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Autopsy of the New Gotway Bullet Connectors


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Here is a photo and video of the new Gotway motor bullet connectors. 

The outer sheath is a rigid type plastic almost molded in design. This protective sheath is not your standard shrink wrap. I am not sure how the sheath is assembled over the bullet connector as I heated the plastic and it remained consistent to form. Possibly there was no longer any shrink value remaining.

As @Jason McNeil stated the bullet connectors are crimped but interestedly they are soldered as well. Depicted in the photo and video you can see both the male and female connectors GW now uses along with the thick protective sheath.  

I would love to know the assembly process on how GW integrates the wires into the connectors when they are crimped, soldered and the sheath applied. It is probably proprietary so we may never know.

 

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22 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

Here is a photo and video of the new Gotway motor bullet connectors. 

The outer sheath is a rigid type plastic almost molded in design. This protective sheath is not your standard shrink wrap. I am not sure how the sheath is assembled over the bullet connector as I heated the plastic and it remained consistent to form. Possibly there was no longer any shrink value remaining.

As @Jason McNeil stated the bullet connectors are crimped but interestedly they are soldered as well. Depicted in the photo and video you can see both the male and female connectors GW now uses along with the thick protective sheath.  

I would love to know the assembly process on how GW integrates the wires into the connectors when they are crimped, soldered and the sheath applied. It is probably proprietary so we may never know.

 

This was posted on the Gotway Facebook page on March 9th. I think it'll answer all of your questions.

 

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7 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

This was posted on the Gotway Facebook page on March 9th. I think it'll answer all of your questions.

Thank you! I can sleep tonight!!:clap3:

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10 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

This was posted on the Gotway Facebook page on March 9th. I think it'll answer all of your questions.

Nice find, looks extremely thorough, especially when contrasted with the guillotined connectors from the opening sequence! 

I guess this is GW's terminology of 'cold press' process. @Rehab1 has compiled enough material to write his next book, titled,'101 Things You Ever Wanted to Know About GW Connectors but Were Afraid to Ask". 

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I feel I should send my Gotway  to Rehab along with a check, and have him work it over and be done with once and for all.

Presently I feel like an involuntary suicide bomber, having woke up drunk and not knowing the day, but armed with the certain knowledge my wheel will explode "eventually".

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30 minutes ago, Jason McNeil said:

Nice find, looks extremely thorough, especially when contrasted with the guillotined connectors from the opening sequence! 

I guess this is GW's terminology of 'cold press' process. @Rehab1 has compiled enough material to write his next book, titled,'101 Things You Ever Wanted to Know About GW Connectors but Were Afraid to Ask". 

 

 Or:

" Things you wanted to know about GOTWAY and freaked out when you found out."  LOL.

 Soldering then crimping: the crimp is against a soft meltable material and not fused to the wires. If overheating is an issue the tin could melt. Would it be enough to allow the wire to be able slide out? Dont know.

Striping. OH MY GOD! what is wrong with these people! 

Soldering crimping and then soldering again. This would allow even more tin to flow up the cable causing a stress point whee the wicking stops. This causes a stiff wire absorbing riding shock and vibrations.  Not a good idea. You want to retain the flexibility of the wire on its entirety.

I do not understand why people make up new processes to well understood methods to cabling process studied by the military and NASA. The point of crimping is to put enough pressure so that the wires and crimp pin actually conform and fuse when done correctly. Soldering makes no sense unless you are crimping wrong. Nothing wrong with soldering but it need to be done with understanding of cold solder and wicking tin up the cable 

All this information is available for free in the internet all the way back to the 1950's. But what do I know?

Ref-Crimp-vs-Solder.pdf

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NASA requirements. Maybe there are not so good at  copying information after all. @Rehab1 

@Marty Backe @Jason McNeil @everyone

Read this document and share. I tried to attach PDF but its too big. 

4.3.4 Crimping. Stranded wire shall be used for crimping (Requirement). Crimping of solid wire is prohibited. Crimping of solder tinned wire is prohibited.

https://nepp.nasa.gov/files/27631/NSTD87394A.pdf

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiJrPi1_pfUAhUhxoMKHdQOD2YQFggmMAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fnepp.nasa.gov%2Ffiles%2F27631%2FNSTD87394A.pdf&usg=AFQjCNG77rGVfCIqNROG9dkAFLgOBycNNA&sig2=V1rm-pC1zwG8zaW1LKNNpw

 

NASA-STD-8739-4.pdf

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3 minutes ago, Carlos E Rodriguez said:

It's standards such as this which allow NASA to launch the Shuttle for the very first time, with a crew aboard. It's also why military hardware, etc. costs $$$

We tend to think software is crappy because of all the poor software we see on our devices. But you would be impressed by the quality (and time to develop) software used in aircraft, military hardware, etc.

Humans know how to do this now. It's not a mystery. But it takes dedication, time, and $$$. Those qualities are generally not compatible with consumers.

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1 minute ago, Marty Backe said:

It's standards such as this which allow NASA to launch the Shuttle for the very first time, with a crew aboard. It's also why military hardware, etc. costs $$$

We tend to think software is crappy because of all the poor software we see on our devices. But you would be impressed by the quality (and time to develop) software used in aircraft, military hardware, etc.

Humans know how to do this now. It's not a mystery. But it takes dedication, time, and $$$. Those qualities are generally not compatible with consumers.

I totally agree. But proper soldering and proper crimping is just a choice. And we have studied the crap out of it. They just need to be competent about it and use the excisting knowledge. No need to be creative here!

Think about this. Had they used a trained engineer and applied the industry standards, you would have never heard of a melted connector or overheated connector or melted solder. They are showing how deficient they are in just following good Manufacturing Practices and those are available for free. Its just not acceptable to pay all these money and have it put together poorly. They are just play ignorant and destroying their brand and spending more money. Meaks no sense.

 

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5 hours ago, Carlos E Rodriguez said:

Think about this. Had they used a trained engineer and applied the industry standards, you would have never heard of a melted connector or overheated connector or melted solder. They are showing how deficient they are in just following good Manufacturing Practices and those are available for free. Its just not acceptable to pay all these money and have it put together poorly. They are just play ignorant and destroying their brand and spending more money. Meaks no sense.

 

That's just the point if they had the funds I am sure they would have hired the best of the best to train the workers. 

Take South Korean made cars 10 years ago they were shit as but as the market grew more money was invested into them and look where they are now.

Yes the people who buy them now aren't getting the best $$$ value but we are pathing the way to a better product if gotway survives I am certain the quality will improve over time.

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9 hours ago, LanghamP said:

I feel I should send my Gotway  to Rehab along with a check, and have him work it over and be done with once and for all.

 

You may not get your wheel back as I really like having spare parts!:)

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8 hours ago, Rehab1 said:

Edit: So GW's method would have been fine if the solder was applied after the crimp!

During the installation of my bullet connectors I purposely did not tin the wires. The bullets were first filled with solder and then the stranded wires were placed inside the concavity so the solder flowed evenly around the wires.

Ugh! I'm a big fan of NASA but not sure I would advocate this type connection that is depicted in your document!  ;)

 

In general if you think NASA is wrong I would pause and read it more carefully because it is very unlikely you are not right. All these procedures have been scrutinized by many hundreds of people smarter than us. 

And the design has to meet the application. I am sure it is not for carrying hundreds of watts or in vibration prone environments. They are showing how to do all types of connections. Also all the connection methods have to be tested when implemented for the first time to certify use. For example a 14 gauge has to be able to sustain a 50 lbs pull test.  

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