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Transportation (vs. recreational) role for EUCs?


MaxLinux

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I thought this NY Times article was very interesting because of its repeated references to the "first/last mile." EUCs are very suitable for this role. I thought of Tishawn Fahie as an example I became aware of via this forum. I think there is potential for EUCs to become increasingly important in a serious utilitarian role in addition to being used for fun. I ride my EUC mostly for recreation, but I do use it as actual transportation for all of my grocery shopping. I also dusted off my 14-inch TG wheels for the short hop from my apartment to my office and for getting around the campus of the university where I work.

Automakers Prepare for an America That’s Over the Whole Car Thing

Many younger Americans do not consider owning a car a goal or necessity -- or a necessary expense. So carmakers are looking ahead to a day when the automobile plays a smaller role, or even no role at all, in many people’s daily routines.

http://nyti.ms/2ijivwP

 

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In 2003-2006 I worked with 'Kim' in Boston

http://www.elynsgroup.com/journal/women-heal-int/ebm/Kim

I was told he rode his bicycle (in good weather) from the Orient Heights area north of Boston to his lab at the old Navy building. One of his daughters graduated from UMass Amherst where I went in the 1970's. After leaving Boston for Georgia his last email from years ago said that the summer temperature in Georgia was much greater than he was used to but that he was adjusting to the change. 

I tend to think that, sweating considerations aside, the bicycle has a better fit than the euc. Racks of 'for short term rent' by credit card kiosk bicycles can be found at certain places in Boston like South Station and Copley Sq.

The EUC at some thirtyish pounds is a bit of a heavy lug in addition to the various challenges met while riding near traffic and people.

I just went out into the thirtyish degree temps on my EUC. The 6 mile ride depleted 10 battery capacity miles . The app for the EUC calculates a somewhat better battery performance for my weight, air temperature and battery charge-cycling# than that value but I use a rule of thumb expectation of 2x the actual miles when predicting battery depletion charge.

I tend to think the EUC is better for recreation. Short distance rides as dependable transportation are competitive cost wise with buses but the EUC-traffic fit can be challenging on anything other than smooth sidewalk or bike paths.

'Real people' ride the bus, drive their registered and licensed cars/motorbikes /mopeds or unregistered bicycles. The EUC is a novelty to which most people are unsure how to interact with in a moving  vehicle context.

Once purchased and proficient the rider of the EUC gets a relatively costless and effortless (one person only) vehicle to operate on his/her chosen path

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On 12/25/2016 at 7:07 PM, Bob Eisenman said:

I tend to think the EUC is better for recreation.

Me, too, it's fun to ride on bike paths, but it would not be practical to ride to work or even the store, where I live.  It is probably good for inner city commutes though.

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55 minutes ago, steve454 said:

Me, too, it's fun to ride on bike paths, but it would not be practical to ride to work or even the store, where I live.  It is probably good for inner city commutes though.

Ah, but it all depends on your situation...

I live in an area where it is ~23°C (74°F) in summer and ~4°C (40°F) in winter. 

I commute as much as possible (year 'round) by EUC, which means either a 5km ride to the office, or 1.5 km to the train station and another 1/2km at the other end (depending which office I work from. 

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I'm about a mile from the bus station - I take a bus into the city each day.  With the EUC, I make it to the bus line in 10 minutes - exactly the same as it takes me to drive.  Driving, I have to find a parking spot in the garage, with the EUC, it's so cool to ride right up onto the platform, stopping at the end of the line of people.  Then, when I get into town, I can zip down the sidewalk (carefully dodging pedestrians).  Easier than loading a bicycle up onto the front of the bus as well.

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Great thread, awesome to hear from other daily commuters.

Rather than use my EUC for the "last mile," I ride about 12 miles total each day to and from work here in San Francisco. Takes between 25 and 30 minutes, depending on pace and traffic. The same commute in a car takes at least that long, often longer, factoring in parking, which could cost me up to $7/day. (And that's a bargain in San Francisco, where daily parking downtown can exceed $50 or more.)

Weather here is rarely a concern, and it never freezes or snows, for which I am eternally grateful. I ride in bike lanes (20 percent) or (shared) traffic lanes (80 percent) for my daily ride. Our bike infrastructure in San Francisco could be better, but is a vast improvement from years past. 

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6 hours ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

Ah, but it all depends on your situation...

I live in an area where it is ~23°C (74°F) in summer and ~4°C (40°F) in winter. 

Bragger! :) I would love those temperatures in my area year around! Unfortunately our winter weather along with the lack of adequate bike/ pedestrian paths would not support EUC daily commutes! Bummer!

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I use EUC (currently V8) for a daily commute all year long independent of the weather (rain, wind, cold even snow). Just today I was "blessed" by strong headwind of 55 - 65 Km/h leaving me at time almost standing still. Daily round trip is 20 Km clocking 100 Km a week just for commuting on the wheel plus whatever leisure or additional trips I'll have. It's using 100% dedicated bicycle lanes, most of them in perfect condition with short train trip in the middle. Prior using the EUC I was using bicycle to get to / from train at "home" side and metro to got to / from train at "work" side. Despite both being fairly reliable and fast I still find the EUC more convenient (that's even with the need to carry it on to train) and faster as it removes the both hassle of the picking up the bike every morning from the storage at home and returning it there at the evening (although it's also possible to simply keep it locked in front of the house but I was reluctant doing that both due to the weather and cost of the bike) as well as placing and locking it at bicycle park at train station - I'll simply roll all the way to the lift at train station instead which takes me directly down to platform. It also avoids crowds of people at metro during peak hours and as a benefit on the return trip I can actually get off the train one stop earlier (as the train waits there for a bit) and get home much faster or go to nearby shopping areas and so on. In general while there is no direct cost saving for my commute as I can't avoid the train trip the overall comfort and flexibility is higher and I also feel much less stressed out than before. Same goes for the shopping trips where the need to either push the EUC around by the trolley handle or placing it in the shopping cart still outweighs the hassle of "parking" and locking the bicycle (and that's in very bicycle friendly countries). As long as you're aware of your range and watch your battery level (or carry portable charger or have and alternative way of transportation - in my case I can always hop on the bus or metro with no extra charge as my commuter pass covers both train and local transport) I find EUC to be an improvement comparing to bicycle or public transport - that's indeed for locations already bicycle friendly though sometimes too many bicycles might be a bit of problem / disadvantage for EUC riders.

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