Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Okay so here's the thing... I have finally got myself a video camera - to be fair though, they are only just new on the market here in New Zealand, so it's a pioneering effort!  ;)

Anyway I hate learning things the hard way, so now that I'm starting to play with it I'm hoping that some of you experienced videographers (or your film crews) would be happy to answer some questions and share some secrets? And this includes you @Marty Backe and @who_the, after all it's your epic productions that are lifting the bar so high! 

Now I scored the Sony FDR X3000, which has optical stabilisation built-in. So even hand-held video looks really good... Mostly... 

  • Cornering adds quite a lean to the video - is this minimised with a handle or selfie-stick? 
  • And if the camera is on a stick, how do you keep it pointing forward (or backward) and level? 
  • There's that up down thing too... What's the best way to keep the camera vertical, especially while accelerating and braking? 
  • Also, what about wind noise? 

Then, after the riding is done; 

  • What post-production software do you use?
  • And what features make that your tool of choice?

 

Any and all comments and thoughts from our "professionals" would be appreciated, and if anyone else has questions, please post too...

Edited by The Fat Unicyclist
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

Okay so here's the thing... I have finally got myself a video camera - to be fair though, they are only just new on the market here in New Zealand, so it's a pioneering effort!  ;)

Anyway I hate learning things the hard way, so now that I'm starting to play with it I'm hoping that some of you experienced videographers (or your film crews) would be happy to answer some questions and share some secrets? And this includes you @Marty Backe and @who_the, after all it's your epic productions that are lifting the bar so high! 

Now I scored the Sony FDR X3000, which has optical stabilisation built-in. So even hand-held video looks really good... Mostly... 

  • Cornering adds quite a lean to the video - is this minimised with a handle or selfie-stick? 
  • And if the camera is on a stick, how do you keep it pointing forward (or backward) and level? 
  • There's that up down thing too... What's the best way to keep the camera vertical, especially while accelerating and braking? 
  • Also, what about wind noise? 

Then, after the riding is done; 

  • What post-production software do you use?
  • And what features make that your tool of choice?

 

Any and all comments and thoughts from our "professionals" would be appreciated, and if anyone else has questions, please post too...

If you look at one of my most recent YouTube videos, in the description, you will see all of the equipment that I use, including filming and editing.

To answer your bulleted questions, for me it's just a matter of learning (practicing) how to hold a tripod in a steady position. Sometimes I like to lean the camera with my turns to give a more dramatic effect. It's all kind of natural for me, so I'm afraid I don't really have any tips to offer other than practice.

I think any good (not free) software will work. I started using mine many years ago so I've just stuck with it. I can't say it's necessarily better than other similar software.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not professional and my videos ain't so good as I lack the skill ( I never have a storyboard and most of the time I just merge and add some background music)

software I use video pad from nch. It does the job and has plenty of tools and features. Trial is free but if you're thinking professional Adobe has great tools that you can try to master. If you're looking for free, YouTube has a video editor too, though it is a PIA sometimes. When you're ready you can download back the mp4 and rendering is fine on their server so you don't need to bother with your computer waiting, just visit YouTube later and you find it ready

Edited by IPS Malta
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wind noise comes from the mic holes. Cover them with a small piece of fur fabric. This is how look a professional mic windshield:

0q3pu.jpg

I use Adobe premiere and Shortcut for video editing but they are many other  http://www.techradar.com/news/software/applications/the-best-free-video-editor-1330136

The stick is insufficient for preventing camera tilt and lean. You need a gimbal 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQGyDlXRHJ4uYcAsXy9XCL

Hope you get fun making videos, be patient and don't bother if they aren't perfect.  Add music, sync up the cuts, and enjoy

Edited by Demargon
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Demargon said:

The wind noise comes from the mic holes. Cover them with a small piece of fur fabric. This is how look a professional mic windshield:

 

I use Adobe premiere and Shortcut for video editing but they are many other  http://www.techradar.com/news/software/applications/the-best-free-video-editor-1330136

The stick is insufficient for preventing camera tilt and lean. You need a gimbal 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQGyDlXRHJ4uYcAsXy9XCL

Hope you get fun making videos, be patient and don't bother if they aren't perfect.  Add music, sync up the cuts, and enjoy

I've never used a gimbal, so I don't think that they are necessary for decent videos.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed to that @Marty Backe but gimbal is the correct answer for the best way to keep the camera leveled.

Maybe you can teach yours selfie stick tricks. I really appreciate it

Edited by Demargon
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

l am fortunate that my job gives me full Adobe CC access, including Premiere Pro and After Effects.

And I'm now playing with the Sony FDR X3000 - so I don't really need a gimbal, but a single-axis one might be handy to keep the camera level...

 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i can highly reccomend a gimbal or steadycam 

though a gimbal is usually much lighter and extremely stable and very easy to set up

whats the point of high quality video if its shaky..

 

having a gimbal will make your videos look much more proffesional almost instantly

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Shad0z said:

whats the point of high quality video if its shaky.

That's a good point, but @Marty Backe and others have shown that a "stick" which is essentially what a monopod is, works well, if handled carefully.  Of course, Marty has the X3000 with good image stabilization so that helps, but he always manages to frame his shots well, sight unseen.  This thread has me thinking I might give it a go too, The Marty/Chooch way.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Smoother said:

That's a good point, but @Marty Backe and others have shown that a "stick" which is essentially what a monopod is, works well, if handled carefully.  Of course, Marty has the X3000 with good image stabilization so that helps, but he always manages to frame his shots well, sight unseen.  This thread has me thinking I might give it a go too, The Marty/Chooch way.

I use a very long selfie-stick (a tripod actually) which allows me to get good framing shots without seeing the tripod.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×