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E-bike motor / controller tester - usable with EUC?

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I  wonder if anyone has any experience with these cheap E-bike motor and controller testers:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/New-Portable-24V-36V-48V-60V-Electro-Car-E-bike-Brushless-Motor-Tester-24V-to-60V/32492995484.html

It so cheap that I might order one and see if it could be (at least partially) used for EUC diagnostic. Maybe some modification would allow it to be  used fully with higher voltages? @esaj @Chriull or other "resident" tinkerers any ideas?

Edited by HEC
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If 60V is the nominal voltage, it should work straight out-of-box with the 67.2V controllers. For the motor, it probably just feeds power itself, testing something like resistances/inductances and hall-sensors, and then the actual nominal voltage of the motor shouldn't matter. Hard to say much else without seeing any schematic (and even with that, my limited knowledge would result in at least some guess work ;)).

Edited by esaj
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1 hour ago, HEC said:

I  wonder if anyone has any experience with these cheap E-bike motor and controller testers:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/New-Portable-24V-36V-48V-60V-Electro-Car-E-bike-Brushless-Motor-Tester-24V-to-60V/32492995484.html

It so cheap that I might order one and see if it could be (at least partially) used for EUC diagnostic. Maybe some modification would allow it to be  used fully with higher voltages? @esaj @Chriull or other "resident" tinkerers any ideas?

You should be able to test the EUC motors with the Voltages this tester is made for. The higher you choose the voltage, the less current is flowing and the more chances you have that the tester survives the testing.

You have an nice 60V source by just using the normal battery pack not fully charged. Or you take the voltage directly from the BMS between ~14 cells instead of all 16. Or it is, as @esajmentioned anyway working with 67,2V (16*4,2 vs. 16*3,7)

As you see in the photo there are just some integrated drivers without any cooling - you should assume this tester to "burn out" as soon as the slightest load is applied to the wheel while testing. Maybe even startup of a 1500W EUC Motor could be too much for this tester.

HTB18Q5.JVXXXXc4XXXXq6xXFXXXZ.jpg

Since i have never seen an e-bike motor i don't know if there are any major differences to EUC motors. But imho here was quite often stated that EUC manufacturers "reuse" e-bike motors so they fit not perfect (axle design, etc). So you could have good chances that it'll work out.

But imho the most experience regarding this should be with "our" firmware and DIY wheel tinkerers, since they have motors lying around at home and tryed out the different ways to get them up and running. Maybe they can also give you some tipps to get the same "test results" even much easier without this tester?

Edited by Chriull
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4 minutes ago, esaj said:

If 60V is the nominal voltage, it should work straight out-of-box with the 67.2V controllers.

Yes I'm sure it would work fine up to 16S models though I was hoping to be able to use it at 20S (84V) models as well (like IM and GW V3). It seems to be pretty "crude" / simple device using 9V battery so most of the basic motor / hall sensor tests should work independent of the nominal voltage anyway. I guess I'll get one worst case I'll have a nice box with power switch, bunch of LEDs and a bundle of leads :D 

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1 minute ago, HEC said:

Yes I'm sure it would work fine up to 16S models though I was hoping to be able to use it at 20S (84V) models as well (like IM and GW V3). It seems to be pretty "crude" / simple device using 9V battery so most of the basic motor / hall sensor tests should work independent of the nominal voltage anyway. I guess I'll get one worst case I'll have a nice box with power switch, bunch of LEDs and a bundle of leads :D 

You can test every 84V motor with the 16s battery pack - the main difference is just a lower max speed.

Imho somehwere here was posted that the motor for the 84V and 67,2V MSuper V3 are identical anyway?

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4 minutes ago, Chriull said:

But imho the most experience regarding this should be with "our" firmware and DIY wheel tinkerers, since they have motors lying around at home and tryed out the different ways to get them up and running. Maybe they can also give you some tipps to get the same "test results" even much easier without this tester?

Let's poke @MattJ and @electric_vehicle_lover then ... :ph34r:

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Just noticed it is said to measure the speed too, which would mean that the box sits "between" the controller and the motor... Electric motors can give out quite high negative spikes when the coils are "turned off", so I'd expect this to be properly protected... in that case, I'd think it won't matter whether the driving voltage from the controller is 60 or 67.2V, as the spikes can be several hundred volts, if not thousand. But not sure, it might just as well break the tester :P

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3 minutes ago, esaj said:

Just noticed it is said to measure the speed too, which would mean that the box sits "between" the controller and the motor... Electric motors can give out quite high negative spikes when the coils are "turned off", so I'd expect this to be properly protected... in that case, I'd think it won't matter whether the driving voltage from the controller is 60 or 67.2V, as the spikes can be several hundred volts, if not thousand. But not sure, it might just as well break the tester :P

Yeah that's why I thought it might be at least usable to test the motor phases / windings and their correct order, rotation and hall sensors. Rest would be just bonus. Also in regards of the integrated drivers as @Chriull mentioned it should be possible to add some small heatsink I'd guess as long as they're specs-ed to withstand the current / voltage needed ...

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5 minutes ago, HEC said:

Yeah that's why I thought it might be at least usable to test the motor phases / windings and their correct order, rotation and hall sensors. Rest would be just bonus. Also in regards of the integrated drivers as @Chriull mentioned it should be possible to add some small heatsink I'd guess as long as they're specs-ed to withstand the current / voltage needed ...

I don't think the tester tries to actually drive (rotate) the motor itself, if it's powered by small batteries, I doubt they could give anywhere near enough current to get the motor moving. The stall & startup current spike for 18V 775V dc brushed motor (around 45mm diameter) I have is above 10A (some seller stated that blocked motor draws more than 14A, they cannot test it further), and that's with no load other than precision ER-11 chuck and the axle itself... ;)

EDIT: The point being, the drivers in the tester shouldn't get hot, I think it only measures the hall-signals while the actual controller drives the motor to find out the speed.

Edited by esaj
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15 minutes ago, esaj said:

I don't think the tester tries to actually drive (rotate) the motor itself, if it's powered by small batteries, I doubt they could give anywhere near enough current to get the motor moving.

Indeed though question is how much overall voltage it can survive plus what exactly is running on those 5 wire plugs from / to E-bike controllers and as those seems to be "standard" it should be possible to find out pin out - maybe it's speed control like the "gas" handle / collar / buttons on the bike plus some other signalling?

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5 minutes ago, HEC said:

Indeed though question is how much overall voltage it can survive plus what exactly is running on those 5 wire plugs from / to E-bike controllers and as those seems to be "standard" it should be possible to find out pin out - maybe it's speed control like the "gas" handle / collar / buttons on the bike plus some other signalling?

Could be... hopefully it comes with at least some rudimentary manual ;)

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38 minutes ago, esaj said:

Could be... hopefully it comes with at least some rudimentary manual ;)

It does - other sellers claims "English manual" and in some you can see it on pictures as well ... let's hope it's not too much Chinglish :P

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Here is the manual.

It is most likely usefull for testesting the motor only not the controller since our controller use a gyro and not a throtle. However for the controller it may work by simulating a throtle by inclining the board.

On the motor it will test the phase wires and hall sensors, and also report the hall angle of the motor.

It uses 9 volts, it does not sit in between the control board and motor.

It should work on 84v motors if the motor is spinned slowly by hand so that it does not generate a huge voltage.

It does not test the speed of the motor.

I ordered one recently from ebay only $1 more then aliexpress.

UsingTheLyenEbikeTester.pdf

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