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Uno Solo

King Song Touring Toolkit: KS-18XL (18L, ...)

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You might be able to replace the screwdriver and pliers with a leatherman tool, might be a bit more compact.  But it might not have the option of the Allen wrench parts.

Edited by Joker10
Correction

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16 hours ago, Joker10 said:

You might be able to replace the screwdriver and pliers with a leatherman tool, might be a bit more compact.  But it might not have the option of the Allen wrench parts.

Hi Joker10,

The Multi-Angle Ratcheting Screwdriver (Pittsburg) is the core of my tool kit and it has a number of qualities over a Leatherman or other multi-tool.

  • It is an actual screwdriver, the screwing comfort is important since it is the majority of the work done on the wheel.
  • It includes all of the bits needed for working on a King Song wheel.
  • The multi-angle feature makes it easier to put a good torque on the big bolts holding the wheel to the body.
  • All of the bits can be stored in the handle.
  • The ratcheting feature is nice.
  • $8.99 vs $50.00 minimum for a Leatherman.

The Leatherman will have the built in long nose pliers, but with the addition of the 4-3/4 in. Long Nose Pliers (Pittsburg) for $1.99, I have the pliers too all for a total of $10.98.

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On ‎2‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 2:05 PM, Uno Solo said:

Flathead 3 is handy for prying the LED light covers off.

That sounds damaging... I use car trim removal tools for LED covers and shells.

On ‎2‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 2:05 PM, Uno Solo said:

Hex 5mm are for removing the foot pedals screws.

If you get the larger pedals, you may need to consider a longer tool for this, as the screws are much deeper.

And it isn't related, but you should also throw a first aid kit in your bag...

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Great post ! :thumbup: I'm pretty sure that many people having EUCs that are capable of long-range ride are wondering about essential tools & equipment to always keep in the backpack. I would like to share my suggestions based on my experience:

1. Screws replacement. It's worth to replace all the important screws to stainless steel with hex head. I mean the screws that need to be unscrewed in event of tube change/tire repair. First, hex key is much more reliable and the screw head doesn't wear on subsequent screwing/unscrewing. Second, you just need two angled hex keys - smaller one to remove the side covers and larger one unscrew the wheel from the housing. Much lighter and smaller that screwdriver with removable bits.

DSC02938.thumb.jpg.5c20630c7b3ebbdf9ad995eb5f8b5ee7.jpg

DSC03008.thumb.jpg.413e98f3af7822af61b8a34d8a9eb760.jpg

2. Seal & inflate spray. It's worth to replace second spare tube with something like this:

https://najednymkole.pl/en/how-to-easily-repair-punctured-inner-tube/

In case of snake bite or just a puncture it will not only seal the leak, but also inflate the tire in one go. No need to disassemble the wheel. And it last for months without further repair. Imagine you got a flat in a rainy day. It's wet, mud all around... This small can can be a real life saver. It already helped me this winter when I got a snake bite on underinflated tire. Just two minutes and the tire is fixed. If not, you always have the option to disassemble the wheel and replace tube.

3. Ziploc bags. Magnetic bits holder is great in garage, where weight and size is not a concern. But when going for a longer tour, every pound matters. Keeping your backpack light as possible saves your back, legs and feet from fatigue and pain. Ziploc bag is light and can be used for many purposes. So it's worth to have few ziploc bags (in different sizes) in your backpack.

4. Small roll of powertape. Cable ties and powertape is essential equipment of every special forces operator, we're also specials... Powertape is essential in case of broken shell, broken handle etc.

1 hour ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

And it isn't related, but you should also throw a first aid kit in your bag...

IMO first aid kit is a "must have" in your backpack. It's good to have some essential tools to repair your wheel, but you also need some "tools" to repair yourself :) It's worth to have a personal first aid kit that can be attached to your belt in case you don't ride with a backpack. Something like this:

2.JPG

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Bought a compact electric pump works fine, you set the pressure the measure unit and push the button. At the time was in offer 35€, now look more expensive 

https://www.amazon.it/Compressore-Portatile-Elettrica-Ricaricabile-Schermo/dp/B071Y67WGJ/ref=sr_1_2/261-8159701-9216031?ie=UTF8&qid=1549126731&sr=8-2&keywords=pompa+elettrica+per+bici

 

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8 hours ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

That sounds damaging... I use car trim removal tools for LED covers and shells.

@The Fat Unicyclist Your recommendation for the car trim tool is great! You're correct that the flat-head screwdriver bit does gouge both body and the LED cover. I've long stopped caring about cosmetics of my wheel. It is my first wheel so I put horrible scratches on it in the first 5 minutes learning, now after 1000 miles everything just adds "character".  @Seba Your wheel looks pristine, except for the telltale screwdriver marks from removing the LED covers.

I will add the appropriate bit from this Trim And Molding Tool Set 5 Pc (Pittsburg) to my toolkit.

Quote

If you get the larger pedals, you may need to consider a longer tool for this, as the screws are much deeper.

I have the KS-18XL with the larger pedals, and I had already confirmed that the tool has enough reach to removed the pedal screws. I don't think there is much utility of pedal removal in the field, but this tool does have the right size bit and reach if needed.

Edited by Uno Solo

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7 hours ago, Seba said:

Great post ! :thumbup: I'm pretty sure that many people having EUCs that are capable of long-range ride are wondering about essential tools & equipment to always keep in the backpack. I would like to share my suggestions based on my experience:

1. Screws replacement. It's worth to replace all the important screws to stainless steel with hex head. I mean the screws that need to be unscrewed in event of tube change/tire repair. First, hex key is much more reliable and the screw head doesn't wear on subsequent screwing/unscrewing. Second, you just need two angled hex keys - smaller one to remove the side covers and larger one unscrew the wheel from the housing. Much lighter and smaller that screwdriver with removable bits.

I like this upgrade idea a lot. I know the specs for the cover screws so this is what I would order:
Metric Black-Oxide 18-8 Stainless Steel Socket Head Screw
(M3 x 0.5 mm Thread, 6 mm Long)

Do you recall the specification of the larger bolts holding the wheel to the body?

Quote

2. Seal & inflate spray. It's worth to replace second spare tube with something like this:

https://najednymkole.pl/en/how-to-easily-repair-punctured-inner-tube/

In case of snake bite or just a puncture it will not only seal the leak, but also inflate the tire in one go. No need to disassemble the wheel. And it last for months without further repair. Imagine you got a flat in a rainy day. It's wet, mud all around... This small can can be a real life saver. It already helped me this winter when I got a snake bite on underinflated tire. Just two minutes and the tire is fixed. If not, you always have the option to disassemble the wheel and replace tube.

This is definitely going into my toolkit. The one flat tire I've had showed me a few important things about the wheel. 1) The trolley handle is (almost*) useless with a flat, 2) 55 pounds is too much for me to carry a long distance, 3) *the trolley handle is still useful if I turn on the wheel and let it do the work of pulling the flat mess through the body at the possible expense of the tire. Luckily the tire survived, though it suffers 2 notable rhythmic anomalies on smooth surfaces now.

Quote

3. Ziploc bags. Magnetic bits holder is great in garage, where weight and size is not a concern. But when going for a longer tour, every pound matters. Keeping your backpack light as possible saves your back, legs and feet from fatigue and pain. Ziploc bag is light and can be used for many purposes. So it's worth to have few ziploc bags (in different sizes) in your backpack.

I did't find a smaller magnetic parts holder at Harbor Freight. I agree with your weight and size concern and had initially though to substitute a plastic bag. The possibility of spilling screws in gravel or grass made me require a strong magnet. I will be looking at replacing the tray with a plastic bag and strong magnet.

Quote

4. Small roll of powertape. Cable ties and powertape is essential equipment of every special forces operator, we're also specials... Powertape is essential in case of broken shell, broken handle etc.

Is powertape something different than what we call duct/duck tape here?

Edited by Uno Solo

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2 hours ago, Uno Solo said:

I will add the appropriate bit from this Trim And Molding Tool Set 5 Pc (Pittsburg) to my toolkit.

image_16103.jpg

Those look exactly like I use...

  • The one second from the left is perfect for getting the LED strips out without doing any damage.
  • The leftmost one is slightly thicker / stiffer and is ideal to run around the edge of the KS shell to pop the catches.
  • And the one on the right is really useful for removing "well stuck" pads - you can slide it in a little and lever the pad up a bit at a time, pushing it from behind rather than tearing it from the outside.

Not sure what the other two are for... Perhaps you only need those for Gotway wheels?   ;)

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1 hour ago, Uno Solo said:

Do you recall the specification of the larger bolts holding the wheel to the body?

The six bolts that hold the inner shell to the pedal hanger are M6 × 16 mm.

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1 hour ago, Uno Solo said:

Do you recall the specification of the larger bolts holding the wheel to the body?

It is M6x16. And when ordering don't forget stainless washers. The smaller screws are all M3x8.

1 hour ago, Uno Solo said:

The possibility of spilling screws in gravel or grass made me require a strong magnet. I will be looking at replacing the tray with a plastic bag and strong magnet.

Unfortunately stainless steel screws are non magnetic :(

1 hour ago, Uno Solo said:

Is powertape something different than what we call duct/duck tape here?

Oh, it's my fault. Sorry, I missed it, of course it's the same thing :)

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43 minutes ago, Seba said:

Unfortunately stainless steel screws are non magnetic :(

Kill joy!! :angry:  .... You ruined a perfect head slap moment for him.  I pictured @Uno Solo out on the trail taking his wheel apart after 2,000 miles of carrying a zip lock bag with a magnet in it only to realize stainless steel isn't attracted to magnets. :D

The tape trick still works. You leave the screw in the hole and tape over it. Or, fold the screws in tape to make them bigger and easier to find. 

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36 minutes ago, RockyTop said:

Kill joy!! :angry:  .... You ruined a perfect head slap moment for him.  I pictured @Uno Solo out on the trail taking his wheel apart after 2,000 miles of carrying a zip lock bag with a magnet in it only to realize stainless steel isn't attracted to magnets. :D

The tape trick still works. You leave the screw in the hole and tape over it. Or, fold the screws in tape to make them bigger and easier to find. 

Some stainless steel types are ferromagnetic and the link I reference specifies the bolts are mildly-magnetic. I'm certain I would have discovered a lack of magnetism during installation. In any case, the point of this thread is to help others avoid head slapping moments.

@Seba Other than anti-corrosion is there another notable benefit to stainless steel? I don't think corrosion is a particular concern of mine. The other benefits outlined for the hex head bolts are still very appealing. However, I would like to be able to sweep with a magnet if things get clumsy.

I'm leaning toward steel, black oxide would look nice and zinc plated would work well too.

Edited by Uno Solo

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18 hours ago, Uno Solo said:

@Seba Other than anti-corrosion is there another notable benefit to stainless steel?

Well, maybe that they are harder and more resistant to wear. I used stainless steel because I ride a lot in winter where salt is an issue. I also ride in rain. But to be honest, I think that zinc plated bolts would be also good. As you said, the most important advantage is in hex heads.

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