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I heard from a friend of mine that his friend was able to sneaking in the hoover board, passed the US security and airline check but while transiting in S. Korea, they seized his hoover board.

Edited by tengtengvn

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On 8/24/2016 at 1:02 AM, el31415 said:

I had the confiscation covered , I had a pre printed fedex shipping label , and went way early to check in with plenty of time if needed to exit .in the event of any trouble and if I couldn't  talk my way through, was going to exit and just ship it fedex as electronic parts and not mention any battery.

but luckily they let it pass...

 

sorry that that happen to you. And I think it is one of the difficulties of air travel. I think it is good we can talk about it and sort out what peoples experiences are and see what we cn do to fix tings or hack a way through the broken system. You mention a number of times that you think the wh is too much or that the amount of lithium is too much.. Can you say how mch lihthium or wh hours your battery has and how much lithium your battery has, and your source of this inforrmation, so we all cnn have a base undertanding of what you are talking about. 

 

Edited by Synap

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@Jojo33A

The documents may help if you want to use a courier (DHL, UPS etc) for air shipment of a Mini Pro battery pack. 

I guess the only way to find out is to send the documents to a courier and ask them.

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13 minutes ago, ATH said:

@Jojo33A

The documents may help if you want to use a courier (DHL, UPS etc) for air shipment of a Mini Pro battery pack. 

I guess the only way to find out is to send the documents to a courier and ask them.

Well its good to know ?

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On August 26, 2016 at 10:55 AM, Synap said:

sorry that that happen to you. And I think it is one of the difficulties of air travel. I think it is good we can talk about it and sort out what peoples experiences are and see what we cn do to fix tings or hack a way through the broken system. You mention a number of times that you think the wh is too much or that the amount of lithium is too much.. Can you say how mch lihthium or wh hours your battery has and how much lithium your battery has, and your source of this inforrmation, so we all cnn have a base undertanding of what you are talking about. 

 

Mini pro is 310wh

the limit for air travel is 100wh

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On 8/26/2016 at 2:55 AM, Synap said:

 

 

heh. I give the inventor/creator some credit for an interesting design -- especially the shape of the battery packs and where it was placed. So pretty good design. But the material used to build this wheel chair looks total shite. It doesn't look like it'll last long at all with repeated use. It'd actually be pretty nice if they made it to last like the original Segways but then I guess this chair would costs thousands of USD like the original Segways. haha.. A for design. D for quality of components. 

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HI everyone - I am new to this forum, but I want to report that I just returned on a Delta flight - roundtrip from Austin to LA and LA to Austin.  I was not only allowed to bring my Segway Ninebot Mini pro on the flight, but was allowed to ride it through the airport, to the gate and brought it with me on the plane and put in overhead bin!  I told them it was an EPAMD - which it is - check the Segway info about it.  I also have IPAH and this little ZOOM - as I have nicknamed it has changed my life as I can now get around.

I had to call ahead and tell them I was bringing it and they checked it everywhere, but it was all good.  They were fine with the battery (because it is a dry battery) and understood it was not a hoverboard. 

Everyone at Delta was great about allowing it.  For people with IPAH, this is a game changer.  I love this device and the fact that I can travel with it on a plane!!!!

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5 hours ago, Living with IPAH said:

HI everyone - I am new to this forum, but I want to report that I just returned on a Delta flight - roundtrip from Austin to LA and LA to Austin.  I was not only allowed to bring my Segway Ninebot Mini pro on the flight, but was allowed to ride it through the airport, to the gate and brought it with me on the plane and put in overhead bin!  I told them it was an EPAMD - which it is - check the Segway info about it.  I also have IPAH and this little ZOOM - as I have nicknamed it has changed my life as I can now get around.

I had to call ahead and tell them I was bringing it and they checked it everywhere, but it was all good.  They were fine with the battery (because it is a dry battery) and understood it was not a hoverboard. 

Everyone at Delta was great about allowing it.  For people with IPAH, this is a game changer.  I love this device and the fact that I can travel with it on a plane!!!!

That's up to the airline to accept or refuse.

Segway can call it whatever they want if the airline refuse to let you take it with you, you have NO recourse as it is over the WH limit for lithium ion battery allowed on passages airplane.

"They were fine with the battery (because it is a dry battery)..." It's lithium ion battery. And they are permited as check in on DELTA if they identify your device as EPAMD it would have been a total different story if they call it a Recreational Vehicles. 

https://www.delta.com/content/dam/delta-www/pdfs/baggage/acceptance_guidelines.pdf

Some airlines specifically forbid any overboard and Segway .

I did extensive research and for my airline , I had no other choice than to remove the battery and to sneak/check it in.

Best advice is to do as you did and call head and get authorization as you did .

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Did anyone read about the plane that blew up because they said it was carrying a pallet of lithium batteries and one went bad and ignited the rest of them?  No wonder the airlines are restricting them, they can be dangerous.  Look at the Youtube video of a guy piercing a laptop battery with a knife and shorting it out, it burned rapidly.  Boom!

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20 hours ago, steve454 said:

Did anyone read about the plane that blew up because they said it was carrying a pallet of lithium batteries and one went bad and ignited the rest of them?  No wonder the airlines are restricting them, they can be dangerous.  Look at the Youtube video of a guy piercing a laptop battery with a knife and shorting it out, it burned rapidly.  Boom!

No , I didn't read about that plane that blew up , but I did read about that plane that was carrying a live dinosaur that wake up in the middle of the fly and start moving around and caused the plane to crash ......

 

 

 

Edited by el31415
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On 9/3/2016 at 10:28 PM, Living with IPAH said:

HI everyone - I am new to this forum, but I want to report that I just returned on a Delta flight - roundtrip from Austin to LA and LA to Austin.  I was not only allowed to bring my Segway Ninebot Mini pro on the flight, but was allowed to ride it through the airport, to the gate and brought it with me on the plane and put in overhead bin!  I told them it was an EPAMD - which it is - check the Segway info about it.  I also have IPAH and this little ZOOM - as I have nicknamed it has changed my life as I can now get around.

I had to call ahead and tell them I was bringing it and they checked it everywhere, but it was all good.  They were fine with the battery (because it is a dry battery) and understood it was not a hoverboard. 

Everyone at Delta was great about allowing it.  For people with IPAH, this is a game changer.  I love this device and the fact that I can travel with it on a plane!!!!

AWESOME!!

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I'm currently a captain on a lear jet, and have taken my airwheel everywhere! Just took my Segway mini pro on its first trip. Atlanta/Burlington Vermont/Indianapolis....

i have been hesitating taking a new job flying airline based on the fact I won't be able to take it with me anymore :(

but when it comes to airline travel you are correct in the fact that even though the Segway is certified not to catch fire...the lack of responsibility of the hover board thermal runaways has done its damage.

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(Warning: electrochemical geekery ahead.)

Folks, there has been some incorrect information above because of the conflation of "lithium batteries" with lithium-ion batteries, which are what the Ninebot Mini and Segway miniPro use. Both are high-energy and potentially flammable, but lithium batteries are exceptionally dangerous because they cannot be extinguished by any commonly-used fire retardant except for Class D (which is unsuitable for other types of fires and can't be made in a single composition with A, B, or C, so are uncommon except in industrial sites that need to be ready for metal fires), while lithium-ion battery fires are easily extinguished by CO2, foam, or household ABC extinguisher retardant — including both manual and automatic extinguishers in airliner cabins.

I'd say if, as in the case of the earlier poster, you have a disability, call the airline ahead and notify them it's a mobility device, arrive early, and plan to carry it on — a doctor's note would be highly recommended (as is true whenever you may enter a private building and want to ride rather than trolly it behind you or have to lock it up).

If you don't have a disability, it comes down to whether your fallback position is "try to smuggle it" or not. Airlines and the FAA prefer lithium-ion packs of any size be carried on rather than checked (because a fire can be quickly dealt with before it gets to the point of automatic retardant systems in the cargo bay deploying), so attempting to carry it on should be your first choice as well, but if you're determined, putting it in checked luggage with certification documentation like was posted above taped to it (while having a backup plan like prepaid ground shipping materials back home, or bringing someone with you who could take the device, or leaving enough time to take it home and return) could be an option. (You could probably even then ask to carry it on instead, but that seems much less likely to work in this case.)

Of course, even if it may feel like an overreaction, the potential danger of high-energy-density lithium-ion packs isn't made up. Lithium batteries at high densities (such as palletized for shipment) can relatively easily enter thermal runaway, causing temperatures high enough for an airliner's cargo bay fire suppression systems to automatically deploy Halon before a fire started—essentially wasting most of the Halon and allowing a fire to later begin and proceed uninhibited. It is not proven but believed that lithium-ion packs can also reach that energy density palletized.

Even having a device that hasn't been implicated in previous fires doesn't protect you from having a dud (as the Apple iPhone 7 explosion recently shows), or having sustained some battery damage along the way that could lead to an in-flight fire. (It's still unknown whether the conditions of airplane flight and/or airliner cargo bays increases the chance of a thermal runaway in Li-ion battery packs. A single Segway doesn't have the energy density for catastrophic thermal runaway such as may have incapacitated the crew of flight MH370, but even a single-cell fire would cause smoke, fire suppression system activation, and almost certainly emergency landing — for which you can bet you'd be charged both civilly and criminally.)

So I wouldn't check one (but since I have spinal arthritis and do use mine as a mobility assistive device, I probably won't have to make that choice). But if you're set on doing so, at least make sure it's charged at between 40–80% capacity charged for greatest safety. (In my experience, a cold miniPro can charge from 80% to full in less than half an hour, so even if you plan on using it immediately after landing, I wouldn't risk having it charged over 80%. Maybe just carry it to wherever you're topping it off it so it doesn't warm up, or let it cool for 15 minutes or so before charging — a hot battery will take more than 15 minutes longer to charge than one that's cooled down for 15 minutes.)

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16 hours ago, Trey said:

(Warning: electrochemical geekery ahead.)

Folks, there has been some incorrect information above because of the conflation of "lithium batteries" with lithium-ion batteries, which are what the Ninebot Mini and Segway miniPro use. Both are high-energy and potentially flammable, but lithium batteries are exceptionally dangerous because they cannot be extinguished by any commonly-used fire retardant except for Class D (which is unsuitable for other types of fires and can't be made in a single composition with A, B, or C, so are uncommon except in industrial sites that need to be ready for metal fires), while lithium-ion battery fires are easily extinguished by CO2, foam, or household ABC extinguisher retardant — including both manual and automatic extinguishers in airliner cabins.

I'd say if, as in the case of the earlier poster, you have a disability, call the airline ahead and notify them it's a mobility device, arrive early, and plan to carry it on — a doctor's note would be highly recommended (as is true whenever you may enter a private building and want to ride rather than trolly it behind you or have to lock it up).

If you don't have a disability, it comes down to whether your fallback position is "try to smuggle it" or not. Airlines and the FAA prefer lithium-ion packs of any size be carried on rather than checked (because a fire can be quickly dealt with before it gets to the point of automatic retardant systems in the cargo bay deploying), so attempting to carry it on should be your first choice as well, but if you're determined, putting it in checked luggage with certification documentation like was posted above taped to it (while having a backup plan like prepaid ground shipping materials back home, or bringing someone with you who could take the device, or leaving enough time to take it home and return) could be an option. (You could probably even then ask to carry it on instead, but that seems much less likely to work in this case.)

Of course, even if it may feel like an overreaction, the potential danger of high-energy-density lithium-ion packs isn't made up. Lithium batteries at high densities (such as palletized for shipment) can relatively easily enter thermal runaway, causing temperatures high enough for an airliner's cargo bay fire suppression systems to automatically deploy Halon before a fire started—essentially wasting most of the Halon and allowing a fire to later begin and proceed uninhibited. It is not proven but believed that lithium-ion packs can also reach that energy density palletized.

Even having a device that hasn't been implicated in previous fires doesn't protect you from having a dud (as the Apple iPhone 7 explosion recently shows), or having sustained some battery damage along the way that could lead to an in-flight fire. (It's still unknown whether the conditions of airplane flight and/or airliner cargo bays increases the chance of a thermal runaway in Li-ion battery packs. A single Segway doesn't have the energy density for catastrophic thermal runaway such as may have incapacitated the crew of flight MH370, but even a single-cell fire would cause smoke, fire suppression system activation, and almost certainly emergency landing — for which you can bet you'd be charged both civilly and criminally.)

So I wouldn't check one (but since I have spinal arthritis and do use mine as a mobility assistive device, I probably won't have to make that choice). But if you're set on doing so, at least make sure it's charged at between 40–80% capacity charged for greatest safety. (In my experience, a cold miniPro can charge from 80% to full in less than half an hour, so even if you plan on using it immediately after landing, I wouldn't risk having it charged over 80%. Maybe just carry it to wherever you're topping it off it so it doesn't warm up, or let it cool for 15 minutes or so before charging — a hot battery will take more than 15 minutes longer to charge than one that's cooled down for 15 minutes.)

Here official Ninebot declaration

- Fire fighting mesure

- battery ingredient

Below pictures you can dowload official PDF for FCC about mini pro battery test attached file

or

http://mini-j.jimdo.com/home/mini-technical/battery/

 

modefirefighting measures.png

tableau ingredients.PNG

 

 

msds-mini-pro-310wh-li-batttery-r011509190b-543v-310wh-msds.pdf

Edited by Jojo33A

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On 8/25/2016 at 5:50 PM, el31415 said:

You can call it whatever you want , the mini pro battery is over the allowed limit in lithium and Wh. and cannot travel in passenger airplane . 

 

 

In planning a trip to Italy, we signed up for a Segway tour.  Much easier than bringing our own MiniPros.

Upcoming trips by Amtrak trains, I checked on regulations and I'm allowed a carry-on in a bag that fits the MiniPro in size and weight.

This removes complicated regulations in bringing bicycles or scooters that restricted me before.

I brought my MiniPro in plain sight using Chicago public transportation on a train today.  On a bus, I will probably put it on a canvas bag to easily carry it in confined spaces.

The flexibility that the MiniPro provides has allowed to go places that have been previously inconvenient.

 

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I know this is an old thread, but I just wanted to report that Southwest Airlines allowed my disabled husband to bring his Minipro on board in a trip two weeks ago, round trip from New York to Nashville.

We had to arrive at the airport a little early for the customer service people to inspect and tag it. After that he rode it through the airport, through security and to the gate with no hassles. Southwest gate checked it and had it available for him at the gate upon arrival.

For what it's worth, my husband has added aftermarket handlebars so it looks a lot more like a small Segway than like a hoverboard. Also, he is clearly disabled with Parkinson's so maybe that discouraged anyone from giving him a hard time.

We have an upcoming trip on Delta, so we'll see how that goes....

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1 hour ago, megmno said:

I know this is an old thread, but I just wanted to report that Southwest Airlines allowed my disabled husband to bring his Minipro on board in a trip two weeks ago, round trip from New York to Nashville.

We had to arrive at the airport a little early for the customer service people to inspect and tag it. After that he rode it through the airport, through security and to the gate with no hassles. Southwest gate checked it and had it available for him at the gate upon arrival.

For what it's worth, my husband has added aftermarket handlebars so it looks a lot more like a small Segway than like a hoverboard. Also, he is clearly disabled with Parkinson's so maybe that discouraged anyone from giving him a hard time.

We have an upcoming trip on Delta, so we'll see how that goes....

Glad this worked out for both of you.

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16 hours ago, megmno said:

I know this is an old thread, but I just wanted to report that Southwest Airlines allowed my disabled husband to bring his Minipro on board in a trip two weeks ago, round trip from New York to Nashville.

We had to arrive at the airport a little early for the customer service people to inspect and tag it. After that he rode it through the airport, through security and to the gate with no hassles. Southwest gate checked it and had it available for him at the gate upon arrival.

For what it's worth, my husband has added aftermarket handlebars so it looks a lot more like a small Segway than like a hoverboard. Also, he is clearly disabled with Parkinson's so maybe that discouraged anyone from giving him a hard time.

We have an upcoming trip on Delta, so we'll see how that goes....

Thanks very much for the report, this is encouraging.  It's also great to hear something nice about an airline for a change.  I hope your trip was very enjoyable.

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On 9/1/2017 at 1:15 PM, FreeRide said:

Thanks very much for the report, this is encouraging.  It's also great to hear something nice about an airline for a change.  I hope your trip was very enjoyable.

Completing a vacation trip in Italy for over 10 days, I missed the ease of gliding that the MiniPro provides for sight seeing.

We did a Segway tour with the bigger units.  I would have preferred the freedom of exploring on my own with the only limitation of the amount of battery charge.

In the future, I will consider shipping our MiniPros ahead or possibly buying units and selling them when we depart.

This has been discussed before.

 

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Rules for traveling with a Lithium battery by itself and those for one installed in a device, where the battery is not meant to be easily  removed by the end user are not the same.

Furthermore, I searched the web and have not been able to find ANY cases of a Segway or Ninebot product catching fire.  These devices are built for safety.

 

 

Edited by FLORIDIAN
more info.

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On 8/16/2016 at 6:17 PM, ATH said:

It seems the 300Wh limit is for wheelchairs and other devices for people with disabilities.

In fact, our beloved Ninebot Minis are not allowed onboard at all ?: 

"Notice regarding hoverboards

Please note that in the interest of safety for our customers and employees, we do not accept hoverboards as checked or carry-on baggage."

https://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/baggage/default.aspx?Mobile=1&uamobile=1

Guidelines for electronic equipment in general :

https://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/baggage/dangerous.aspx?Mobile=1

-------

Link to the  IATA (International Air Transport Association) Lithium Battery Guidance Document:

https://www.icra2016.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2016/04/lithium-battery-guidance-document-2016-en.pdf

You are looking in the wrong place if you are looking for information for people with disabilities.

Federal regulations found here:
in subparagraph 17 which specifically deals with "a wheelchair or other mobility aid equipped with a lithium ion battery, when carried as checked baggage" indicate that: 
A non-spillable battery that is designed to be non-removable and is attached to a mobility assistance device, where the unit can be securely turned off should be loaded into cargo (17 sub-section iv).
 
The maximum limit as to the size of the battery of 300 WH ONLY applies to batteries that are designed to be removable or carried loose (sub-section v).
 
Note that section 17 (v) and paragraphs (A) through (E)  do not apply to devices that are not designed to have their batteries removed by the user, so the
300 watt hour restriction would also not apply.

Clearly Section 17 does not specify a maximum WH ratting, when used as "a wheelchair or other mobility aid equipped with a lithium ion battery."

 

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