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Engine shut down time when in air


maxkan
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To all I know, if the engine shuts down due to air time it is not just for a fraction of a second but until it is again manually turned on. Which raises the question: what let you believe that the engine was shutting down for a fraction of a second?

You can make a simple experiment by lifting the wheel on its handle and see what is happening. If you are talented you can prevent the wheel spinning out by small forward--backward-tilt-movements and like this it will stay on "forever" (until the battery is running out of juice).

Edited by Mono
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Was the first thing i thought reading @maxkans post, too that he tilted the wheel backwards while airborne, so it stopped (reduced) speed.

As stated by @Mono the wheel only shuts down if tilted forward so it reaches max lift cut off speed - and then it stays turned off!

There is no "airborne" sensing by the wheel - one has to keep the right tilt so the wheel rotates with a speed that allows driving on once on the ground again... Which could be quite a challenge if one compares how sensible it reacts once it is lifted.

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The sensation was as if the wheel stopped balancing itself. As if I landed on a wheel that turned off. I tried to balance for a fraction of a second and then it turned on... Maybe I tilted it back, not sure about that

Edited by maxkan
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5 hours ago, maxkan said:

The sensation was as if the wheel stopped balancing itself. As if I landed on a wheel that turned off. I tried to balance for a fraction of a second and then it turned on... Maybe I tilted it back, not sure about that

Could be something like a normal overlean/overbraking. If while airborne the tilting changed the wheel accelerates/decelerates to some other wheel rotational speed. Once one lands the wheel has to brake/accelerate immedeately to the "real" speed again which can easily lead to an overburdening (max torque over speed limit for accelerating, some other limit for braking?) and by this cannot balance for this short time, until the wheel and the EUC speed are "in sync" again... (1)

Edit: i'm quite sure about this explanation, but if you want further analysis/"security" you could provide logs from wheellog and a slowmotion video of such a jump.

(1) especially if your center of gravity is not exactly over the wheel while landing (or just a little bit in front to continue driving on) so rhe wheel has the additional burden to regulate this inbalance...

Edited by Chriull
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