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Gotway Mten3 Tube Replacement

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18 hours ago, radial said:

As reported in another thread, I managed to flatten the tire on my Mten3 after slamming into a hidden pothole.  I'm still waiting for the new tube to arrive, but thought I would share a little about my experience with this repair so far.  

The Mten3 teardown video was useful in getting the wheel disassembled.  There is nothing very complicated involved.  You can do the whole thing with a small / medium Phillips screwdriver for the various screws holding the shells together and a 5mm hex key for the pedal nuts.  I kind of wish I had taken a picture of the wire routing before I took it all apart, but hopefully I can get everything back where it belongs.  

Getting the tire off the rim proved more of a challenge.  My first attempt involved a set of plastic tire levers like you would use to change a bicycle tire.  They were definitely not beefy enough to do the job.  After watching a couple of Youtube videos on changing motorcycle tires, I realized that I would need a better tool.  These tire levers are the ones I ordered off Amazon:

61tUs7MpLlL._SL1222_.jpg

Another thing that was important was lubrication.  My attempt with the bicycle levers was made without lube.  This time I spritzed down the tire and rim with Windex which was recommended in one of the videos I watched.  Other users here had also suggested warming up the tire to make it more flexible.  I was prepared to do that with a hair dryer, but it wasn't necessary.  Between the new levers and the lube, I had the tire popped off the rim in about two minutes.  

Once I could see the tube, a couple of things stood out.  First, it wasn't a puncture.  The tube was ripped all around the valve stem as if the stem had snagged on something.  No chance of Slime sealing that kind of tear. 

Just speculating here, but I was using a pressure-monitoring valve cap that was heavier and slightly longer than the stock plastic one.  Could be that the force of the concussion with the pothole was enough to cause the valve stem to swing out and catch on something.  Can't be sure, but I'll be using a regular cap on the new tube.  There's not enough clearance inside the Mten3 wheel housing for anything too fancy.  The other interesting thing was that the stock tube is clearly marked as  10 x 2.5", not 3".

IMG_4664.thumb.jpg.592b54694c6334402857bb6eaeeb660a.jpg

So, the 10 x 2.5" tube I ordered should work fine provided the valve is oriented properly.  I'll come back and finish up this post once the new tube arrives.

Good info. Look forward to hearing how the tube replacement goes.

I thought someone (can't remember exactly who right this second) reported that their tube said it was a 2 inch tire?

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17 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

Good info. Look forward to hearing how the tube replacement goes.

I thought someone (can't remember exactly who right this second) reported that their tube said it was a 2 inch tire?

Yes, and I think there was a picture to prove it.  Apparently Gotway isn't standardized on tube size.  I think it's interesting that they are now switching to tubeless.  Maybe putting tubes in the Mten3 tire wasn't such a good idea.  I'm aware of at least two other users here who have popped the tubes on their Mten3 tires.  If I could find the right kind of valve, I would be tempted to convert to tubeless right now.

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Personally I prefer an inner tube so I can add a puncture resist tape on the inside wall of the tire between the tire and the inner tube.  Of course that would not have helped your "explosion" damage on the stem.  Great idea on the pressure monitor cap, I will add one also.  What pressure do you run?

Edited by GQS

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10 minutes ago, radial said:

Yes, and I think there was a picture to prove it.  Apparently Gotway isn't standardized on tube size.  I think it's interesting that they are now switching to tubeless.  Maybe putting tubes in the Mten3 tire wasn't such a good idea.  I'm aware of at least two other users here who have popped the tubes on their Mten3 tires.  If I could find the right kind of valve, I would be tempted to convert to tubeless right now.

I haven't see a bent valve for tubeless tires so it'll be interesting to see the Gotway implementation.

I'm holding my breath that I don't get a blown tube :cry2:

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1 hour ago, Marty Backe said:

The other interesting thing was that the stock tube is clearly marked as  10 x 2.5", not 3".

YES , My stock tube was marked 10 x2" looks like we have different tubes..  so far my patch has held up nicely.

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1 hour ago, Arklag said:

Ive successfully converted my mten3 to a tubeless with relative ease. It probably took me about an hour all said and done. I measured the hole and it was about 10mm, so i ended up buying some 10.5mm rubber valve stems from taobao. I bought the 7th item on the list that says "小头(电平车)"  https://item.taobao.com/item.htm?spm=2013.1.20141002.4.7dab14ff3ZBAp6&scm=1007.10009.70205.100200300000001&id=526509074402&pvid=48ce2593-ce69-42e9-9318-59c14b998a33

Installing that stem was kind of a bitch. I lathered it up in soap, and tried pulling that thing through using needle nose pliers right near the base and leveraging it through. I thought i was going to break it I was pulling so hard. After futzing with it for 10 minutes and not being able to get it through, i decided to pull it as hard as i could. It worked! It just popped right in. Anyways, i think you get the 11.5mm ones, they might work too. Just pull harder? 

https://www.amazon.com/Slime-2080-Rubber-Valve-Stems/dp/B0041FCNU0

Don't bother with the valve stems with the nuts. You wont be able to tighten the nuts since the valve comes out at an angle and interferes with the rim. 

Also, ive popped three Mten3 inner tubes in 150km. I was fed up with that bullshit. 

3 tubes? What are doing to that poor wheel ;)  I'm seriously interested in knowing the conditions that cause the the tube to burst (I assume we aren't talking about punctures).

I'm curious, did you have any problems getting the tire to seal as you filled it with air? Would you agree that this probably wouldn't be possible with a hand pump?

 

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13 minutes ago, Jason McNeil said:

Linnea just sent over this video of a factory worker installing the tubeless valve—I don't think long fingernails are needed to fit it...

Valve extenders are going to be necessary.

 

 

 

Great video - thanks for posting it here Jason.

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4 minutes ago, WARPed1701D said:

Did they put something like Slime in it near the end? 

All tubeless installations I've read recommend adding sealant.

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2 minutes ago, WARPed1701D said:

Did they put something like Slime in it near the end? 

Looks like some kind of slime.  I know tubeless slime is different and has bigger chunks of stuff in it to clog up puncture.  It didn't appear to be what was put in on this wheel.

I need to get one of those stem tools with the ring for leverage.  Looks like it would make things a lot easier.  So will a regular electric compressor not work for the initial seal? Thanks for passing along this video @Jason McNeil.  Very useful!

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4 hours ago, Sketch said:
  4 hours ago, WARPed1701D said:

Did they put something like Slime in it near the end

 

4 hours ago, Sketch said:

Looks like some kind of slime.  I know tubeless slime is different and has bigger chunks of stuff in it to clog up puncture.  It didn't appear to be what was put in on this wheel.

I need to get one of those stem tools with the ring for leverage.  Looks like it would make things a lot easier.  So will a regular electric compressor not work for the initial seal? Thanks for passing along this video @Jason McNeil.  Very useful!

If the electric compressor has a tank to store air under pressure it would.  In the video they had to have been using one to get those quick pulses of air.  Harbor Freight sells one for about $57.00 that would probably work fine for such a small tire.  https://www.harborfreight.com/3-gal-13-hp-100-psi-oilless-pancake-air-compressor-61615.html

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Here an Ebay link to a 10"x3" innertube.  The 10x3 looks fatter than the 10.2.5 by a bit.  It also has the bent metal valve stem. 

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Is the valve facing the right way in that eBay inner tube?  It looks like it's going out and not bent along the direction of the wheel or do they twist a bit to face the direction you want?

Edited by Hunka Hunka Burning Love
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I bet the cap you put on snagged on the inside of the wheel body on the way around and the motor literally ripped the valve stem out of the inter-tube as it turned the wheel. 

I think it unlikely that it caught on something on the ground as it passed the open part of the wheel circumference.  

Either way, it is likely a good idea that whatever tube you replace it with has a very short valve stem.

Edited by stevedig
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21 minutes ago, GQS said:

Here an Ebay link to a 10"x3" innertube.  The 10x3 looks fatter than the 10.2.5 by a bit.  It also has the bent metal valve stem. 

It's hard to be sure, but the valve looks like it's pointing in the wrong direction to work. The valve needs to bend parallel to spin of the tire. This one looks perpendicular. 

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1 hour ago, stevedig said:

I bet the cap you put on snagged on the inside of the wheel body on the way around and the motor literally ripped the valve stem out of the inter-tube as it turned the wheel. 

I think it unlikely that it caught on something on the ground as it passed the open part of the wheel circumference.  

Either way, it is likely a good idea that whatever tube you replace it with has a very short valve stem.

I think you are right, large valve caps are going to snag on something.  Probably best to leave the valve cap off completely.  The clearance is not there.  I never put a valve cap on, it's almost impossible to do anyway, and you have to air up the tire about every week or so anyway, so why bother?  And have never had a problem with dirt clogging the valve core.

I really like the pressure monitoring caps for cars, though.  You can see at a glance if one tire is low.

On my EUC, I can feel when the tire is low, and just put more air in it.

One option is to let all the air out, then have it refilled with Nitrogen.  The molecules are different (larger?) and it is said that the pressure doesn't drop.  (at least on car tires)

Refilling with Nitrogen is expensive, however, and looks like a scam!

https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/nitrogen-vs-air

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4 hours ago, stevedig said:

I bet the cap you put on snagged on the inside of the wheel body on the way around and the motor literally ripped the valve stem out of the inter-tube as it turned the wheel. 

I think it unlikely that it caught on something on the ground as it passed the open part of the wheel circumference.  

Either way, it is likely a good idea that whatever tube you replace it with has a very short valve stem.

 

That's my bet too.  I'm not going to use the pressure monitoring cap on the new tube.  It seemed like a good idea at the time, but...

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how the hell did the phone spell checker come up with "inter-tube"?     huh, i hate typing on those things.

----

it's the only scenario i can think of that makes sense. the weight of the pressure cap combined with the rpm of the wheel pushed it down the slope on the inside edge of the rim and out into contact with the inside of the body. it caught something or bound up and 2 inches later... serious flat.

lighter and shorter and stiffer = better.

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1 minute ago, stevedig said:

it's the only scenario i can think of that makes sense. the weight of the pressure cap combined with the rpm of the wheel pushed it down the slope on the inside edge of the rim and out into contact with the inside of the body. it caught something or bound up and 2 inches later... serious flat.

lighter and shorter and stiffer = better.

1

Plus the sudden impact with the pothole probably caused the top-heavy valve stem to swing out where it was in a position to collide with something.  I notice that the tubeless valve stem in Jason's video is 1) very short, and 2) not angled at all.  That seems like a much more reliable configuration, even if it might require screwing on an extension to add air.  I do that anyway with my other wheels, so no big deal.  

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On 11/1/2017 at 11:22 PM, Marty Backe said:

3 tubes? What are doing to that poor wheel ;)  I'm seriously interested in knowing the conditions that cause the the tube to burst (I assume we aren't talking about punctures).

I'm curious, did you have any problems getting the tire to seal as you filled it with air? Would you agree that this probably wouldn't be possible with a hand pump?

Yeah... im a little aggressive (dropping down curbs and tight turns) and like to keep the tire as deflated as possible without risking a pinch flat. Sometimes i get that wrong, but i think the main problem with getting so many flats was that the inner tubes had to be twisted a little to get in since the valve location is off center. Anyways since i made the upgrade to tubeless i havent gotten a flat yet! 

I tried with a handpump at first and failed so i brought out the compressed air tank. I read somewhere on the internet that you can use a ratchet strap down the center of the tire to flare out the sides to get it to hold. I didnt try it, so YMMV. 

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1 hour ago, Arklag said:

Yeah... im a little aggressive (dropping down curbs and tight turns) and like to keep the tire as deflated as possible without risking a pinch flat. Sometimes i get that wrong, but i think the main problem with getting so many flats was that the inner tubes had to be twisted a little to get in since the valve location is off center. Anyways since i made the upgrade to tubeless i havent gotten a flat yet! 

I tried with a handpump at first and failed so i brought out the compressed air tank. I read somewhere on the internet that you can use a ratchet strap down the center of the tire to flare out the sides to get it to hold. I didnt try it, so YMMV. 

Interesting, and thanks for the tip about using a ratchet strap.

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On 11/1/2017 at 5:52 PM, GQS said:

Here an Ebay link to a 10"x3" innertube.  The 10x3 looks fatter than the 10.2.5 by a bit.  It also has the bent metal valve stem. 

I don’t think this will fit, to me the inner circumference looks too small for the mten3

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