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EUC is officially legal in Denmark from Jan 1st 2018


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1 hour ago, meepmeepmayer said:

Oh coo...

... nevermind:furious::furious::furious:

Assholes. No other way to put it. What reasonable train of thought (with no ill intentions) could possibly end in this crap?

This is why I hate regulations. They are created by a team of bureaucrats backed by lawyers so you end up with something like this. Thank God that the car was invented before the modern day mentality of government or we would have cars that could only go 55km/h.

I continue to pray that regulators in the United States never turn their eye towards the EUC.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Congratulations, I am glad to hear the law allows EUC be used there. Though the limit may be low, at least it is persmisible and legal. After all, is the police going to stand on the street with a scan gun to make sure you are going under 20km/h. I think the purpose is to give the police and court a leverage to rule in favor of pedestrians in case of an accident whether or not it's speed related. Here in San Francisco, our regulations are still very cloudy and vary from area to area. Like some say, the bureaucrats don't really know what happens on ground level. In my opinion, bicyclists riding fast are much more dangerous and deadly than EUC riders.

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I have to chime in here because I'm sort of annoyed at the pass bicycles get as far as speed limits in the bike lane. For example, here in Oregon we can only go 15 mph on street or bike lane. Bikes can go pretty much as fast their feet can take them in the bike lane. They aren't supposed to be on the crosswalks and such but that's not enforced. I know from my experiences with Jonny Law they watch me like a hawk. Better more lobbyists for bicycle folks I guess. 20 km/h is ridiculous, but I guess that's only 4 to 5 less than the rules here. 

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I've bookmarked the "Segway" laws so I can show people just what the laws are concerning where I can go.

Last week I had an in-line skater screaming at me, "no motorized vehicles" on the bike trail the specifically allows Segway (so long as they keep below 22 mph which to me seems insanely fast).

I expect to get that a lot more. Rather than argue with people, I find it just easier to ask them to read the bookmarked law, and then ask them for their interpretation of it.

Interestingly, almost all people will interpret that law to not include any motorized vehicles even though the law specifically names Segways. This means, except for you own amusement, convincing people contrary to what they want to believe is extremely difficult.

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1 minute ago, LanghamP said:

I've bookmarked the "Segway" laws so I can show people just what the laws are concerning where I can go.

Last week I had an in-line skater screaming at me, "no motorized vehicles" on the bike trail the specifically allows Segway (so long as they keep below 22 mph which to me seems insanely fast).

I expect to get that a lot more. Rather than argue with people, I find it just easier to ask them to read the bookmarked law, and then ask them for their interpretation of it.

Interestingly, almost all people will interpret that law to not include any motorized vehicles even though the law specifically names Segways. This means, except for you own amusement, convincing people contrary to what they want to believe is extremely difficult.

Good stuff. I've taken to carrying the laws pertaining to Segways in my pocket now. I also carry the legal definition of a scooter in Oregon so that they can't call me a scooter either. Scooters are far more restrictive here.

 

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I usually take my chances. In most cases, no authorities bother me. One time, I was riding on the sidewalk on Irving street and passed by in front of 4 police cops. They didn't say a word to me. I think to a certain extent, some cops judge you to see if you look like a threat to public--how you are riding, how fast you are going, are you high on something. Really, aren't there more serious things for cops to tend rather than looking at us mature unicycle riders...? I seldom see 16 years old/young people riding these toys.

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2 hours ago, who_the said:

Actually, compared with other places, we're fortunate here in California to have EUC's officially classified and regulated. California law defines us as "electrically motorized boards" and designates us as though we are bicycles. (§ 21294 limits our speed to 15 mph and also includes "basic speed law" language, saying we can't operate faster than safety would permit. Also requires us to use lights and forbids us from drinking or using drugs while riding.)

San Francisco law (§ 7.2.11) bans EUCs (and all "electric personal mobility devices," like Segways) and also bicycles (§ 7.2.12) from sidewalks, but we are legal on shared pathways like the Embarcadero, Crissy Field, and nearly all of our bicycle path infrastructure.

You are correct that individual cities, counties, and park districts can impose their own restrictions that override state law, and some actually enforce them. 

The Golden Gate Bridge (under control of the Golden Gate Transportation District, which can set its own rules) prohibits EUCs on either the west bikeway or the east pedestrian path, though enforcement can vary. Our group once was "met" on the north end of the bridge by a trooper car with spinning lights, and we received a very stiff warning. Others in our group have ridden across (and taken selfies with Highway Patrol officers) without reprimand, so a lot depends on luck and timing.

 

20171024_163739(0).jpg

Sorry. I need to go back and actually read what you said.:facepalm:

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2 hours ago, LanghamP said:

I've bookmarked the "Segway" laws so I can show people just what the laws are concerning where I can go.

Last week I had an in-line skater screaming at me, "no motorized vehicles" on the bike trail the specifically allows Segway (so long as they keep below 22 mph which to me seems insanely fast).

I expect to get that a lot more. Rather than argue with people, I find it just easier to ask them to read the bookmarked law, and then ask them for their interpretation of it.

Interestingly, almost all people will interpret that law to not include any motorized vehicles even though the law specifically names Segways. This means, except for you own amusement, convincing people contrary to what they want to believe is extremely difficult.

Do you have a link?  Just yesterday I was riding at the park, and was about to ride across the street (on the crosswalk), When I noticed a police car sitting way back in the parking lot where the people who use the dog park park.  I decided to pick up the S1 and carry it across.  Then set it down and rode away, the police car did not follow me or flash lights or sound siren.  Probably not after me, but it would be nice to have the Segway rules in my wallet.

I don't take crosswalks for granted, I always look both ways twice, but it would be nice to have some kind of paper.

I keep meeting people with dogs, dog's freak out when seeing a person gliding, so I slow wayy down.

Edited by steve454
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10 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

That's Jesse's wife. I envy the guys that can go riding with their wife.

I guess I’ll go back a read now. No envy for me but being I attempted to teach my wife. Can I atleast get an ‘Attaboy’ ?

Edited by Rehab1
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19 hours ago, steve454 said:

Do you have a link? 

The Texas state rules seem to be here, although i don't know if these are the most up to date, search for section 551.202:

http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/docs/TN/htm/TN.551.htm

Like a lot of old laws created for Segway they have those crazy things like "two non-tandem wheels" and "average power of 750 watts or one horsepower". The first term technically means that no EUC qualifies unless you glue another wheel to the case somewhere. The second limit isn't likely to be a problem unless a policeman on a mounted horse stops you and challenges you to a tug-of-war. Even then, you'd have to win so just throw the match for everyone's sake.

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1 hour ago, dmethvin said:

The Texas state rules seem to be here, although i don't know if these are the most up to date, search for section 551.202:

http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/docs/TN/htm/TN.551.htm

Like a lot of old laws created for Segway they have those crazy things like "two non-tandem wheels" and "average power of 750 watts or one horsepower". The first term technically means that no EUC qualifies unless you glue another wheel to the case somewhere. The second limit isn't likely to be a problem unless a policeman on a mounted horse stops you and challenges you to a tug-of-war. Even then, you'd have to win so just throw the match for everyone's sake.

Thanks very much @dmethvin  I printed out that section to keep with me!

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7 minutes ago, outcast00096 said:

Sorry, I forgot about this but Segway keeps up on the rulings and gives links to applicable laws here. http://www.segway.com/support/regulatory-information

Pretty cool, click on your state's link and it goes to the statute for electric personal mobility devices.  Interesting that five states have no prohibitions, but could have local regulations.

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No matter what your state says, there can be other restrictions. For example, I believe that even though New York State allows them, New York City has more limits (although from what people describe here they don't enforce them consistently).  I went to the Baltimore and Annapolis Trail once here in Maryland and they threw me out because they don't permit any battery-powered devices or pedal-powered covered bikes. In the Washington DC area we have, I kid you not, about 20 different law enforcement groups that have different rules about whether you can use a bike/ebike/Segway/EUC in their area. Most have no idea what an EUC is anyway so they don't tend to stop you if you keep a low profile.

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In my opinion this is a welcomed development and a very important first step forward. It marks the initial acceptance  by Denmark authorities of eucs into the city enviroment as a personal electric transportation and despite being more restrictive than most of us would wish it is better than most other countries have . The laws will addapt accordingly depending on safety records and technology developments . It is up to the eucs to show how well they will integrate in the transport sistem of the cities and if the restriction should be relaxed. It would be unrealistic to expect the law makers to allow a higher speed limit initialy .

Meanwhile in UK we had the second case of euc rider persecution for driving a motorized veicle without insurance with penalty of six points on driving license. :( .

Congratulations for Denmark euc riders :thumbup: . I am happy for you and i hope other countries in Europe will follow .

Happy new year to all in this amazing forum . ?

 

Edited by Luiz
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14 hours ago, outcast00096 said:

Sorry, I forgot about this but Segway keeps up on the rulings and gives links to applicable laws here. http://www.segway.com/support/regulatory-information

This is an excellent site!  Segway has definately done their homework. If ever stopped you can easily whip out your phone and reference this comprehensive site for your specific state regulations when discussing the possible impending violation. 

Cities and townships most likely have their own set of rules and regulations but atleast you’ll have a plausible legal explanation at the moment that may provide you with a ‘get out of jail free card’. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/28/2017 at 4:37 PM, who_the said:

The Golden Gate Bridge (under control of the Golden Gate Transportation District, which can set its own rules) prohibits EUCs on either the west bikeway or the east pedestrian path, though enforcement can vary. Our group once was "met" on the north end of the bridge by a trooper car with spinning lights, and we received a very stiff warning. Others in our group have ridden across (and taken selfies with Highway Patrol officers) without reprimand, so a lot depends on luck and timing.

Jan 5, 2018 post

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