Jump to content

Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, Rocky Romero said:

A new study has come out stating that too much sitting is not good even if working out.

http://fox59.com/2017/09/14/yes-sitting-too-long-can-kill-you-no-matter-how-much-you-exercise/

Would riding frequently reduce the negative effects of too much sitting?

The usual confusion between correlation and causation. The study can't tell us anything about how changing our behaviour (say, sit less) would change our life expectancy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gained 10kg in weight, switching from longboarding to EUC as main device of transportation :(  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, caelus said:

I gained 10kg in weight, switching from longboarding to EUC as main device of transportation :(  

Would that be because of no longer extending your legs?

Continuously?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Rocky, extending legs or not - it is just vastly different level of exercise. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, caelus said:

I gained 10kg in weight, switching from longboarding to EUC as main device of transportation :(  

me too

in 3300 km with my mini i gained 12kg and lost battery life :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, ir_fuel said:

It's a conspiray. That way they force you to buy a more expensive wheel :P 

im riding in mini and yes, i m buying actually new mini modele with more "range"? 35km , more powerfull faster and higher and me i will more bigger
more lazy & more lousy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, ir_fuel said:

Unless you go off-road, euc is as much of an exercise as simply standing up.

It's a mixed bag. I think from EUC you get quite some impulses for equilibrioception. But not much physical exercise. On the other hand, it is so much fun, that I spend more time outdoors. And just going somewhere, where I didn't need to go. 

On the cons side, you mostly doing that allone. As I am just so much quicker than anyone else.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, caelus said:

On the cons side, you mostly doing that allone. As I am just so much quicker than anyone else.

 

Thats why i bought second mini for my wife ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, caelus said:

It's a mixed bag. I think from EUC you get quite some impulses for equilibrioception.

For what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Alex Markin said:

Thats why i bought second mini for my wife ;)

Yes, my wife and I ride as often together on weekends as possible.

And have a spare MiniPro for a guest or backup.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, ir_fuel said:

Unless you go off-road, euc is as much of an exercise as simply standing up.

Most certainly not. How this is rather obvious to see is that a human-shaped dummy can stand up, but it can't ride an EUC. To ride an EUC dynamic (i.e. time-changing) control of force and (small) movement is needed, which happens by muscle engagement. Control needs to be applied in two directions, forward-back (done by changing foot angle or applied pressure) and sidewards left-right.

EDIT: of course additionally even non-off-road the knees need better to be ready all the time to act as suspension device.

Edited by Mono

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mono said:

Most certainly not. How this is rather obvious to see is that a human-shaped dummy can stand up, but it can't ride an EUC. To ride an EUC dynamic (i.e. time-changing) control of force and (small) movement is needed, which happens by muscle engagement. Control needs to be applied in two directions, forward-back (done by changing foot angle or applied pressure) and sidewards left-right.

Yeah, something like that :) 

You don't think your body needs to apply control to stay upright? Standing up by itself is not "magic" without any use of muscles. Otherwise people wouldn't want to sit down after standing for several hours.

The amount of extra muscle movement compared to standing is next to nothing. If it weren't you would be exhausted after a 30km ride, or you wouldn't be able to complete more than 5km in the beginning without muscle ache, needing to train muscle endurance to go further and further. And since anyone who learns to ride an euc can ride for 20km after a week of practice, I think it's not physical at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ir_fuel said:

For what?

It's kind of brain training. Which is as important as physical training.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, caelus said:

It's kind of brain training. Which is as important as physical training.

I see.

Won't stop you from getting fat though :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rocky Romero said:

And have a spare MiniPro for a guest or backup.➰

2 wheelers wouldn't work here in Berlin. Cycle paths are too narrow and uneven, sidewalk can be very crowded, you need to frequently hop up and down curbs, carry the wheel up and down stairs when using public transportation, or combine it with a car. Also I think they make you even more lazy. 

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, caelus said:

2 wheelers wouldn't work here in Berlin. Cycle paths are too narrow and uneven, sidewalk can be very crowded, you need to frequently hop up and down curbs, carry the wheel up and down stairs when using public transportation, or combine it with a car. Also I think they make you even more lazy. 

I was hoping to do a MiniPro/MiniPlus ride in Berlin or different parts of Germany in the future. 

Hopefully, pathways continue to improve as they have in modern cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Rocky, Here is an example of typical Berlin bicycle lane:
3-formatOriginal.jpg

The traffic is quite easygoing though. So cycling works quite well in Berlin, just be prepared for a lot of chaotic lane shape. 
The cycling infrastructure is budgeted for huge overhaul, as Berlin has approved a new cycling law - but that can take a while (see Berlin Airport).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/17/2017 at 10:08 AM, caelus said:

@Rocky, Here is an example of typical Berlin bicycle lane:
3-formatOriginal.jpg

The traffic is quite easygoing though. So cycling works quite well in Berlin, just be prepared for a lot of chaotic lane shape. 
The cycling infrastructure is budgeted for huge overhaul, as Berlin has approved a new cycling law - but that can take a while (see Berlin Airport).

Cities are making efforts.  Then politics gets in the way.

Recently, since 2001, a bike overpass has been in the works in Chicago to smooth over a rough stretch that interferes biking on the lakefront.

The cost has escalated to $60 million dollars and has taken longer than the famous Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

http://chi.streetsblog.org/2017/05/05/117827/

Maybe next year, this will be completed.

Maybe next year for many cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/16/2017 at 6:22 PM, caelus said:

2 wheelers wouldn't work here in Berlin. Cycle paths are too narrow and uneven, sidewalk can be very crowded, you need to frequently hop up and down curbs, carry the wheel up and down stairs when using public transportation, or combine it with a car. Also I think they make you even more lazy. 

Laziness is not so bad, at times.

Currently traveling through different parts of Italy, I have a greater appreciation of the MiniPro.  I am now much more aware of what life is without one.

Essentially, the MiniPro is a form of an exoskeleton, applied to the legs.  Yes, I know exoskeleton, by a loose definition, applies to a closer muscle movement in the body.  The future is exoskeleton garments that would provide 10X strength (depending on the brand) and possibly Kevlar components to protect the body.  Already I have seen experiments like these.

Further, I think future iterations of the MiniPro/ MiniPlus should/would incorporate climbing stairs.

Perhaps, at one point in the future, standing or sitting may be irrelevant.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎15‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 6:33 PM, Rocky Romero said:

A new study has come out stating that too much sitting is not good even if working out.

http://fox59.com/2017/09/14/yes-sitting-too-long-can-kill-you-no-matter-how-much-you-exercise/

Would riding frequently reduce the negative effects of too much sitting?

Riding the MiniPro is definitely better for the body than sitting still, but only marginally.  Sitting in a chair all day is harmful to the body for a number of reasons, including the fact that the joints are not moving.  Joints need to move in order to get lubrication and nutrients into them.  They do not have the same blood supply that organs do, so they need to move regularly.  The lymphatic system also requires movement in order to "pump" the lymph fluid around and clear out toxins, and so sitting sedentary all day every day can lead to a build up of toxic substances in the lymph nodes and in the body in general.  Then there's the general reason of not getting enough exercise, which is the more obvious one.

Riding a longboard is actual exercise.  One uses most of the muscles in the body to do this and it really is quite vigorous exercise.  Riding the MiniPro is, as someone else said, not much more work than standing up, at least when compared to the amount of exercise one does when manual longboarding, running or walking.  Obviously we are still using our muscles to maintain balance and to turn, but these are very slight movements, not enough to offer any significant health benefits for the body.  However, it does get us out in the fresh air more (unless you live in a built up city, in which case out in the smog more) and out in the sun; both of which are beneficial for physical health and mental well being.  When I ride my MiniPro in public areas I sometimes have people make playful comments such as that I'm being lazy or that I'm afraid of exercise.  What they don't realise is that by they time they see me out riding my MiniPro, I have already done 30 minutes of cardio and 45 minutes of weight training earlier in the day.  I ride for fun, convenience, time efficiency and environmental reasons, not because I don't value exercise. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, RooMiniPro said:

Riding the MiniPro is definitely better for the body than sitting still, but only marginally.  Sitting in a chair all day is harmful to the body for a number of reasons, including the fact that the joints are not moving.  Joints need to move in order to get lubrication and nutrients into them.  They do not have the same blood supply that organs do, so they need to move regularly.  The lymphatic system also requires movement in order to "pump" the lymph fluid around and clear out toxins, and so sitting sedentary all day every day can lead to a build up of toxic substances in the lymph nodes and in the body in general.  Then there's the general reason of not getting enough exercise, which is the more obvious one.

Riding a longboard is actual exercise.  One uses most of the muscles in the body to do this and it really is quite vigorous exercise.  Riding the MiniPro is, as someone else said, not much more work than standing up, at least when compared to the amount of exercise one does when manual longboarding, running or walking.  Obviously we are still using our muscles to maintain balance and to turn, but these are very slight movements, not enough to offer any significant health benefits for the body.  However, it does get us out in the fresh air more (unless you live in a built up city, in which case out in the smog more) and out in the sun; both of which are beneficial for physical health and mental well being.  When I ride my MiniPro in public areas I sometimes have people make playful comments such as that I'm being lazy or that I'm afraid of exercise.  What they don't realise is that by they time they see me out riding my MiniPro, I have already done 30 minutes of cardio and 45 minutes of weight training earlier in the day.  I ride for fun, convenience, time efficiency and environmental reasons, not because I don't value exercise. 

This is the clearest explanation that I have received on the health aspects of riding a MiniPro.

When at my office, I generally stand and walk ( even kick a soccer ball) when speaking on the phone.  This lubricates my joints, as you mentioned.  I do this simply because it energizes me in my conversation.  Now I have a more purposeful reason to continue.

Like you, I frequently strength train before riding the MiniPro outdoors.  I will return to doing cardio and stairs conditioning also, which I eliminated in my eagerness to get outside to ride.

You have very well expressed the reasons that I ride: for fun, convenience, time efficiency and environmental reasons.

And because I share rides with my wife and have an opportunity to meet interesting people, however brief that may be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Rocky Romero said:

 

And because I share rides with my wife and have an opportunity to meet interesting people, however brief that may be.

Yes companionship is wonderful too.  I ride once or twice with my partner.  She takes the MiniPro and I take the EUC.  I wish we had two MiniPros instead of the EUC.  EUCs can't stop, and I'm finding that to be more and more of a problem as time goes on.  The MiniPro is back to being my favourite of the two.  It's just so much more versatile and useable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×