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1 hour ago, ir_fuel said:

I think this is not a very popular brand on this forum. Anyone know why?

Because it's a big unknown, and therefore has no mental space in people's minds vs. better known wheels.

They could add a lot of goodwill (aka sales) if they talked more about their wheels, with dealers, here, wherever. Just about the facts. Simply communication. The engineering seems quite competent. But right now, we know not much about the wheel other than it does exist and isn't bad at all (and that we know only from user reports).

Even Gotway put out official spec sheets and info right from the start (eben though it may have been outdated or wrong). Where can any official info on the GT16 be found?

What is it's designed safe max speed? For what rider weight?

What kind of alarms, tiltbacks, and other safety measures and warnings and monitoring does it have?

What voltages are 0% and 100% battery?

Any details about the electronics? I'd like to know the motor wire gauges, e.g.

Hardware and board revisions (of which there were some)?

You can ask pretty much anything an interested enthusiast here would like to know, and there's no official answer anywhere to be found.

The RW guys actually do rarely post here (and then with great info), but a starting point for a conversation and building trust is totally missing. We simply don't know much official info about the wheel, we can't judge it. Is it better designed and constructed (safer) than Gotway, worse, far better? No idea!

I guess a big part is also simply the language barrier. They need someone with better English skills.

--

There's also the fact that it is (or used to be) a V1 with some small flaws (like to small clearances that lead to problems with the shell and the mudguard, e.g.) that should be fixed and people might want to wait for V2 (which is apparently out oficially now), and it's more or less only sold on Ali (and some French shops, I guess).

But why is barely any dealer even selling it? Because they know nothing about it and have nobody to talk to about it. Did @Jason McNeil ever try and contact RW, or they him?

Maybe it's super popular in China and Korea and RW don't care as much about the Western market, but an official, shiny, halfway competent website and spec sheet is missing.

--

From what I've seen, they have some qualified guys and plans there, and could make more of this than simply selling on Ali with no comment.

Edited by meepmeepmayer
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I think you see it in the board and its behavior (more alarms etc). I believe also V2 has a bigger axle, and maybe that influenced the cabling.

@Scatcat's "GT16 oscillation" thread has most of the info about the wheel that we have. If you read through it, you get an impression.

 

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On 2017/9/17 at 12:17 AM, meepmeepmayer said:

Because it's a big unknown, and therefore has no mental space in people's minds vs. better known wheels.

They could add a lot of goodwill (aka sales) if they talked more about their wheels, with dealers, here, wherever. Just about the facts. Simply communication. The engineering seems quite competent. But right now, we know not much about the wheel other than it does exist and isn't bad at all (and that we know only from user reports).

Even Gotway put out official spec sheets and info right from the start (eben though it may have been outdated or wrong). Where can any official info on the GT16 be found?

What is it's designed safe max speed? For what rider weight?

What kind of alarms, tiltbacks, and other safety measures and warnings and monitoring does it have?

What voltages are 0% and 100% battery?

Any details about the electronics? I'd like to know the motor wire gauges, e.g.

Hardware and board revisions (of which there were some)?

You can ask pretty much anything an interested enthusiast here would like to know, and there's no official answer anywhere to be found.

The RW guys actually do rarely post here (and then with great info), but a starting point for a conversation and building trust is totally missing. We simply don't know much official info about the wheel, we can't judge it. Is it better designed and constructed (safer) than Gotway, worse, far better? No idea!

I guess a big part is also simply the language barrier. They need someone with better English skills.

--

There's also the fact that it is (or used to be) a V1 with some small flaws (like to small clearances that lead to problems with the shell and the mudguard, e.g.) that should be fixed and people might want to wait for V2 (which is apparently out oficially now), and it's more or less only sold on Ali (and some French shops, I guess).

But why is barely any dealer even selling it? Because they know nothing about it and have nobody to talk to about it. Did @Jason McNeil ever try and contact RW, or they him?

Maybe it's super popular in China and Korea and RW don't care as much about the Western market, but an official, shiny, halfway competent website and spec sheet is missing.

--

From what I've seen, they have some qualified guys and plans there, and could make more of this than simply selling on Ali with no comment.

Thanks for impressed and objective comment.There is a fact that we had miss Western market and also lack of official info interacting with all fans of EUC.I will take more concention on conversation with all fans in later.When refer to Rockwheel GT16,there are so many people amazing its housing  and performance.It just like a off-roard car in area of EUC.

 

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On 2017/9/17 at 12:17 AM, meepmeepmayer said:

Because it's a big unknown, and therefore has no mental space in people's minds vs. better known wheels.

They could add a lot of goodwill (aka sales) if they talked more about their wheels, with dealers, here, wherever. Just about the facts. Simply communication. The engineering seems quite competent. But right now, we know not much about the wheel other than it does exist and isn't bad at all (and that we know only from user reports).

Even Gotway put out official spec sheets and info right from the start (eben though it may have been outdated or wrong). Where can any official info on the GT16 be found?

What is it's designed safe max speed? For what rider weight?

What kind of alarms, tiltbacks, and other safety measures and warnings and monitoring does it have?

What voltages are 0% and 100% battery?

Any details about the electronics? I'd like to know the motor wire gauges, e.g.

Hardware and board revisions (of which there were some)?

You can ask pretty much anything an interested enthusiast here would like to know, and there's no official answer anywhere to be found.

The RW guys actually do rarely post here (and then with great info), but a starting point for a conversation and building trust is totally missing. We simply don't know much official info about the wheel, we can't judge it. Is it better designed and constructed (safer) than Gotway, worse, far better? No idea!

I guess a big part is also simply the language barrier. They need someone with better English skills.

--

There's also the fact that it is (or used to be) a V1 with some small flaws (like to small clearances that lead to problems with the shell and the mudguard, e.g.) that should be fixed and people might want to wait for V2 (which is apparently out oficially now), and it's more or less only sold on Ali (and some French shops, I guess).

But why is barely any dealer even selling it? Because they know nothing about it and have nobody to talk to about it. Did @Jason McNeil ever try and contact RW, or they him?

Maybe it's super popular in China and Korea and RW don't care as much about the Western market, but an official, shiny, halfway competent website and spec sheet is missing.

--

From what I've seen, they have some qualified guys and plans there, and could make more of this than simply selling on Ali with no comment.

What is it's designed safe max speed? For what rider weight?

45km/h,somebody can up to 49km/h or more.120KG

What kind of alarms, tiltbacks, and other safety measures and warnings and monitoring does it have?

Highlights break lights.Wraped plate protection.

What voltages are 0% and 100% battery?

82V,858WH,1036WH

Any details about the electronics? I'd like to know the motor wire gauges, e.g.

More technology you can see in:

Hardware and board revisions (of which there were some)?

I am sorry  to tell all fans that  revisions and  improvements always forgotten by us .

Believe us ,we will do it better and better.

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On 2017/9/16 at 6:00 PM, Barry Chen said:
Review of the Rockwheel GT16
Update (13 Sept 2017): See “One Month On ...” at the bottom of this article.
It’s been more than a week since I received my GT16 v2, and oh boy do I love it!
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I've always liked to experience wheels that are the "first" of their kind here, from the first Gotway (MCM2) to officially hit our shores, to its rival the Kingsong 14C, then the revolutionary Kingsong 16B, and now the upstart kid the Rockwheel GT16!
A Rockwheel had always been something that I’d wanted to own since back in the days when they produced their distinctive geared wheels. Those were noisy wheels to be sure, but I’d always likened them as the Harley Davidsons of EUCs. Iconic wheels of their time with a unique and throaty growl that set them apart from other wheels. The exalted elite amongst the backdrop of the mediocre and the wannabes. Yet reported problems of their geared motors put a sad end to my interest and ambition. Then this GTR of wheels came about.
Herein lies my honest review of the GT16, both the good and the not-so-good.
The Good

Design & Build

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Its beauty cannot be denied. Not since the Ninebot One has another wheel been produced with such a distinctive look. Its “exposed-tire” design is reminiscent of the classic IPS, but where the IPS looked minimalist and rugged in a subtly sexy sort of way, there is nothing subtle about the Rockwheel GT16. The combination of the “exposed-tire” with a slim and futuristic looking chassis brings to my mind the image of a hired assassin clad in a flowing night dress, with one long slim leg peeking out from the side slit, the hilt of a dagger peeking out.
Rockwheel had also thoughtfully included a retractable mudguard at the rear of the wheel. Nicely designed, and certainly very useful on wet paths. Given it’s speed and the exposed tire, you’ll certain need it!
The trolley is not integrated like Kingsong or Inmotion, which is a shame. However, it is made to measure for the GT16, fits like a glove, and overall feels quite solidly built. Once retracted, you’d almost not notice it (unless you’re anal about integration).

Performance & Handling

Unlike a Kingsong 16B or S, the weight of this wheel is very well-centered and balanced, and you should not feel it pulling you down when you’re half-mounted (one leg on the ground, the other on the wheel). Incredibly, it is also extremely easy to maneuver, so much so it almost felt like a 14’ wheel! Easily the most agile 16’ wheel I’d ever had or tested. And the GT16 continues to be stable even at higher speeds. No feeling of wobbliness or imbalance. As an ex-KS16 owner (KS is very popular in my country), I dare say that the GT16 is much more stable than the stock KS16B/S. Keep to a lower PSI if you wish to improve the stability even further. Does it need a 2.5 modification like the KS16B/S 2.5 (a locally modified version where the 2.125’ tires are replaced with 2.5’ to greatly improve its stability)? At this point in time, I don’t think so.
The performance is incredible. The motor packs plenty of power, and acceleration is effortless. When I demanded similar power from other wheels, I could always feel the effort once past a certain point. But never with the GT16, which only hums smoothly to my demands. On paper, this should only be natural given its higher performance specs, yet feeling it is believing. Wow!
Any enforced reduction in power/speed at low battery levels like the KS? Nope. So rejoice! But please manage this freedom with care.
Powercut or faceplant from a lack of power/torque? You shouldn’t. Not with its 2000W motor (3000W peak). Heavy riders or steep slopes should not be a problem. During my rides, I tried going over tricky terrain, and sometimes encountered unexpected holes or obstacles that caused me to suddenly dip or lean forward at a steep angle before I caught myself and quickly leaned back (Amen to a stronger core from more than 2 years of wheeling). The wheel just continued on normally. If it had a voice, it probably just went “Huh? What do you mean something happened? I didn’t feel anything!”.

Mobile App

Compared to competitors, the Rockwheel mobile app is pretty basic. You get to set the ride mode, the alarms (usual 3 levels) and the tilt-back. There is no option for a firmware update like what is available for Ninebot and Kingsong.
The Not So Good

Design & Build

20729079_10155212870733005_4969553854467
The beautiful body, with its little nooks and crannies, ironically makes it a little difficult to clean. And the GT16 certainly kicks up a lot of dirt and mud from the roads, given its performance and how “open” the wheel is. Expect the body and the mudguard to get dirty easily.
I also noticed that the mudguard can be a little difficult to pull down, and might be due to the tight integration with the chassis. It’s easier to extend if you leave it drawn down a little instead of fully flushed into the chassis (don’t worry, it’s tight enough not to drop when riding). Another issue with the mudguard is that when fully extended, it is very close to the tire, and might rub against it when you’re riding. So my advice is don’t fully extend it.
Perhaps my biggest disappointment of all is the softness of the body. For example, it picks up cuts and scratches easily. A simple drop of the wheel is enough to leave scars on the chassis. So don’t wipe out, which shouldn’t be a problem if you are wheeling safely.
I’ve heard feedback from friends that during one-leg maneuvers, the wheel rubs onto the tire. Personally I’ve not experienced it when I did such stunts. If I had to theorize, it might be due to the softer chassis that causes it to “flex” inwards from the pressure. However, I do know that the chassis is designed so that it can be simply lifted off from the tire (unlike other wheels that tend to be designed differently), so the internal design might also be a factor. Regardless, it’s something to keep in mind if one-leg stunts are your daily thing,

Comfort & Safety

The pedals are a little small, somewhere between an X3 and a Kingsong/Inmotion. If you’ve used small-pedaled wheels before (e.g. Airwheel-resque), then it shouldn’t be a bother once you’ve adjusted to it. Newer riders used to (or spoiled by) the large pedals of modern wheels may find it harder to get used to. The result is more fatigue on your feet over long distances. How much harder? Well it depends since YMMV (Your Mileage May Vary).
20746024_10155212899093005_5046517140687
It’s also disbelieving to me that the rubberized top of the pedal (which you step on) is completely ... flat. Yes, it’s flat and smooth with no markings whatsoever. Was Rockwheel plain lazy/cheap, or was it thinking that no amount of rubber markings was good enough and so it forced riders to install grip tapes onto the flat surface (well, flat certainly makes the installation easier)? I hope it’s the latter.
I must also point out that the area where your ankles touch the wheel is flat and hard. There is no depression or rubber padding to soften the contact, and new riders will likely feel uncomfortable or even painful during prolonged rides. Having used the older generation of wheels with similar design issues, I’m used to it and experience little to no pain. Riders will get used to it with practice. Wear comfortable shoes/socks in the meantime to protect your ankles.
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Lastly, the side padding is a little small (compared to e.g. the KS16), with a depression in the middle to accommodate the leg. Sounds good in theory, but at the beginning, my legs rested at the back end of the padding, almost on the edge! I tend to ride with my feet closer to the back of the pedal, as it allows me to hard brake more easily when I encounter unexpected obstacles (like dumb pedestrians!). I’ve adapted to the padding, but new owners should expect some transition time to get used to it.
Conclusion
Compare a family car to a race car. The former has leather seats, lots of bells and whistles, maybe even executive features. The domesticated you will feel comfortable and sleepy sitting in it, and you’ll not hear complaints from your wife or the in-laws about it. But the race car is pure adrenaline and power packed into a carbon-fibre body with hard suspension and race seats. Your wife and the in-laws might complain to the heavens about it, but you and your hot girlfriend certainly ain’t complaining.
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The GT16 v2 is the race car, pure and simple. Sure, you might have to adjust from having driven your sedan for so long, but hey you’re not compromising when you choose it. You simply know what really matters to you in the end. Everything else is pure marketing.
And no, I don’t have a “hot girlfriend”. That’s simply a figure of speech 1f61b.png:P
One month on ...
It's been exactly one month since I published this note, and at least 6 weeks since I started using my GT16 v2.
I figure that it's time to share my post-notes on this wheel.
First, I haven't tired of the look of my new mistress ... I mean wheel ... lol!
Second, the handling remains exceptional. I'd written of the improved balance and ease of handling, and there is no better example then during daily use like when you are playing around with it (e.g. reverse, twisting, jumping, etc), going amongst crowds, or encounter sudden obstacles. For example, start-stops and slow riding amongst crowds is easy. And in a few recent moments, I "flew" over high-profile cable covers that I realized only at the last minute, and was able to land safely; the centred weight helped a lot, and the smaller chassis (compared to other 16' wheels) was no hindrance to me at all.
Third, foot position and comfort. In particular the full-on, no bullshit, no rubber padding between ankle and chassis. It may be due to my early experience with old wheel models, but I don't notice it anymore now, so that has become a negligible point.
Fourth, the side padding with its depression. I'd adapted a little by shifting my footing forward. I also realize that during cruising, as I tended to lean forward anyway, my legs would naturally rest into this depression. Even during times when my legs were resting outside the depression, I still felt comfortable.
Fifth, hard braking. Due to my foot position being further forward, it affected my ability to hard brake when I use my heels to press down hard on the rear end of the pedals. This has now significantly improved for me ever since I adopted a crouched (squat) position more often during braking, which I also think is a better and safer approach in general.
Sixth, the wheel has continued to perform without slip-ups on slippery surfaces. I avoid obvious danger zones (e.g. glass, smooth metal), but even when I do go onto some dangerous areas like carpets, rocks, smooth tiles and wet areas, the stock tire continues to perform well, and the centred weight and good handling were immense help in keeping me stable. I did have 1-2 minor slips, but the great handling allowed me to easily shift and control the wheel to regain my balance.
The GT16 v2 has continued to check all my boxes one month on, and as expected when you change wheels, a short period of adaptation is needed. I remain delighted with my purchase, and it's a wheel that I will highly recommend to others.
If you had any doubts and suggestions,please discuss with us.

Off-road riding is an excite things in sunshine day.Once you see  ,you can't believe it .

 

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I really like the look and performance specifications of the GT16, but the issues with the shell casing always troubled me.  After viewing some of the disassembly videos, I noticed that there are two windows of wax paper that need to be cut away to access cabling which is odd to me.  The case looks slick, but it could use some more wheel coverage on the back especially to prevent splashback rather than depend on a flimsy fender extension.  With those slotted, recessed side areas, they could have easily placed in there a a set of red light bars in the rear and a set of 5050 white LED front light bars for accessory headlights to help with night time riding.

Why need to channel air through the casing when you could have flipped the control board so that the cooling fins face upwards and outwards out of the case at the top?  Make the control board area sealed and water tight.  Heat rises and having an exposed cooling radiator isn't the worst thing in the world.  Place a mesh cover over the fins if you want to make it look pretty.

Unfortunately after seeing Scatcat's wave washer disintegration experience, I've moved away from the GT16 on my list of wheels to get.  Maybe in a future revision with a lot more improvements it will be a contender once more.

Edited by Hunka Hunka Burning Love
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10 hours ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

I really like the look and performance specifications of the GT16, but the issues with the shell casing always troubled me.  After viewing some of the disassembly videos, I noticed that there are two windows of wax paper that need to be cut away to access cabling which is odd to me.  The case looks slick, but it could use some more wheel coverage on the back especially to prevent splashback rather than depend on a flimsy fender extension.  With those slotted, recessed side areas, they could have easily placed in there a a set of red light bars in the rear and a set of 5050 white LED front light bars for accessory headlights to help with night time riding.

Why need to channel air through the casing when you could have flipped the control board so that the cooling fins face upwards and outwards out of the case at the top?  Make the control board area sealed and water tight.  Heat rises and having an exposed cooling radiator isn't the worst thing in the world.  Place a mesh cover over the fins if you want to make it look pretty.

Unfortunately after seeing Scatcat's wave washer disintegration experience, I've moved away from the GT16 on my list of wheels to get.  Maybe in a future revision with a lot more improvements it will be a contender once more.

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

 

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11 hours ago, kasenutty said:

I love the GT16 too, I only fear that it would fall apart and I wouldn't be able to get any parts or help. 

If u fear ur GT16 breakdown u can add some bumper strips.If u farmiliar with GT16 ,you can not come across breakdonw .

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10 minutes ago, Barry Chen said:

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

10 minutes ago, Barry Chen said:

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

 

GT16 upgrade:

12 hours ago, Scatcat said:

I think the reasons for Rockwheel not being among the major players are:

  1. They released this a bit early, and first impressions last, as they say. The first batches had a few problems, as almost no security measures, very little water-proofing and other teething/quality problems.
  2. They have just this model in V1/V2/V2 large battery, while others have 10/12/14/16/18 and even 22" wheels in their lineup. This gives the impression of an outsider, a small garage-type manufacturer - which is something of a turn-off.
  3. They have a few quirks: Like the shock-damper in the pedals, that need periodical maintenance. It's a piece of medium hard silicone-plastic, glued into place. Like the perceived softness of the shell, which really isn't that soft, but is so compact that it flexes more than many others. Like the nooks and crannies of the design where dirt may stick, which becomes worse as it really isn't a good idea to use the hose to hose it down. Like the fact that even i V2 there is a small air-duct that ends up inside the PCB compartment (the reason it's not a good idea to hose it down). There are nooks and crannies inside too, like the cable compartment that is glued tight with a piece of plexi. That solution isn't really ideal, to say the least.
  4. There have been rumours of cut-offs and fried boards. Most of those is because of point one above, but the reputation lingers.

For those buying it, if you know how to handle servicing yourself:

  • Balance charge the wheel.
  • Screw of the sides and disconnect the batteries (don't yank it off, there's a LED-cable to disconnect. Also, both sides and make sure to put a piece of masking tape on the battery terminals).
  • Turn on the wheel to empty the capacitors.
  • Pop the lid to the PCB compartment (carefully!!! those are plastic holders, don't yank, disconnect the power button and LED cables first.)
  • Put a little bit of masking tape on the exposed connectors on the board.
  • Spray the board with a generous amount of conformal coating spray, enough to really cover the circuits.
  • Let it dry for half an hour or so.
  • Reverse the process and put it back together.

Now you have added a nice level of protection from one of the least brilliant parts of the design, the risk of a drop of water getting into the air-vent and on to the board frying stuff.

But to try to give a fair summary:

There are, like with all current mfg's some QC problems. Mostly it's idiotic things, outsourcing problems, like the pedal arms, that have had top bridges with too deep holes for the bolts, and that have had tolerance problems. For instance my current pedal arms differ in width by 1.5-2mm. This means one side of the shell goes on without issue, while the other is almost too tight. A really high standard QC would have caught such a problem and made sure no too wide pedals arms shipped at all. An earlier pair of pedal arms had cracks in the top bridge, because of overtightening, also a stupid mfg-/QC-problem.

I would like a wider tyre, mostly to make long runs even more effortless. I would like bigger pedals, to relieve the pressure on my feet some. The motor cables could well be fatter, my guess is that they're 14 AWG where they should be 10 or at least 12. The isolation on the cables in the new motor seem good though. They're stranded, but with each strand being on the thicker side.

As noted above, I've had a few problems myself. Those are mainly because my wheel started out as a first-batch. Now all that is remaining of my original EUC are the batteries, the rest is V2, and I feel quite confident when riding it.

Then we have the positives, like the exceptional agility, while still being a stable wheel. Like the effortless acceleration and braking. Like the fact that there is no exposed electronics below the axle, which means that even if some water would leak into the battery compartment, it wouldn't automatically become a catastrophe. Like the easy to see battery gauge on top. Like the very clear breaking lights. Like the wonderful compactness. Like the power to overcome pot-holes and unexpected bumps.

The cooling is superb, the PCB have never been above 40°C while I've ridden it. I guess that if I went up and down hills for long it may get a bit higher, but there aren't enough hills around to confirm that. The plus side of the cable compartment, is that it is adjacent to the air-ducts, so the cables gets cooled down a bit too.

AFAIC it's very energy efficient, consuming about four to six volts to get me from home to work, a trip of about 7-8 miles. Starting at 84V I usually have some 78-80V left at the destination. And that's with a 858Wh pack. Less if I go 20mph+, more if I cruise at 17-18mph. It also "floats" along, as if there is nothing holding it back.

The responsiveness is wonderful, even going fast, I can make rather sharp turns. The pedals are rather high up, but the centre of gravity is low, which means pedal scraping is unlikely and both agility and stability is good. It is probably less stable than a Tesla, or an 18", but there is very little wobble tendencies at high speed. The ride mode is very stiff, but since the reaction to input is so good, you'll forget the stiffness and in time wonder how you handled softer rides. It also has a tendency to "catch" you - keeping the pedals straight in maneuvers where others suffer from pedal dip. The "catching" also goes for the tilt-back, which just happens - you overtax the wheel, then you don't. I haven't ever been close to feeling unstable or scared by the tilt-back so far, but I guess that if you set it so high that there are no margins, it may become more abrupt.

I'd say people should really try it if they get the chance, I think quite a few of you would fall in love.

I know u are the loyal fans of GT16.Thanks for point out that our shortcoming and merit.As ur mention tilt-back ,we will upgrade for other  model in future .Believe us ,all we do is not say but action and get progress.All almost EUC fan know that our product in high quality and the price of EUC is economic.

 

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12 hours ago, kasenutty said:

I love the GT16 too, I only fear that it would fall apart and I wouldn't be able to get any parts or help. 

Rockwheel store on AliExpress can get you whatever part you'd ever need. Yi Chen is a true nugget to deal with, always helpful. The risk of the thing falling apart isn't any higher than for example a Gotway.

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1 hour ago, Barry Chen said:

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

 

The damage to my old motor was a true fluke, the new motor has both a stronger shaft and different washers. So I wouldn't worry overmuch about it. I've ridden for two months straight >15 miles a day on the new motor, and so far it is flawless.

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13 hours ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

I really like the look and performance specifications of the GT16, but the issues with the shell casing always troubled me.  After viewing some of the disassembly videos, I noticed that there are two windows of wax paper that need to be cut away to access cabling which is odd to me.  The case looks slick, but it could use some more wheel coverage on the back especially to prevent splashback rather than depend on a flimsy fender extension.  With those slotted, recessed side areas, they could have easily placed in there a a set of red light bars in the rear and a set of 5050 white LED front light bars for accessory headlights to help with night time riding.

Why need to channel air through the casing when you could have flipped the control board so that the cooling fins face upwards and outwards out of the case at the top?  Make the control board area sealed and water tight.  Heat rises and having an exposed cooling radiator isn't the worst thing in the world.  Place a mesh cover over the fins if you want to make it look pretty.

Unfortunately after seeing Scatcat's wave washer disintegration experience, I've moved away from the GT16 on my list of wheels to get.  Maybe in a future revision with a lot more improvements it will be a contender once more.

As I said in the post above, the motor damage wasn't something you can reasonable expect. And the new motor is better built.

The bloody windows are one of the true nuisances of the design. You need an exacto to cut the glue and a guitar-pick or somesuch to pry it loose. It may break anyway, mine did.

My solution to that was a piece of duct-tape to hold the cracked plexi together, then a piece of black duct tape to glue it back in place. This has the advantage of making it easy to take apart again, and the duct tape is pretty good keeping moisture and dust at bay. The padding is on top of it, so there is no visible clue that it is taped in place :D

The only idiosyncrasies I find truly annoying, are:

  • The plexis. It is a very strange solution.
  • The air-holes into the PCB compartment. They're totally not necessary.
  • The strange quality issues of the pedal arms. A change of subcontractor would be good, functional QC would be even better.

But I've so far seen no signs of drop-solders, substandard electronics or whatever - which is more than can be said of another more "popular" brand... Having six heavy duty MOS are probably a better alternative than 12 less capable ones. Especially the new card I got after my "adventures", is very clean and seem perfectly made. With some coating on it I feel relaxed even in moderately heavy rain.

As discussed elsewhere, I may look into getting myself a Z10 as a second wheel when it gets out. That is mainly because I'm looking for another type of experience, that of a bigger and fatter wheel. Something that will be slightly more grippy in bad weather, on mud, wet leaves and so on. Something that won't rattle my teeth when going fast on cobble-stone quality roads. While the GT16 is capable of handling even such conditions, I would like to not have to "handle" it at all...

Unless the Z10 is much better than I think it is, I'll probably keep the GT16 too. There is something enthralling about weaving around pedestrians, bicycles and whatever, changing speeds from walking pace to scooter pace and back as if by mind-control. Because that is how it feels to me, as if I control it with a brain implant rather than with my feet.

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On 2017/9/29 at 4:38 PM, Barry Chen said:

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

On 2017/9/29 at 4:38 PM, Barry Chen said:

I glad u still focus on Rockwheel GT16,Maybe disassemble EUC is a diffcult thing for most player .But if u have necessary tool and learn to disassemble for times.I think that is not a diffcult thing.Your idea is reasonable for waterproof and heat dissipation but need time to test .

As u know ,what happen to Scatcat's wave washer disintegration that's because for the former model have something need to repair and for the bad material.Meanwhile u also see Scatcat's post about the change of GT16.That's to say the GT16V2.Whateveer for safe system program,quality of housing and controler ect.Much of them are repair and udgrade.After that u haven't see big problem.

 

GT16 upgrade:

On 2017/9/29 at 4:10 AM, Scatcat said:

I think the reasons for Rockwheel not being among the major players are:

  1. They released this a bit early, and first impressions last, as they say. The first batches had a few problems, as almost no security measures, very little water-proofing and other teething/quality problems.
  2. They have just this model in V1/V2/V2 large battery, while others have 10/12/14/16/18 and even 22" wheels in their lineup. This gives the impression of an outsider, a small garage-type manufacturer - which is something of a turn-off.
  3. They have a few quirks: Like the shock-damper in the pedals, that need periodical maintenance. It's a piece of medium hard silicone-plastic, glued into place. Like the perceived softness of the shell, which really isn't that soft, but is so compact that it flexes more than many others. Like the nooks and crannies of the design where dirt may stick, which becomes worse as it really isn't a good idea to use the hose to hose it down. Like the fact that even i V2 there is a small air-duct that ends up inside the PCB compartment (the reason it's not a good idea to hose it down). There are nooks and crannies inside too, like the cable compartment that is glued tight with a piece of plexi. That solution isn't really ideal, to say the least.
  4. There have been rumours of cut-offs and fried boards. Most of those is because of point one above, but the reputation lingers.

For those buying it, if you know how to handle servicing yourself:

  • Balance charge the wheel.
  • Screw of the sides and disconnect the batteries (don't yank it off, there's a LED-cable to disconnect. Also, both sides and make sure to put a piece of masking tape on the battery terminals).
  • Turn on the wheel to empty the capacitors.
  • Pop the lid to the PCB compartment (carefully!!! those are plastic holders, don't yank, disconnect the power button and LED cables first.)
  • Put a little bit of masking tape on the exposed connectors on the board.
  • Spray the board with a generous amount of conformal coating spray, enough to really cover the circuits.
  • Let it dry for half an hour or so.
  • Reverse the process and put it back together.

Now you have added a nice level of protection from one of the least brilliant parts of the design, the risk of a drop of water getting into the air-vent and on to the board frying stuff.

But to try to give a fair summary:

There are, like with all current mfg's some QC problems. Mostly it's idiotic things, outsourcing problems, like the pedal arms, that have had top bridges with too deep holes for the bolts, and that have had tolerance problems. For instance my current pedal arms differ in width by 1.5-2mm. This means one side of the shell goes on without issue, while the other is almost too tight. A really high standard QC would have caught such a problem and made sure no too wide pedals arms shipped at all. An earlier pair of pedal arms had cracks in the top bridge, because of overtightening, also a stupid mfg-/QC-problem.

I would like a wider tyre, mostly to make long runs even more effortless. I would like bigger pedals, to relieve the pressure on my feet some. The motor cables could well be fatter, my guess is that they're 14 AWG where they should be 10 or at least 12. The isolation on the cables in the new motor seem good though. They're stranded, but with each strand being on the thicker side.

As noted above, I've had a few problems myself. Those are mainly because my wheel started out as a first-batch. Now all that is remaining of my original EUC are the batteries, the rest is V2, and I feel quite confident when riding it.

Then we have the positives, like the exceptional agility, while still being a stable wheel. Like the effortless acceleration and braking. Like the fact that there is no exposed electronics below the axle, which means that even if some water would leak into the battery compartment, it wouldn't automatically become a catastrophe. Like the easy to see battery gauge on top. Like the very clear breaking lights. Like the wonderful compactness. Like the power to overcome pot-holes and unexpected bumps.

The cooling is superb, the PCB have never been above 40°C while I've ridden it. I guess that if I went up and down hills for long it may get a bit higher, but there aren't enough hills around to confirm that. The plus side of the cable compartment, is that it is adjacent to the air-ducts, so the cables gets cooled down a bit too.

AFAIC it's very energy efficient, consuming about four to six volts to get me from home to work, a trip of about 7-8 miles. Starting at 84V I usually have some 78-80V left at the destination. And that's with a 858Wh pack. Less if I go 20mph+, more if I cruise at 17-18mph. It also "floats" along, as if there is nothing holding it back.

The responsiveness is wonderful, even going fast, I can make rather sharp turns. The pedals are rather high up, but the centre of gravity is low, which means pedal scraping is unlikely and both agility and stability is good. It is probably less stable than a Tesla, or an 18", but there is very little wobble tendencies at high speed. The ride mode is very stiff, but since the reaction to input is so good, you'll forget the stiffness and in time wonder how you handled softer rides. It also has a tendency to "catch" you - keeping the pedals straight in maneuvers where others suffer from pedal dip. The "catching" also goes for the tilt-back, which just happens - you overtax the wheel, then you don't. I haven't ever been close to feeling unstable or scared by the tilt-back so far, but I guess that if you set it so high that there are no margins, it may become more abrupt.

I'd say people should really try it if they get the chance, I think quite a few of you would fall in love.

I know u are the loyal fans of GT16.Thanks for point out that our shortcoming and merit.As ur mention tilt-back ,we will upgrade for other  model in future .Believe us ,all we do is not say but action and get progress.All almost EUC fan know that our product in high quality and the price of EUC is economic.

Disassem GT16 and look inside to the motherboard.Waterproof are upgrade ect.

https://www.espritroue.fr/topic/3522-d%C3%A9montage-gt16-bonne-nouvelle/

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7 hours ago, Barry Chen said:

Disassem GT16 and look inside to the motherboard.Waterproof are upgrade ect.

https://www.espritroue.fr/topic/3522-d%C3%A9montage-gt16-bonne-nouvelle/

Hmm, I wonder what kind of silicone he used? Most liquid silicone I've come across acts like glue, which would make service a pain unless you use "silicone remover"...

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3 hours ago, Robert Hoffmann said:

He let the silicon dry before reassembling so it just acts as a rubber joint

Ah! Smart guy! (slaps palm in face). Sometimes simple solutions are so simple my convoluted brain searchs for complicated ones :D 

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Btw I bought this wheel as my first wheel last week. Never rode a euc before that. Today I already have a little over 120km on the wheel and will soon be able to ride backwards ^^

 

It's fast, nimble, and sales support was great. I did have a few bugs that I'm still figuring out if it's me or the wheel, but all in all I'm pretty happy with my purchase for now ..but I have no comparison points ! :-)

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32 minutes ago, Robert Hoffmann said:

Btw I bought this wheel as my first wheel last week. Never rode a euc before that. Today I already have a little over 120km on the wheel and will soon be able to ride backwards ^^

 

It's fast, nimble, and sales support was great. I did have a few bugs that I'm still figuring out if it's me or the wheel, but all in all I'm pretty happy with my purchase for now ..but I have no comparison points ! :-)

Hi, I would like to know in what country you bought your GT26.

 

:)

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