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EU's legal in Sweeden, Denmark and Germany?


Lorents

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Hello,

My son and I are going to Denmark and Germany this summer and we thought about bringing our EU's on the trip but it suddenly struck me that they might not be legal there...

Do anyone know what the rules are for using EU's in Denmark and Germany?
Ah, and we are probably going to Sweeden too so it would be cool if anyone know the rules over there.

Here in Norway its legal if you are above 16 years, keep speed below 20 km/h and the EU have lights, reflex and a horn/bell to warn pedestrians :)

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Well - I ride in Germany, have ridden past policemen who have all been nice and just smiled. BUT unicycles are operated in a grey area - you may only use motorised vehicles on sidewalks up to 6 kmh - unicycles go faster than this. However to be allowed to use motorized vehicles in cycle lanes, you would need all sorts of modifications (such as redundancy - one computer fails, the next kicks in like on a segway to prevent you from crashing due to a fault in the electronics). With these modifications you would then need to go to the TÜV, who check it for road worthiness and then get a license plate. All of this is of course unfeasible, I heard on another forum that that would cost upwards of 20,000€. So at the moment there are more and more EU riders in Germany and most of them have had no negative experience. 

So to answer your question: bring your EU's, the worst that can happen is probably that someone warns you off. 

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The emerging redundancy criteria doesn't really make much sense: almost all EU failures (that are not directly operator error), can invariably be put down to bad engineering design choices & lack of intrinsic safety, like pedal-tilt-back. There's a lot to be done before the industry should be evaluating the benefit of redundant control systems.

 

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Thank you very much for the detailed answer sunny! 

Very interesting how different countries make different rules for EU's. I am supprised to see that Norway is among the liberal countries.

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The EU's are legal in Denmark on a per year dispensation basis.

They are considered belonging to the bicycles and must run on special bicycle-tracks or roads where non are available.

Max. allowed possible speed for an EU is 20 km/h.

The EU must have reflexes - White in front, yellow to the side and red to the backside.

I actually believe they are supposed to have a bell "on the steering-handle"....For a Segway, no problem but for an EU it is. Maybe a handbell would be considered acceptable. I have none.

So very similar to Norway.

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I actually believe they are supposed to have a bell "on the steering-handle"....For a Segway, no problem but for an EU it is. Maybe a handbell would be considered acceptable. I have none.

​You mean a cowbell? :)

Who actually uses the bike's bell?

Law just changed this year in Finland that bikes don't have to have fixed lights anymore.

 

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Well - I ride in Germany, have ridden past policemen who have all been nice and just smiled. BUT unicycles are operated in a grey area - you may only use motorised vehicles on sidewalks up to 6 kmh - unicycles go faster than this. However to be allowed to use motorized vehicles in cycle lanes, you would need all sorts of modifications (such as redundancy - one computer fails, the next kicks in like on a segway to prevent you from crashing due to a fault in the electronics). With these modifications you would then need to go to the TÜV, who check it for road worthiness and then get a license plate. All of this is of course unfeasible, I heard on another forum that that would cost upwards of 20,000€. So at the moment there are more and more EU riders in Germany and most of them have had no negative experience.

So to answer your question: bring your EU's, the worst that can happen is probably that someone warns you off.

​Oh two sunny~~~Nice to meet you  :) 

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Probably not on a commercial flight, but on a private plane there are no one stopping you :)

Edit: Hmm, I'll have to check if lithium batteries is considered dangerous goods and what the rules are before flying with my EU...

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