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First Wheel, First Ride


gonnabiff
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@gonnabiff

Congrats for your first meters, welcome to the forum and the Euc world :-)

From now on, it gets better every day with riding! Your conclusion 4: Verry correct! Look at the horizont.

Your wobbles will go away! As long as you throw the wheel around: Pad it up nicely :-)

With the wheel you choose...you are good to go the next months!

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An enjoyable read:efee47c9c8:

1 hour ago, gonnabiff said:

2. Wonder if ski poles or simple broomsticks could supply a bit of helpful balance in the beginning, brief gentle prods back to stable, particularly if there is no fence or railing available.

No, that will probably be counterproductive. Just go, on concrete/pavement (easier than grass), and in doubt just go straight and FAST (going faster stabilizes you).

Other than that, once you've managed to ride without holding on to something, just start and start again until you can do it. See this vid. Or just start from a pole and go on from there.

 

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Just get in seat time, or in our cases stand time, and as much as you can, and forget about doing anything other than mounting and going forward. Nothing fancy, don't treat it like a skateboard like the way I foolishly did, just get in time, maybe an hour per day.

I would classify wheels as pretty darned dangerous because they are powered, and can knock you hard when they do something unexpected. Easily worse than motorcycles.

Wear a helmet if nothing else.

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It was just a month ago that I started myself so the memories are still fresh.  My excitement level was able to carry me through the learning phase fairly smoothly.  

The biggest key is finding the right environment.  If I was doing it again, I would have immediately started in the place I ended up finding after mucking around directly outside my apartment building.  The best is if you can find a "fenced corridor" that is hallway width.  It allows you to essentially pin ball between the fences for support. 

There's nothing like that first experience of gliding for a significant distance when you weren't expecting it.  It's interesting how confident I was that I would really enjoy riding before actually trying it.  I'll be approached by people curious about the wheel and can sense them trying to dip their toes in, but not being seriously interested, and it's fascinating because of how quickly I knew it was something I would love. 

Was thinking earlier that I envision myself riding a wheel for the rest of my life.  It's an odd thought, but reflects how integrated I feel with the technology so quickly. 

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There was a 65 year old guy on youtube who documented his learning on a Ninebot One. He moved "old" and you would think this EUC learning is a really bad idea, but he persevered until eventually he could ride. It took 20 years off his apparent age, he moved old but by the end he had a speed and agility that wasn't there before.

It was very noticeable if you watched the first video vs the last video. He crashed into bicyclists and broke his arm, and that was that.

Anyway, not to end on a depressing note, I think any of these agility sports like EUC, yoga, slackline, etc... are probably the best thing you can do for yourself as you age, although I wonder if EUC and rollerblading are that good for you as one feels a broken wrist/arm is merely a matter of time.

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Do what you love, but will it love you back?

Skiing, road cycling, etc. I'm very careful on my bike and then recently had a crash on group ride that messed up cognition and skin and joints for almost a year. And I don't even know what happened because of 3-5 seconds of retrograde amnesia!

Agree that balance practice and improvement are vital for managing risk of falls in the final years! But for pure medical prophylaxis possibly can do that just as well on a supervised static balance board, once at the age where fun has become terrifying.

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12 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

I also can't imagine a future period in my life (other than my death bed) where I'm not riding a wheel. Even after I complete a 4+ hour ride and pretty much don't want to look at it the rest of the day, come tomorrow I look forward to my next ride.

Other people have said this also; I've discovered so much about the area that I live that would have remained oblivious to me if not for the wheel.

And I've met so many people, virtually (here) and in real-life. I hope everyone is able to find local riders where they can enjoy group rides. Lots of great camaraderie, even if you have to put up with riders like @Jrkline "Wheel Whisperer" who like to mess with your videos by grabbing their crotches when in the shot :)

 

It's unusual to feel so attached to a piece of technology that is still so uncommon to see out in the world.  I'm really dreading the colder weather because until now about 50% of my riding has been for pleasure, but now it's going to be reduced to necessity.  I figure there will be a few mild spells that will offer brief windows to ride for fun, but few and far between. 

 

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32 minutes ago, mezzanine said:

It's unusual to feel so attached to a piece of technology that is still so uncommon to see out in the world.  I'm really dreading the colder weather because until now about 50% of my riding has been for pleasure, but now it's going to be reduced to necessity.  I figure there will be a few mild spells that will offer brief windows to ride for fun, but few and far between. 

 

I really feel for you guys that suffer living through cold winters. I treasure my ability to ride in comfort nearly every day of the year.

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12 minutes ago, gonnabiff said:

Freezing here! 63F this AM. Thank goodness cold snap is ending. 

I know! Right!

My fingers were cold yesterday riding into work. It was 59F in St. Pete! Warmer this morning though. I might have to consider wearing a jacket and gloves if it keeps it up! :D

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25 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

I really feel for you guys that suffer living through cold winters. I treasure my ability to ride in comfort nearly every day of the year.

That makes me want to roofie your drink in a gay bar, thanks for reminding us about our winters.<_<

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<_<  15 to 17°C is like a nice summer day here although it does go up to about 24 to 26°C sometimes.  Cold is -32°C (-25°F) with wind chill.  Ever try that experiment where you take a cup of boiling water and throw it into the air, and it evaporates instantly?  Yep, it works when it's that cold.

 

Edited by Hunka Hunka Burning Love
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  • 3 weeks later...

After I got kicked off the town's expensive new artificial turf athletic fields, my second ride started on the fence around a roller hockey rink but I got tired of messing with the fence so just pushed off into the middle, and then onto the basketball courts where I was doing laps and figure eights. After an hour or so I took a sidewalk tour of the park. Turns were a bit dicey, especially sharp turns on narrow sidewalk, but I stayed on it for a full lap of about a mile. On this ride I mastered free mounts, level or downhill at least.

Third and fourth rides were from my house up and down my local streets. After a long straight-away my turns are a bit shaky. Even on a straight run I can develop a shimmie or wobbles that are the equivalent of rock climbing sewing-machine-leg; feels like a resonant condition that will lead to a crash but by intentionally relaxing I can dampen the wobble. I think this will yield to more experience with muscle memory and proprioception and probably even isometric strengthening of lower leg muscles. I did return to the basketball courts for figure eights. Easy turns will come with practice I'm sure.

My biggest problem will certainly improve but is a bit frustrating--I have trouble accelerating when I first get on the wheel. I think I'm leaning forward, but nothing happens. Once I am underway, I can accelerate and decelerate without any problem. Although I do often dismount by stepping off the back of the wheel and letting it crash to a stop; hope to get more control slowing to a step-off and then grabbing the wheel. The KS-16S is really tough. After I scrub the dirt and grass off it it still looks pretty good.

As Jason and experienced riders have said, lower leg ankle/shin pressure pain disappears completely once you have started to ride your particular wheel. Your feet simply position themselves in a place that is comfortable. Happens automatically. I think there is a several-page post going on about trying to learn where to place feet prior to riding, but I'm not sure that is possible. Unfortunately given the different anatomy and pad configuration of each rider and wheel, Just Do It is probably the best advice, and once you are underway on your wheel, your feet find their place on their own and the pain is gone thereafter. But it sure did hurt like bone bruises in the beginning.

I'm still wearing full tropical mesh Cordura motorcycle pants and jacket with built-in hard pads, and gloves and wrist guards, and bike helmet and lace-up shoes. Might look goofy but I'll be grateful for the coverage when I take a spill.

 

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27 minutes ago, gonnabiff said:

After I got kicked off the town's expensive new artificial turf athletic fields, my second ride started on the fence around a roller hockey rink but I got tired of messing with the fence so just pushed off into the middle, and then onto the basketball courts where I was doing laps and figure eights. After an hour or so I took a sidewalk tour of the park. Turns were a bit dicey, especially sharp turns on narrow sidewalk, but I stayed on it for a full lap of about a mile. On this ride I mastered free mounts, level or downhill at least.

Third and fourth rides were from my house up and down my local streets. After a long straight-away my turns are a bit shaky. Even on a straight run I can develop a shimmie or wobbles that are the equivalent of rock climbing sewing-machine-leg; feels like a resonant condition that will lead to a crash but by intentionally relaxing I can dampen the wobble. I think this will yield to more experience with muscle memory and proprioception and probably even isometric strengthening of lower leg muscles. I did return to the basketball courts for figure eights. Easy turns will come with practice I'm sure.

My biggest problem will certainly improve but is a bit frustrating--I have trouble accelerating when I first get on the wheel. I think I'm leaning forward, but nothing happens. Once I am underway, I can accelerate and decelerate without any problem. Although I do often dismount by stepping off the back of the wheel and letting it crash to a stop; hope to get more control slowing to a step-off and then grabbing the wheel. The KS-16S is really tough. After I scrub the dirt and grass off it it still looks pretty good.

As Jason and experienced riders have said, lower leg ankle/shin pressure pain disappears completely once you have started to ride your particular wheel. Your feet simply position themselves in a place that is comfortable. Happens automatically. I think there is a several-page post going on about trying to learn where to place feet prior to riding, but I'm not sure that is possible. Unfortunately given the different anatomy and pad configuration of each rider and wheel, Just Do It is probably the best advice, and once you are underway on your wheel, your feet find their place on their own and the pain is gone thereafter. But it sure did hurt like bone bruises in the beginning.

I'm still wearing full tropical mesh Cordura motorcycle pants and jacket with built-in hard pads, and gloves and wrist guards, and bike helmet and lace-up shoes. Might look goofy but I'll be grateful for the coverage when I take a spill.

 

I wonder if perhaps your feet are too far back on the pedal? Only if you are really accelerating hard should you be "leaning into it".  The wheel should start moving forward with very little effort on your part.

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21 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

I wonder if perhaps your feet are too far back on the pedal? Only if you are really accelerating hard should you be "leaning into it".  The wheel should start moving forward with very little effort on your part.

The instinct of most people is to slow down when in danger; the act of going slow makes the wheel feel dangerous as it becomes unstable. 

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Thanks, Marty. I've tried different foot positions and don't really like my toes cantilevered too far off the front, feels insecure. I think they are close to centered fore and aft over the pedal.

I do not video myself so I don't have objective body position, just what I feel. When I am underway, speed control is very intuitive and essentially seems like mind control. Even very slow speed turns--which I practice around lines on the basketball court--have good speed control.

Only my initial acceleration after mounting doesn't always work. Since mounting is a complex series of events which in practice flows rapidly and smoothly, I know the final phase will come with experience.

Before I began riding I anticipated that speed control would be managed by relative pressure on forefoot vs. heel, but I don't perceive that at all in practice. Likewise I'm not sure when calibration might be needed or why an asymmetric pedal slant might be desirable. At this point, it seems I adjust to the wheel and it works fine. But with experience I may wish to adjust the null position.

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15 minutes ago, gonnabiff said:

Thanks, Marty. I've tried different foot positions and don't really like my toes cantilevered too far off the front, feels insecure. I think they are close to centered fore and aft over the pedal.

I do not video myself so I don't have objective body position, just what I feel. When I am underway, speed control is very intuitive and essentially seems like mind control. Even very slow speed turns--which I practice around lines on the basketball court--have good speed control.

Only my initial acceleration after mounting doesn't always work. Since mounting is a complex series of events which in practice flows rapidly and smoothly, I know the final phase will come with experience.

Before I began riding I anticipated that speed control would be managed by relative pressure on forefoot vs. heel, but I don't perceive that at all in practice. Likewise I'm not sure when calibration might be needed or why an asymmetric pedal slant might be desirable. At this point, it seems I adjust to the wheel and it works fine. But with experience I may wish to adjust the null position.

Yes, I think it will come with time. Patience.

As you've noted, heel / forefoot pressure is not involved in speed control.

I prefer that my pedals are approximately level with the ground - I don't get a level out, I just eye-ball it. Sometimes when I know that I'll be doing a lot of hill climbing I will recalibrate with a slight backward pedal tilt to make life a little easier.

Likewise, you can calibrate the pedals for a slight (1 - 3 degrees) backward tilt which will make the wheel naturally want to drive forward with little effort on your part.

Calibration is fast and reliable. Everyone should experiment with calibrating their wheels. You won't break anything. What wheel are you riding?

Edited by Marty Backe
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11 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

What wheel are you riding?

KS16S. Appreciate your comments, Marty.

I twist my reasoning into knots trying to understand the dynamics, for instance what comes first--lean forward or acceleration? And if pedal tilt is not about fore-aft foot pressure, what is it? But happily no understanding is required for successful iteration and trial and error in learning and improving.

I didn't teach my kids theory before they got on bikes; I ran alongside and then they were riding.

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3 minutes ago, gonnabiff said:

KS16S. Appreciate your comments, Marty.

I twist my reasoning into knots trying to understand the dynamics, for instance what comes first--lean forward or acceleration? And if pedal tilt is not about fore-aft foot pressure, what is it? But happily no understanding is required for successful iteration and trial and error in learning and improving.

I didn't teach my kids theory before they got on bikes; I ran alongside and then they were riding.

Exactly. It's all about forming the muscle memory. It'll work itself out.

Calibration on the KingSong is easy. Definitely experiment and maybe try a couple of degree backward tilt to help you along.

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