Jump to content
Scully

Puncture on MSuper V3

Recommended Posts

Anyone had a chance to fix a puncture on an Msuper V3? 
I've already pulled the tyre over and patched it - but a few weeks later it's flat again, I have a new inner tube on order. 

I've taken the covers off.... could do with some pointers from here... The big bolt in the middle is screaming to be undone - just thought i'd check here first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that needs to come off as well. If you search youtube I remember at least two videos of people taking these units apart. Whether it was for a tire change I'm not sure but I would check with that first. Also didnot you but from speedyfeetuk. he can probably help you out as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's OK, I figured it out. 

The motherboard side, there are about 8 screws around the outer casing. 

The other side, you have to take the side panel off and then the smaller bolts around the big nut. 

Also you have to dismantle the trolley handle - from the handle end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Scully said:

It's OK, I figured it out. 

The motherboard side, there are about 8 screws around the outer casing. 

The other side, you have to take the side panel off and then the smaller bolts around the big nut. 

Also you have to dismantle the trolley handle - from the handle end.

awesome. If I ever get a flat i will be messaging you directly for help. Maybe you can do a video for the forum.. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done a whoopsey though. 

I disconnected my battery - I thought it was good practice when working on these things. 
I just tried to re-connect it, the 1st side (motherboard) went back fine - then 2nd side, big spark, now the XT60's are fried, 

I dis-connected the mother board side, dis-connected that battery then tried to re-connect the 'fried' side.  
The XT60's won't physically go back together. 

I have no idea what to do now....
Oops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slime not only prevents flats but repairs them too. Just the other week @jrkline got a flat on his ACM (before he had a chance to add Slime). He fixed the flat by putting Slime in the tire and has ridden a lot since with no further problems.

I filled all my tires with Slime and hope to never need to replace a tube even if I get a flat. Knock on wood...

Edited by Marty Backe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know mate. 
Stuck it on the charger this morning, then went to a local auto electrician for his advice. 

He fitted a new block connector - all went together without any problems. 


Here is the video showing how to change the inner tube. 
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

To Change a tyre doing a complete Shell disassembly???

What about this way:

- 1. Take both pedals and sidepads off

- 2. Unscrew on both sides all the screws which connect the pedal arms to the Shell (and the board on one side) 

- 3. Unplug the Motor cables from the board

- 4. Now the tyre/wheel including pedal arms are in no way  connected to the Shell! Just drop the wheel out (carfully)  underneath the (still nearly complete assembled ) Shell. While doing this just take care of the Motor cables going through the Shell hole in the middle.

5. Ready to repair the tyre

Like this you can do at least tyre repairs on wheels like the KS14 and KS16...

There is no Need to unscrew the Shell in 2 halfs or mess up with the Batterie, electronics and trolley.

I think this works on the V3 also,?!

i hope that i explained good enough what i mean..otherwise you could look here from Minute 0:45 and you get the idea :

 

Edited by KingSong69

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check with @zlymex. He recently changed the tire by opening the side cover on one of the sides and didnt have to disconnect the motor from the board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, no need to touch battery / motor / board. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Scully said:

I don't know mate. 
Stuck it on the charger this morning, then went to a local auto electrician for his advice. 

He fitted a new block connector - all went together without any problems. 


Here is the video showing how to change the inner tube. 
 

 

THAT WAS AWESOME YOU DID THAT FOR US!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't have to replace a tube because it got punctured! Just patch the dam thing. On most these wheels there is plenty of room to remove just a small portion of the tube (at the affected spot) with out even removing the wheel or even the tire. There is simply no need to remove the tire from the rim to patch a tube. 3 minutes and 50 cents later you're off!

But of the two methods discussed above I would drop the entire wheel by pulling the axle and leaving both side covers and as much of the electrics untouched a possible - But you only need to remove the rim and the tire IF you are replacing the tube.
Repairing the tube, leave all that stuff in place.

Edited by Roll Model

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slime will reduce the efficiency of your rig. It adds to the energy required to accelerate your EUC and it uses additional energy to maintain a given speed...
For many, getting a puncture is one of the worst things they can imagine - But the truth is that it isn't very tough to repair. A hole in your inner tube is not reason to replace the tube.
Thick tubes, thick tires, "Mr. Tuffy" (http://mrtuffy.com/) protection strips, Tire Wipers (https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/fenders/tire-wipers/) and slime are all ways to prevent flats, but all will suck up a portion of the energy you have on tap.
For many, the fear and inconvenience of getting a flat simply out weigh everything else...
If you go the slime route then you will have to consider the huge mess you will have on your hands if you ever wear out or decide to upgrade your tire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Roll Model said:

Slime will reduce the efficiency of your rig. It adds to the energy required to accelerate your EUC and it uses additional energy to maintain a given speed...

How did you figure out that this is the case? And how much energy we are talking about? And how does this quantitatively compare to the additional energy needed by a tire which weighs, say, 120g more than the original tire?

Edited by Mono

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Mono said:

How did you figure out that this is the case? And how much energy we are talking about? And how does this quantitatively compare to the additional energy needed by a tire which weighs, say, 120g more than the original tire?

Lighter wheels, rims and tires et all will increase the performance of your car, your bike, your Euc...There is little to 'figure out' in regard to that, but many experiences with bikes and cars have lern't me. How much loss is unclear and it's magnitude would vary quite a bit during a typical ride. I know there are ZERO bike road racing teams that us it and the same number of Mountain bike teams - If they get a flat it can end the race for them! But if I can feel it in a car when I install a lighter tire (and see the gas mileage go up) and feel it when I had a bike with a weekend set and a racing set of tires/rims (that difference was huge) then I suspect it would come into play here as well.
When you ask a quantitative question the answers become rather meaningless as we are never in a world where we must give 100% effort, 100% of the time unless we are in a race.
Most the time we smell a few roses, avoid bumps and dog poop and we don't wear aerodynamic clothing or use a stop watch every where we go. If the range of your Bot is 30 miles and you increased it by 10% would you notice it in general use? How about on a 12 mile ride? But the 'seat of the pants' feel could change if you are a sporty operator. If you never push your EUC then it couldn't matter, put tractor tires on it and call it a [short] day of ridding.
I generally choose performance when I have a choice. I guess if I had a really bad bout with flats I might change my mind but they get easier to fix the more often you do it ;)
I think the slime obsession stems from fear and ignorance - Of course you can put slime in your car tires as well, but when was the last time you actually had a flat? If you live in a really flat prone area...Your quantitative Equations may vary...
All I am saying is that there is no free lunch, slime protection has a price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Roll Model said:

You don't have to replace a tube because it got punctured! Just patch the dam thing. On most these wheels there is plenty of room to remove just a small portion of the tube (at the affected spot) with out even removing the wheel or even the tire. There is simply no need to remove the tire from the rim to patch a tube. 3 minutes and 50 cents later you're off!

But of the two methods discussed above I would drop the entire wheel by pulling the axle and leaving both side covers and as much of the electrics untouched a possible - But you only need to remove the rim and the tire IF you are replacing the tube.
Repairing the tube, leave all that stuff in place.

 

You obviously haven't actually tried to do it then have you.
For your info, I did pull the tube and patch it - then it went down again 3 weeks later - so this time I decided to replace the tube.  To pull the tyre, hook the tube and then find the hole, patch and put it all back together will take the same amount of time as just replacing it. 

You'll see from my video, there is no need to touch the electrics - that was why I made the video, to make sure nobody makes the same mistakes I made.
I'd love to see detailed instructions of 'pulling the axle and dropping the wheel  - feel free to share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look above - Kingsong has instructions and a vid - That's what I was referencing.
As to your other comments - I just have to laugh, what did the 2nd flat have to do with the first flat? I mean unless you failed to fix the first puncture correctly? I have a tire in my MTB that has over ten different patches on it. None of them leak, none of them increase the vulnerability of the tube to additional punctures...Been rdding that same (ultra light weight) tube for years. So even if you had replaced the tube with a brand new one how would that impact the next thorn or glass or snake bite you got into? This is the fear/superstition/ignorance factor that rares it's head every time flats come up - It is what keeps the slime company in the money!

Use a stick like this one Watch Video you certainly don't have to remove the tire from the rim, the wheel from the EUC or detach any wires or use any wenches, pliers or other tools to simply patch a dam tube, unseat a few inches of bead, pull out 3" - 4" of tube and do your thing - As I said I would never remove a tire and never remove the wheel just to fix a flat. It simply isn't necessary.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Scully said:

To pull the tyre, hook the tube and then find the hole, patch and put it all back together will take the same amount of time as just replacing it. 

LOL, maybe for you - But to replace the tube the rim/wheel/motor must be removed from the EUC...
THEN you'd have to remove half the tire and insert a rather uncooperative new tube, making sure it is 'in correctly' and not wrinkled too much, re-seat the entire opened bead, inflate it and THEN go about reinstalling the tire/tube/rim/motor back into the EUC.
The alternative is to unseat about 10" of tire on one side and pull out a small section of tube and effect a repair, which takes seconds, seconds NOT MINUTES. Pump it it up and GO!!! (3 minutes TOPS)
Replacement takes much, much longer (and you have to have a tube where as a repair kit can fit in your shirt pocket) - What happens when you replace the tube and get a 2nd flat right away? With the patch kit you can carry 3, 5 or even 10 patches so you'll always be protected, always be able to ride home.
Your way takes what, 30 minutes if you bust ass and have a work bench and a tray full of tools?
Patching takes minutes and you can do it any where - But operate as you please, take 45 minutes to do a 180 second task. Don't let me hinder you ;)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Roll Model said:

Patching takes minutes and you can do it any where - But operate as you please, take 45 minutes to do a 180 second task. Don't let me hinder you ;)

 

You said 3 minutes. 
Here is your chance to put your money where your mouth is.  If you can post a video of you completing this task in less than 3 minutes I will donate $50 to a charity of your choice.

FYI - I have done it your way, (I have the scuffed knuckles to prove it) like I said, it went flat again after a few weeks - hence I decided to change the tube. by the time you get the tyre off, pull the tube out ... work the tyre and the tube off the rim, pump air back in (to find the hole), turn the rim to find the hole, let the air back out, find the hole again, patch it back up, put it all back together, re-inflate. 
I have nothing against patches, I will happily use them again, especially if I am out / away from home  - this video is simply to help others who wish to change their inner tube.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Roll Model said:

Patching takes minutes and you can do it any where - But operate as you please, take 45 minutes to do a 180 second task. Don't let me hinder you ;)

When I had my flat, it was near the valve. I can't imagine trying to patch it without removing the tire from the EUC. I'd love to see a video of your technique! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey if you can't you can't.
I can (even if it near the stem).
You still talk of 'getting the tire off'...
You still talk of 'working the tube off the rim'...
And all the other none sense that I am sure lot's of people do.
I don't.
I have a valve cover that allows me to remove the core - So even all that pumping the way you do it...and the un-pumping is simply not the 'best' way.
I won't be making a vid any time soon - You sound very confident and clearly are welded to the what you think is the only way it can go.
I have no interest in you funding anything.
I have patched dozens and dozens of tubes (100's?) that way. I worked in a bike shop, regularly rode over 200 miles a week (for decades), raced MTB's and commuted daily to Hollywood and so I did have an opportunity to develop my skills - LOL
It is a technique I learned in high school when I rode a bike with 'sew-ups' - Which have very thin tubes sewn into the tire. First you peel a small amount of the tire which is glues onto the rim, then remove a few inches of the tape which is glued over the stitches. Then you carefully cut open the stitches to gain access to the tube (about 3"-4")...Pull a little out and patch the tube, insert it back into the tire (adding talcum powder), sew it back up, glue the fabric tape over the stitches and re-glue the tire to the rim (some people used tape, some used rim glue). Inflate to 135psi and make sure it runs true!
Look it up, it was the state of the art racing tire for decades and no one EVER removed the tube from the tire to repair the tube. They were very expensive so repair was the only option.
Normally people rode with a spare tire, but I got so good at repairing them I discovered there was no need to carry a 3rd tire.

The fact that you can't, or can't imagine an alternative does not impress me. I'm ok with that!

jimlangley_sewup1.jpg

Edited by Roll Model

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, dmethvin said:

When I had my flat, it was near the valve. I can't imagine trying to patch it without removing the tire from the EUC. I'd love to see a video of your technique! 

With that attitude I just might put together a few stills or a short vid - You sound like you'd actually like to find an easier way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, only to figure out where the leaks in a tube are, I often need to scrutinise the entire tube while using a water bath or liquid soap to accelerate the process.

Edited by Mono

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...