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Is "hours riding" a better range measure than "distance"?


LanghamP
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Hear me out on this one.

We always talk about range but then complain how variable it is. Personally I've experienced a fully charged V5F+ going no more than 8 miles to the red bar, and 22 miles to the red bar, on different days.

But one thing that doesn't change much at all for me is "hours ridden". That is, while other factors do change, the length of time I can stand on my wheel stays very close to the same, each and every time out.

If I get two hours, and I'm brave and ride 15 miles per hour, then I get a range of 30 miles.

If I am not willing to role the die, and go 8 mph, then I get a range of 16.

Even going up and down hills versus flat still seems to be about two hours as regenerative braking makes up for the climbing.

Accelerate hard? Well, you get up to top speed faster, and so the time is about the same.

So I propose that instead of saying, "I get a range of x miles with this wheel", one could say, "I get x hours of riding time". How you use that riding time is up to you. 

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I don't get how you get the same battery usage if you ride for 2 hours at 15 mph or 8 mph. From my experience riding multiple wheels, I always end up using more battery the faster I go which translate into shorter time for the same distance.

But another point, measuring battery life of EUCs by distance (even if we have to give a range) is still better because ultimately EUCs are transportation devices. And consumers want to know how far they can go on one charge/tank. Tesla stopped advertising kWh battery sizes and instead have gone with miles of range. To try to measure battery life based on time implies that EUCs are just toys that you can have a few hours of fun on, instead of a legitimate transportation device that can take you X miles from A to B.

When people ask me what EUCs are, I give them the typical spiel of X speed and X miles on one charge. About 25% of them then ask me "how long does the battery last?". If they are in a group, the other people would say "He just told you". If not I say "Again, its X miles of range on one charge".

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37 minutes ago, LanghamP said:

If I get two hours, and I'm brave and ride 15 miles per hour, then I get a range of 30 miles.

If I am not willing to role the die, and go 8 mph, then I get a range of 16.

If I ride my wheel at 20-25 kph continuously, I get a range of 20-25 km, so around an hour of riding. If I ride my wheel at 10-15 kph, I get a range of 35-40 km, so 2-3 hours of riding... I think you missed something there. Your wheel should behave similar, in that the range in distance goes up as you ride slower, thus the riding time increases greatly.

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10 minutes ago, Slaughthammer said:

If I ride my wheel at 20-25 kph continuously, I get a range of 20-25 km, so around an hour of riding. If I ride my wheel at 10-15 kph, I get a range of 35-40 km, so 2-3 hours of riding... I think you missed something there. Your wheel should behave similar, in that the range in distance goes up as you ride slower, thus the riding time increases greatly.

Hmm, I get considerably more range the faster I go, being mindful that I rarely go above 15 mph. I get 8 vs 22 miles. 15 mph is not very fast and air resistance is negligible, so perhaps the wheel is spending most of its energy on keeping me uptight.

Might be my weight.

It'd be interesting in hearing what the 200+ pound crowd experiences.

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31 minutes ago, LanghamP said:

Hmm, I get considerably more range the faster I go, being mindful that I rarely go above 15 mph. I get 8 vs 22 miles. 15 mph is not very fast and air resistance is negligible, so perhaps the wheel is spending most of its energy on keeping me uptight.

Might be my weight.

It'd be interesting in hearing what the 200+ pound crowd experiences.

Congrats!!! you are the first then :-)

 

Its widely been measured, that the faster you go an any Euc, the more watthour are needed...

Mostly its 10-15wh per km on low speed...and 14-20wh per km on high speeds.

And that doesn't change on weight, until January i have been 105kg/230lbs, while now beeing 83kg/180lbs.

A faster running Euc needs more power/amps/watthours...thats an fact/physics.

You can see/control that yourself on an app like wheellog or gyrometrics btw.

 

What might play an role, if you are idling back and forth the wholetime, and braking/accelerating/dancing the whole time!

This consumes a LOT of energy...

But going steady 8mph or steady 15mph is no question...more range on the 8mph!

 

Edited by KingSong69
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@LanghamP My first 14-inch generic wheel acted kind of the way you describe, I suspect it was something about the controller because the batteries held a charge fine (still do after 3 years, really). My Firewheel and KS-14C definitely use less power when I go slower. I don't even bother to turn them off if I'm stopped for a few minutes and dismount because they don't seem to use much power that way.

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37 minutes ago, LanghamP said:

Hmm, I get considerably more range the faster I go, being mindful that I rarely go above 15 mph. I get 8 vs 22 miles. 15 mph is not very fast and air resistance is negligible, so perhaps the wheel is spending most of its energy on keeping me uptight.

Might be my weight.

It'd be interesting in hearing what the 200+ pound crowd experiences.

I get 65 miles on my Monster when riding at 20mph. I get 100 miles when riding at 15mph.

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Funny that I had the same though from a similar experience, but for reasons actually easy to explain. My range (from 85% battery) is rather stable 1h30, but may vary between about 15km and 30km. The reason is that I either commute at an average of 20km/h with a consumption of about 12Wh/km, or I practice crazy stuff with lots of acceleration and braking and an average of about 12km/h and a consumption of almost 20Wh/km.

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I think range as hours of riding is a better indicator of what you will do during the day. If your range is an hour or so you will either recharge after that time or call it a day.

Range as distance is a good indicator of  how to plan your start and end point along your route with the option of recharging when possible.

Big range requires a long recharge period.

Shorter range obviously requires frequent recharges (1 hour or so for Ninebot One E+) to continue to ride on the same day.

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