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If you fell off EUC and got injured in the last few years, how are you all doing now?

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4 hours ago, Chris Westland said:

It's actually a fracture on the outside of the radius.  It seems to be healing quickly, and I'm getting full use of my hand back (I can type with both hands now) but my doctor was concerned that the ulnar was moving towards the wrist (or the space between the radius and scaphoid was collapsing) so we'll see how that works out. 

BTW, they gave me a very innovative splint from 3M; it's thermoplastic, and has dial-lacing system.  Very easy to take on and off for showers, and much more comfortable than the plaster splints (looks better too).  I asked why these weren't standard, and he said that 3M wanted them to be, but doctors worried about patient compliance ... makes sense.

I have a couple of pictures ... I can't seem to get pics to upload to the forum anymore, so I have to put them on my server and give a URL. 

 

ChrisHand.jpg

 

IMG_7400.JPG

 

Sounds like good news! Wrist fxs can be tough because of the crossover action of the radius and ulna when you supinate and pronate. Everything must align properly or range of motion can be diminished. Are you currently allowed to move your hand in all directions? 

3M is so innovative! It looks like the dial can also be locked in place (small hole on dial) using a plastic zip tie. We have similar rope pulley systems to tighten back braces. The wrist brace you have is better than a cast as it can be adjusted for edema or if the swelling goes down.

Edited by Rehab1

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46 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

Sounds like good news! Wrist fxs can be tough because of the crossover action of the radius and ulna when you supinate and pronate. Everything must align properly or range of motion can be diminished. Are you currently allowed to move your hand in all directions? 

3M is so innovative! It looks like the dial can also be locked in place (small hole on dial) using a plastic zip tie. We have similar rope pulley systems to tighten back braces. The wrist brace you have is better than a cast as it can be adjusted for edema or if the swelling goes down.

The dial pops up to loosen; when you want to tighten, you click it in and turn ... Boa makes the dial-lacing system (https://www.theboasystem.com/).  I have no idea what it costs (Aetna picks it up) but am impressed with the technology and the whole package.  I think it works well and is elegant (as much as a splint can be).

I wasn't specifically given the go-ahead to move my hand around, so I guess I'll just keep the splint on and wait until I get the approval. 

Is edema a problem with these sorts of fractures?  Sounds scary.

 

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3 hours ago, litewave said:

I've looked at those several times. I think @WARPed1701D bought the G-form version, but don't recall. I'm still evaluating all the options, thanks.

Correct! I have the shirt and have been very happy with it so far. I looked at the  TLD vest and the coverage looks awesome but I live in Florida and I would simply burn up wearing that. As such I didn't investigate the protective properties of the foam it uses. I've been very happy with the G Form shirt and the customer service at G Form (ordered direct from them). Protection seems to be where I need it without being excessive. The spandex breathes well even under my work shirt. My only complaint is no integrated back protection. I ended up getting a POC Spine 2.0 to supplement the shirt to provide full motorcycle rated spine and back protection.

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7 minutes ago, WARPed1701D said:

Correct! I have the shirt and have been very happy with it so far. I looked at the  TLD vest and the coverage looks awesome but I live in Florida and I would simply burn up wearing that. As such I didn't investigate the protective properties of the foam it uses. I've been very happy with the G Form shirt and the customer service at G Form (ordered direct from them). Protection seems to be where I need it without being excessive. The spandex breathes well even under my work shirt. My only complaint is no integrated back protection. I ended up getting a POC Spine 2.0 to supplement the shirt to provide full motorcycle rated spine and back protection.

Yeah, I would probably go for something similar living in Florida climate. My MC-jacket will probably feel very good with autumn coming up, but I will need an alternative come next summer.

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1 hour ago, Chris Westland said:

Boa makes the dial-lacing system (https://www.theboasystem.com/).

Thanks for the info! I use Ossur knee braces  regularly but was not aware some models incorporate this dial lace technology. There is a plethora of knee braces designed for every condition under the sun.

1 hour ago, Chris Westland said:

Is edema a problem with these sorts of fractures?  Sounds scary.

 No!

 I'm sure you experienced swelling (edema) shortly after the break. When a tradtional cast is applied and the swelling subsides the cast becomes loose fitting. Your high tech wrist immobilizer allows you to dial in and maintain adequate compression/ immobilization around the fx site.

Edited by Rehab1

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16 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

Thanks for the info! I use Ossur knee braces  regularly but was not aware some models incorporate this dial lace technology. There is a plethora of knee braces designed for every condition under the sun. 

Sure.  I guess my splint is pretty unusual, as what I have is a sample that the doctor had from 3M ... they don't normally use these (and the practice is pretty big ... Illinois Bone and Joint http://www.ibji.com/)

19 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

No!

 I'm sure you experienced swelling (edema) shortly after the break. When a tradtional cast is applied and the swelling subsides the cast becomes loose fitting. Your high tech wrist immobilizer allows you to dial in and maintain adequate compression/ immobilization around the fx site.

I guess I was thinking of high altitude edema (I'm not use to the terms).  So edema is just swelling.  Great to hear!  Thanks!

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9 hours ago, WARPed1701D said:

Correct! I have the shirt and have been very happy with it so far. I looked at the  TLD vest and the coverage looks awesome but I live in Florida and I would simply burn up wearing that. As such I didn't investigate the protective properties of the foam it uses. I've been very happy with the G Form shirt and the customer service at G Form (ordered direct from them). Protection seems to be where I need it without being excessive. The spandex breathes well even under my work shirt. My only complaint is no integrated back protection. I ended up getting a POC Spine 2.0 to supplement the shirt to provide full motorcycle rated spine and back protection.

I just ordered shirt, pants, knee and elbow protection, for trail riding.

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16 hours ago, ir_fuel said:

I just ordered shirt, pants, knee and elbow protection, for trail riding.

I think you will be really pleased with the gear. I am. Comfortable, discrete, and considering the protection offered surprisingly cool. I had to order multiple sizes to get the right fit, especially for the knees and elbow pads sure to the two measurements required above and below the joint (which put me in two different sizes) but G Form customer service was great for returns.

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On 2017-8-27 at 3:26 AM, Scatcat said:

Oh, it's comfortable enough, and if you hit the ground a road rash may be painful, but broken bones in your hands or wrists may take you out of circulation for months.

Rather break my hands than my head

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On 8/26/2017 at 1:40 PM, dalewalker said:

I have to disagree on this one. When you put your hands out to stop your fall you dont want them to slide

The theory behind skid plates is to redirect the force from a direct impact into the bone to a rather gentler slide and associated dissipation of force to eliminate or reduce injury.  They do extensive testing of that theory with regard to motorcycle racing gear and skid plates are often placed at elbow, shoulder, knee and palm locations.

Keep the plates on for maximum crash survivability.

 

 

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If you fall hard enough and your hands slide your probably gona smash your head into the ground.

A triangle is the strongest  shape and when you fall you initially put your hands out on front to break your fall making a triangle between your body, your arms and the road, this keeps your head elevated while your landing.

This triangle relys on friction.

Without the friction this triangle is weak and can collapse resulting in an actual "face plant".

 

Thats my view on it 

Hope it makes sense lol

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1 hour ago, dalewalker said:

If you fall hard enough and your hands slide your probably gona smash your head into the ground.

A triangle is the strongest  shape and when you fall you initially put your hands out on front to break your fall making a triangle between your body, your arms and the road, this keeps your head elevated while your landing.

This triangle relys on friction.

Without the friction this triangle is weak and can collapse resulting in an actual "face plant".

 

Thats my view on it 

Hope it makes sense lol

Oh you make sense alright, it's just that I don't think that is what would happen.

Falling forward, making the triangle with hands and elbows, you'll skid on your knee-pads and skid-plates. That momentum should take some of the force out of the fall, actually lessening the risk of a blunt face-plant. There should be enough friction anyway to keep your triangle intact, it's not ice, but plastic on ground, and that plastic will get very scratched.

But of course you may be right, I just don't think you are.

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2 minutes ago, Pard said:

+1

That is exactly why the skid plates work and should not be removed.  Any typical wrist protector has a plastic or similar splint/plate at the base of the hand to promote a slide and dissipate energy.

 

These guys often walk away from 100mph slides with little injury BECAUSE they are wearing gear that promotes a slide to dissipate energy rather than an abrupt stop which would destroy bones and kill.

 

 

Those guys make it look fun to crash :D

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11 hours ago, Pard said:

+1

That is exactly why the skid plates work and should not be removed.  Any typical wrist protector has a plastic or similar splint/plate at the base of the hand to promote a slide and dissipate energy.

 

These guys often walk away from 100mph slides with little injury BECAUSE they are wearing gear that promotes a slide to dissipate energy rather than an abrupt stop which would destroy bones and kill.

 

 

Not the same. Your not going down in those crashes and are moving alot faster. You want to slide when coming off a motorcycle. 

My point was when falling DOWN you put your limbs out to stop your head hitting the ground and without enough friction its going to come down to strength alone to overcome the force caused by your momentum.

Yeah its all good if you can hold your head up while sliding but if your going down and your hands slide and you don't have the strength in your arms to hold it your hands are just going to slide out the way so your head gets a nice clean smack on the ground.

 

Then there is the other issue where some peoples fingers roll under the slide plates and become the slide plates taring the shit outa there fingers.

I think the best way to protect your hands is wirh some leather riding gloves because all you need to do is stop abrasions

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8 hours ago, dalewalker said:

Not the same. Your not going down in those crashes and are moving alot faster. You want to slide when coming off a motorcycle. 

My point was when falling DOWN you put your limbs out to stop your head hitting the ground and without enough friction its going to come down to strength alone to overcome the force caused by your momentum.

Yeah its all good if you can hold your head up while sliding but if your going down and your hands slide and you don't have the strength in your arms to hold it your hands are just going to slide out the way so your head gets a nice clean smack on the ground.

 

Then there is the other issue where some peoples fingers roll under the slide plates and become the slide plates taring the shit outa there fingers.

I think the best way to protect your hands is wirh some leather riding gloves because all you need to do is stop abrasions

True, the fall from an EUC is not identical to a motorcycle low side crash.

The science behind the benefits of sliding upon impact can be explained.

If you just wear a pair of tough leather gloves, upon impact with the ground at speed, the material will "grab" the surface and transmit tremendous breaking/deceleration force into your hands and arms.

If the impact is between the ground and a slippery material such as smooth plastic, that force is deflected from direct transmission through the hand and arm.  True, you lose grip and postural stability, but in the case of preventing injury from the fall, that postural instability is desirable. Yes, you may hit your chin, which is why a full face helmet makes the most sense for EUC riding.

If you fall onto outstretched arms at EUC speed, and do not slide easily upon impact, you will break something.

Abrasion resistance must be supplemented by impact force deflection.

In the case of motorcycle gear and crashes, you see the benefit clearly.  Experience and research has reduced once life threatening crashes to non-events.  The forces of a body in motion and in contact with the ground at speed are gradually dissipated through harmless sliding.  Tumbling is still a problem, and that is when airbags in the suits do their jobs stabilizing joints.

In the bad old days, impact with the ground caused rapid deceleration due to poor sliding characteristics, resulting in massive harmful forces directly into the skeleton and organs.

I am not an independent researcher or expert, but I absolutely understand the logic and respect the experience and expertise of those who research and develop protective gear for uncaged motor sports.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Pard

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The entire point of sliding is slowly dissipating kinetic energy. The more energy that gets lost in movement, the less there is left to harm your body. That's why it's usually the most spectacular crashes that cause the least damage, because you "see" the energy, and you can break your bones with what looks like a stupid fall.

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7 hours ago, EUC Extreme said:

 

Falling on my shelter is actually almost fun.
But the right kind of crash should still be kept in mind.
Without the shields, the right technology saves you from major injuries.
Here's one exemplary crash of really hard speed.

Recently, I have not made videos since, EUCs are so bad and slow.
Driving has been less. It does not interest me because the devices do not let me run as I would like.
New fast-moving devices have been underway, but their manufacture has been tampered with.
So I did not want just a little better device.
I want to be fair at once.
Mainly I've been practicing on difficult terrain. But it's not as spectacular as driving fast.
But I think I can get a satisfactory device and I can again enjoy the challenges.

 

 

What kind of protective gear are you wearing?

What type of gloves are those?

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8 hours ago, dalewalker said:

Here is a good video i found showing how to fall. 

Judo and gymnastics are also great for learning how to fall

Very nice ... useful information, and I think so much better if you are wearing protection...

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1 hour ago, Pard said:

True, the fall from an EUC is not identical to a motorcycle low side crash.

The science behind the benefits of sliding upon impact can be explained.

If you just wear a pair of tough leather gloves, upon impact with the ground at speed, the material will "grab" the surface and transmit tremendous breaking/deceleration force into your hands and arms.

If the impact is between the ground and a slippery material such as smooth plastic, that force is deflected from direct transmission through the hand and arm.  True, you lose grip and postural stability, but in the case of preventing injury from the fall, that postural instability is desirable. Yes, you may hit your chin, which is why a full face helmet makes the most sense for EUC riding.

If you fall onto outstretched arms at EUC speed, and do not slide easily upon impact, you will break something.

Abrasion resistance must be supplemented by impact force deflection.

In the case of motorcycle gear and crashes, you see the benefit clearly.  Experience and research has reduced once life threatening crashes to non-events.  The forces of a body in motion and in contact with the ground at speed are gradually dissipated through harmless sliding.  Tumbling is still a problem, and that is when airbags in the suits do their jobs stabilizing joints.

In the bad old days, impact with the ground caused rapid deceleration due to poor sliding characteristics, resulting in massive harmful forces directly into the skeleton and organs.

I am not an independent researcher or expert, but I absolutely understand the logic and respect the experience and expertise of those who research and develop protective gear for uncaged motor sports.

 

 

 

 

I tend to agree, though falling off a motorcycle at 100mph+ (common in races) is dangerous, and I have witnessed crashes that have resulted in permanent brain damage and death.  Even at lower speeds, e.g., 40mph, you skid a long way, and it is likely that there will be something along the way to bring you to a sudden halt, even on a racetrack.  On the street, it is certain. 

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