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Planetpapi

Ninebot One S1 for $599 on Amazon.

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1 hour ago, Planetpapi said:

This article below mentioned that Segway wants to sell One S1 into the brick and mortar stores all over North America.

http://newatlas.com/segway-one-s1-ces/46916/

Just sharing.

Great link, I noticed that there is going to be a black one next year 1st quarter.  That article shows that advertising is slowly ramping up for the ninebot, it seems they are moving slowly but surely in to the mainstream.

I wonder if the E+ is next to be introduced to the media, and whether it will be improved.  The last firmware update was Dec 2015 I think, a full year ago.  I am not holding my breath though, I predict a whole new 16 inch wheel to take it's place within a year.

Today while riding in the park, some kids asked what is that, where did you get it?  I replied, it's a Ninebot, got it at a Segway store.:o

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I think you are right about getting exposure slowly, without alarming the politicians.  Frys electronics carries the Minipro now, but no EUC yet.

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I just hope it won't follow the hover board fiasco last year, not with exploding batteries but bunch of fools falling down and suing sellers. It would be very interesting to see how main stream users will adopt it or not. 

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I doubt it will, they cost a lot more and are not really aimed at kids.  Not this year anyway, maybe by next year the public will be more aware of them.

 

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I bought a S1 to test out if it was any good. It has some nice design aspects, like the handle, but in in almost every important technical respect it's inferior to the V5F series. 

There's an annoyingly safety instructional guide in the App. Each screen has an obligatory 3 second countdown timer & the speed is limited to 10kph for the first 1km. The Wheel's handling feels like it's been programmed by a Health & Safety committee, extremely conservative. 

Any S1 owners on the forum?

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22 minutes ago, Jason McNeil said:

I bought a S1 to test out if it was any good. 

The Wheel's handling feels like it's been programmed by a Health & Safety committee, extremely conservative. 

 

Sounds like the S1 would be a good 1st prize for 'The EUC Worst Video Talent Contest'!:laughbounce2:

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25 minutes ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

Finally a contest that I could win!  :w00t2:

No..that would be 'The Most Academically Revered EUC Talent Contest'! :smartass::laughbounce2:

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6 hours ago, Jason McNeil said:

There's an annoyingly safety instructional guide in the App. Each screen has an obligatory 3 second countdown timer & the speed is limited to 10kph for the first 1km. The Wheel's handling feels like it's been programmed by a Health & Safety committee, extremely conservative. 

Any S1 owners on the forum?

Do you mean it's too 'safe'? :P

I only tried One S2 and I do find it beeps a lot.

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12 hours ago, cloudust said:

Do you mean it's too 'safe'? :P

I only tried One S2 and I do find it beeps a lot.

It can't beep more than the X8 does.  There's no way.  ;)

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@Jason McNeil your initial experiences of the S1 sound exactly like my unboxing and initial setup for my former S2.

Speaking of beeps, if the S1 proves the same as the S2 in terms of non-adjustable beep volume, you might want to add that to the chart. This IMO is huge, as the Ninebot One S2 was obnoxiously loud with the beeping.

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4 minutes ago, houseofjob said:

Speaking of beeps, if the S1 proves the same as the S2 in terms of non-adjustable beep volume, you might want to add that to the chart. This IMO is huge, as the Ninebot One S2 was obnoxiously loud with the beeping.

Very true! Adding to the list...

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On 16/12/2016 at 10:46 PM, Jason McNeil said:

More battery cells = better. Although both Wheels have the same capacity, the Inmotion V5F uses more 10 more battery cells.

Can you explain quickly why more cells are better?

BTW, a comparison of the weight is missing.

Edited by Mono

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1 hour ago, Mono said:

Can you explain quickly why more cells are better?

DC motors are powered by voltage; the more voltage, the more quickly the hub motor can spin, so they can correct for a sudden burst better (i.e. compensate for an overlean or a bump in the road).

The more cells a battery has, the more voltage is immediately available to be pulled, so it can handle a bigger draw for those spikes in energy usage by the motor.  This is reflected in the "system voltage" column.

 

To add to Jason's post, I haven't had an S1/S2, but I do have a Ninebot One E+ and a V5F+, and I have found the V5F+ to be better on every single metric.  I personally don't care about the LED's, and the V5F+ is just a much better engineered machine.

Edited by codersarepeople

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8 hours ago, Mono said:

Can you explain quickly why more cells are better?

The higher voltage (20s2p vs 15s2p) is advantegous for a higher speed reserve.

but we don't know the motor characteriatics (back emf per rpm) - this number could relativise the advantage, also the v5 has a higher max speed, so by this it uses up some of this reserve. But so at the same speed the inmotion could have the chance to deliver more current ==torque==acceleration==safety.

but both have the 2p configuration, so they could be comparable in regard of delivering peak currents?

Imho the second main factor for delivering sudden current bursts for bumps, etc is the ability of the choosen cell to deliver high currents. There are big differences for the available cells and not always the best choices were taken from the factory ( Imho decision was often based on capacity and not on high current delivering capability)

So while using the battery configuration for the higher voltage could be an advandage, for any further 'speculation' one would need to compare the used battery cells datasheet/high current vehaviour.

 

 

 

 

 

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@Jason McNeil could have said higher system voltage 84.2 vs 59.2, as listed, is an advantage, but he wrote the larger number of cells is an advantage. So I figured the reason should be something which has not to do with voltage.

Edited by Mono

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8 minutes ago, Panotaker said:

I bought one of the new Segway One S1 from Amazon a few days ago. First let me say that I have years of experience on a regular unicycle. I regularly mountain bike on a Kris Holm KH24 24" mountain unicycle, (it's called MUNI) and have rode a 10 foot giraffe unicycle. I first learned how to ride a unicycle when I was 12 years old, and I am 60 years old now, so I have been at it a while. I also own a regular 2 wheel Segway, so that experience probably helped too. The S1 is my first electric unicycle, and it was a piece of cake for me to learn how to ride it. I literally rode it on my first try. I was a little wobbly the first couple of tries, but after a couple of minutes, I rode it around the block with no problems. After that, I was able to turn off the speed limiter, and was able to ride it at full speed. I still had to flip thru all the pages of the tutorial though. It's been cold here, so I have only rode it for around 5 miles, but I have pretty good control of it, but I am not ready to ride it on a crowded sidewalk just yet, but I should be after a few more miles. 

....

Very inspiring story!  Just my observations, but 2 weeks sounds like what it takes a lot of people to get up and going on an EUC without prior experience, although younger people seems to do it in less than 1/4 of that time and there appears to be a wide variation.  I do get the idea though that it is easier than a unicycle.  I'm just about to try to learn to ride over Christmas.  I have the Segway MiniPro which I really like, but find it's speed limit too restrictive.  It was very easy to learn.

Welcome to the forum, you have some great experience and passion for unicycles so I'm looking forward to your future posts. 

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Well good luck trying to learn in the winter time. I hate the cold! I know it sounds like a good idea to try to learn inside the house, but unless you have a super long hallway, there really is no room, plus you take a big chance of breaking furniture, or making a hole in the sheetrock. I suggest a tennis court. Some tennis courts are coated with a rubber coating, (like the play grounds at McDonalds) and they won't scratch your EUC as much when you fall.

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56 minutes ago, Panotaker said:

I am curious to know if anybody that rides an electric unicycle, has ever tried to learn how to ride a regular unicycle. I was wondering if it was easier to learn how to ride it faster, than somebody that has never been on any type of unicycle. Normally, it takes about 2 weeks for an average person to learn how to ride a regular unicycle, if you practice around 30 minutes a day.

It seems obvious that it is harder to learn a unicycle than an EUC, as riding the former requires a superset of skills of riding the latter. I have let other unicyclists ride the EUC and all of them were up and running within a minute or so, though I didn't hear them saying the peace-of-cake thing. I am convinced I will be now much faster in learning to ride unicycles, maybe I could do it in a few days, but certainly not in a minute.

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To learn to ride a regular unicycle, the best tip I can give you is, put a block of wood behind the tire so that the unicycle doesn't roll backwards. Or go to an empty parking lot and use one of those parking curbs to put behind the tire. Start with the pedals horizontal with more pressure on the back pedal, that way it doesn't roll backwards, and the only way you can go is forwards. Draw a line on the ground about 3 feet in front of you. The first goal is to cross that line. After that, draw a line 6 feet in front of you and try to cross that. Eventually, something will click in your brain, and you will be able to ride it around 15 to 20 feet. After that, you will pick it up pretty quickly. To take turns, it is easier to learn on narrow bike trails than in open parking lots. In open parking lots, you tend to not want to turn and just go straight. In narrow trails, you have to turn to follow the trail, and your brain will force you to turn automatically to stay on the trail. Good luck.

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