withstand abuse and give traction. At 15psi, they have a much greater amount of rubber mating with the road surface. They are really hard to mount, however, being much wider than the rims when they are shipped - you will need a compressor to seat them on the rims

The larger Hybrid and knobbly tyres are 4ply, and too thick (IMHO) and heavy  to act as a 'sponge' for road and surface imperfections (look at their load ratings). But at least they work pretty well. I use the knobblies when I go to the local park on dirt tracks, they work OK there.

tyres.jpg

Edited by trevmar

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Good to hear on your success with Stan's.  I've had good success with it as well, but my tire was good for 800+km or so before I needed it. I'd have to look back at the messages to see when I had my first flat.  Stan's fixed it up good, and it held for more than a couple months, but I recently switched to the larger road tires at 1000+ km so the original tires likely will never see any use again.  I also had success using Stan's in my Tube tire on my e-bike.  Also the Stan's I used was already a couple years old, so I'm liking it.  I have some other sealants as well, but have not had to try then yet on an EV.  Next flat I will use something different just to test it.

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On 10/23/2018 at 11:37 AM, SegwayMiniPro said:

So I installed Stan’s Sealant to my stock Tubeless tires about 8 months ago after Constantly plugging flats (which leaked air) Now I haven’t had one flat since my install. Air pressure also stays stable for weeks, I only have to check once a month and top off running 45 psi.

its a very easy install, all you have to do is this. 15 mins total time.

1. Buy some Stans No Tube sealant from your local bike shop (latex type liquid)

2. Remove your valve core

3. Use the supplied cone cap to inject about 20ml (1 ounce) doesn’t have to be exact per tire right into the valve.

4. Reinsert the valve core tight. Swoosh the sealant around the tire by spinning it a few times and inflate to 50 psi.

5. Ride it around or spin the tires a few times and you’re done.

I have not had one flat or low tire pressure since. I came home the other day and one of my tires punctured right as I was pulling into my driveway from glass and sealed right up.

enjoy!

Great instructions to follow.

 

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Trevmar, what are you freaking talk about air pressure??? Has nothing to do with air pressure it has everything to do with them thin skin tires, get the freak out of here...

The first thing anyone who owns a ninebot mini is put green crap in their tires because of the paper thin tires!!! Absolute requirement...

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I was taught pneumatic tyre design when I studied Engineering at University in the '60s. Let me share some of what I learned..

When I look at the wall of my Knobbly INNOVA tyres on my MiniPRO I can see the load rating on each is 189Kilogram at 50psi, so when properly loaded, two tyres would be able to carry 189x2=378Kg. Now there is a possibility that on extreme cornering a lot of this weight might shift to one tyre or the other, but tyres are rated to allow for that. So let's assume two tyres might have to carry the 15Kg of the MiniPRO plus 100KG of a heavy rider, = 115Kg. You can see these tyres are over-kill for a MiniPRO. We can generally make the tyres operate well at a lesser weight by under-inflating them from the 50psi maximum pressure. In 'normal' use the pressure we would need is 50 x (115/378), or 15psi.

Now we can understand why the Segway model X2 tyres are rated at 4psi, and the I2 at 15psi. Obviously those vehicles were designed by a mechanical engineer :)

Edited by trevmar
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12 hours ago, trevmar said:

In 'normal' use the pressure we would need is 50 x (115/378), or 15psi.

This is what you learned at university?

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8 hours ago, Mono said:

This is what you learned at university?

No. We were also taught how to design bridges, radars, etc  :confused1: Those were the days before microcomputers, when Engineers were just trained how to design stuff. Then came the microprocessor (late '70s) and everything changed...

Getting back to pneumatic tyres, however, the job of the air is to act as a cushion, a balloon to absorb impact. The inflation of that balloon, and the rigidity of its 4-ply polymer walls (in the case of the INNOVA 90/65-6.5) is therefore important. A tyre is typically a key part of the resonant system involving machine/rider mass, and elasticity. Reducing inflation pressure, rather than building lighter tyres, does increase the resonance problem, it is much better to produce tyres specifically designed for the lighter loads it will be bearing. But in the case of miniPRO tyres we are repurposing tyres designed for pocket-bikes, lawnmowers etc. The stiff-wall-thin-web design approach taken by Ninebot was quite radical, since it departed from the 'balloon' concept in a quest (I assume) for perceived 'safety' and longer battery life.

Edited by trevmar

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On 11/26/2018 at 1:17 AM, trevmar said:

 

Regarding Tire Pressure, Higher psi 40-50 feels way more stable ... it’s not an off-road machine so lower psi for the mini pro offers very little when it comes to comfort. I find higher range of air pressure to be safer on the road even in wet conditions. The way the minipro handles real life conditions really negate the philosophy of how a car functions.

Edited by SegwayMiniPro

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Posted (edited)

You might have to add more of that sealant to a tire... I dumped a half a bottle in each wheel, and one wheel dried up completely, the other one was full of liquid, still... The one that dried-up of course was leaking air again!

Edited by MetricUSA

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On 1/5/2019 at 3:14 PM, MetricUSA said:

You might have to add more of that sealant to a tire... I dumped a half a bottle in each wheel, and one wheel dried up completely, the other one was full of liquid, still... The one that dried-up of course was leaking air again!

Are you using Stans?

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