Jump to content

How to become an EUC technician?


RoboFixIt

Recommended Posts

Wander over to eevees, tell them you'd like to learn to be a tech and volunteer to work for free! You'll do all the grunt work, but if you develop a good relationship you should be able to learn stuff. They mentioned that IM is their biggest source of warranty claims, so there will be plenty to learn on.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Tawpie said:

Wander over to eevees, tell them you'd like to learn to be a tech and volunteer to work for free! You'll do all the grunt work, but if you develop a good relationship you should be able to learn stuff. They mentioned that IM is their biggest source of warranty claims, so there will be plenty to learn on.

Interesting....... I wonder if it’s a volume or quality situation? 🤔

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hellkitten said:

I wonder if it’s a volume or quality situation? 🤔

The comment came from their '2021 in review' video—they were calling on IM to step up their game. BG won the crown for fewest warranty issues!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Tawpie said:

The comment came from their '2021 in review' video—they were calling on IM to step up their game. BG won the crown for fewest warranty issues!

That is definitely not what I would have expected. Mmmmm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all, you should find out which companies in your area are carrying out the repair work. If this is clear, you should contact them and ask what their requirements are for the technician. Knowledge of electronics and mechanics are probably needed. Knowledge of IT is useful but not mandatory.

If you don't have previous knowledge, I would learn the basics of electronics and mechanics using books and videos. If it is possible to take a quick course in these areas, I would definitely consider it.

I would buy both working and broken euc`s and take them to pieces. I would first learn the principles of a working device and then repair broken devices. It is also called learning by doing.

This is how I would start this wonderful journey.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would say:

  • Basic understanding of electronics, as it pertains to EUCs. So you know not to short a wheel, don't connect battery packs with different voltages, and so on.
  • Basic mechanical repair confidence/prowess.
  • Knowledge how a EUC works, which parts there are, how they are built, what they do, etc. So you can understand and deduce the cause of an issue.
    Not that there are too many options - board, battery pack, and the occasional hall sensor/motor malfunction... maybe a broken shell? Anything more specific and concrete you can learn from doing concrete repairs on specific wheel models.
  • Enthusiasm for EUCs and keeping up with the developments in the EUC world can't hurt. Otherwise it might be boring or tedious to just do rote work?

So essentially you just need to know how things work and what you are doing.

The EcoDrift disassembly blog articles are great. If you have a wheel, just disassemble and re-assemble it a few times until the confidence (and speed) comes. You can always ask any questions that come up then. That and basic electronics and basic EUC principles is where I would start.

4 hours ago, Tawpie said:

Wander over to eevees, tell them you'd like to learn to be a tech and volunteer to work for free! You'll do all the grunt work, but if you develop a good relationship you should be able to learn stuff. They mentioned that IM is their biggest source of warranty claims, so there will be plenty to learn on.

Work for free for a commercial entity in this day and age?! Pffff. Money please. Let them train you, for money money money:efefe00999:

-

Asking eevees (or any other dealer, but as you are in Canada...) for more info is certainly a very good idea though!

Edited by meepmeepmayer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know that Cole at EEVEES can speak mandarin.  He is a tech there, and has said that being able to converse with the factory guys directly in China is an asset. So if you have bicycle mechanics background, and basic knowledge in electronics, perhaps being able to speak mandarin may give you an edge. Of course the more you know the better, but I believe if you know how to run diagnostics, and competently switch out boards, and wheels, that should get you an OK start.

Edited by techyiam
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/29/2022 at 12:25 AM, techyiam said:

being able to converse with the factory guys directly in China is an asset.

Really good idea, lucky the GF speaks mandarin so I can totally working on this!

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/3/2022 at 4:32 PM, eevees said:

We're in the process of opening a 2nd location in the Vancouver area that focuses only servicing PEVs.

That is great news.

On 5/3/2022 at 4:32 PM, eevees said:

We would provide full training.

How can you beat that? 

Edited by techyiam
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/3/2022 at 4:32 PM, eevees said:

Hey there! We're in the process of opening a 2nd location in the Vancouver area that focuses only servicing PEVs. When we open, we'll be in the need of more techs to hire. We would provide full training. I would come drop off your resume so we can have it on-hand. 

That an amazing opportunity!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hellkitten said:

@eevees please sayToronto in next on your list........ 🙏🙏 lol. 

We definitely need an East Coast location. It's on our list.. but the US will probably be first. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, eevees said:

We definitely need an East Coast location. It's on our list.. but the US will probably be first. 

😪😪😪

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd love to become a PEV tech, but I don't know if I can move away from the area to do so 😭

It's something I'd feel confident doing, but this area doesn't yet have a large enough demographic to support it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey do you guys think it's worth fixing electric motors in Vancouver or is it better to just replace them?

I was thinking if we can fix PEV motors for under 200 - 300 instead of paying full price plus shipping and waiting for them to come here via snail mail would be worth it?

I think if I get really good at this I could even fix a motor for 150 but idk if that's worth it... BTW Just picked up a fancy new mulitimeter this weekend and it's making a major difference in m workflow! I mean I am learning but taking it pretty serious because I'm looking for a carrier change. Already have a few PEV's here I'm working on and constantly practising.

If anyone in the Vancouver area knows someone that has a some broken motors they want to send in for surgery I would do it for free for the first 3 - 5 but also keep in mind I'm learning but if I fix enough of them it could be worth it! I'm thinking about working on control boards in the future as well, like replacing resisters, reflowing solder etc...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...