Jump to content

Learning to ride my first wheel - the Sherman S


Kitty

Recommended Posts

And so it begins. Sounds like a good first day though! Don't forget about short sessions with sleeping in between... being too exhausted isn't productive and while I have no idea why sleep helps so much, it does work some kind of magic.

Yay! You're this far 🤏 from being a wheel junkie.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congratulations on day one! Sounds like you’re off to a good start. You’ll learn more every time you ride, one of the advantages of this hobby. Practice when you can, it will be exhausting at first. You’ll likely get some bruising. At some point things will start clicking into place and you’ll be doing the closest thing to flying in a lucid dream. Have fun! Ride safe! 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Learning to ride an EUC will be one of the things that your glad you did when you look back at your journey. I bought my first EUC May of last year and not even a year later I own 3 wheels  (Sherman S incoming). It's addictive to ride and even more so when you're so in tune with the wheel that it just feels like an extension of your legs. Glad you've joined us!

Edited by Clem604
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first day on the wheel was on Friday morning. I planned to rise early Saturday and practice on the wall in my parking lot.

Well that didn't happen. I was still exhausted from the day before. Not sore, thankfully, but really no energy. So I took Saturday and Sunday off and probably Monday as well. We're having intermittent showers again and it's just too much to chase clear times.

I had only one bruise on the back of my shin, not bad. But pushing a one hundred pound wheel around for a couple of hours was not so easy for me as it turned out. Turns out I did get a small case of 'road rash' but it wasn't caused by falling. I rubbed the back of my arm against the truck of a tree and got a mild scrape. It's all band aided up and healing quickly. I am still bummed out about that handle. It looks great but once you raise it up there is no place to hold on to it without distorting your hand. Looks 10, functionality 5. But it does work.

My goal for my next day out is to stand beside the wall and do some pendulums for about five minutes. Than it will be time to begin to feel my way down the wall and back again. When that begins to be easy I'll doing a pendulum and pushing myself off down the wall without touching it. Unfortunately I do not have a parking garage nearby to practice with the pillars so it's just me and the wall for a while.

I am just excited about being able to make a circle of any size in our parking lot.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kitty said:

that handle

 

Would it be better to not use the lift up handle?

Maybe just use one of the lifting handles instead.

 

Edited by Paul A
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are making more progress than I did when I started!  Congratulations!  🎉. One day you will get on your wheel and simply ride.  Not a clue how those dynamics work but they do!  I am a helicopter pilot by profession, when you first start, hovering is absolutely impossible!  Then one day you just magically rise into a perfect hover, and 35 years later I still remember that first perfect hover.  Well EUC seems to be very similar,  one day I was starting to get discouraged and decided to stop for the day. Next morning, just as a lark decided to try again. Self launched and rode around in the (almost) perfect figure 8. Magic strikes again!  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Kitty said:

when I am holding the wheel up and it begins to fall, if I am unable to maintain balance it will twist my wrist.

Don't worry about that. You'll get used to trolleying about such that you always keep it upright enough that it never goes tippy. When general manhandling though I find that just one handle is not enough to support a wheel that heavy, so I try and remember to grab both ends at once, or at least use another stabilising hand to stop it twisting away.

When I first got a big heavy wheel I found it helpful after free dismounting (1 foot on pedal keeping it upright and controlling forward / back movement, and 1 foot stationary on ground) to reach down with my opposite hand to the foot on the pedal to touch the top of the case, just in case foot pressure wasn't quite enough to keep it upright alone. Don't need it now, but it did stop a good few side-overs early on...

Lastly, curling toes is a bit weird - fairly sure most of us aren't doing that to accelerate or steer ! ;) But hey, whatever works...

Edited by Cerbera
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Kitty said:

gloves but they don't fit over my wrist guards

Maybe try gloves under the wrist guards.

 

56 minutes ago, Kitty said:

bend one or the other to steer.

Maybe try bending and moving one knee forward.

Try bending and moving both knees forward, to move.  Or simply lean slightly forward.

Might be less fatiguing than using toes over time.

 

Nice progress

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Kitty, for the inspiration and confidence boost!  I’m about to learn on a big wheel too.  Might not be the easiest way to learn but it’s a rout that a few others here on the forum have taken.

Two questions:

Did you get bumpers for you wheel or go with some other padding option to protect it during the initial learning phase?  

Are you starting out with power pads on the Serman S?  

Edited by Josiah
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like Paul mentioned, put your wrist guards over the gloves. They’re designed to slide on concrete the fabric will stop that from happening. 
You’re doing really well! Keep at it. It’s worth the learning curve. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kitty said:

Day #2 of training...

More progress.

. . . 

I noticed the wheel was starting to wobble as I just stood there and rested and I realized dealing with a 100  pound wheel really is difficult. So I packed it in for the day. I guess I was out there maybe 45 minutes. Hot day, flannel shirt, no skill level. Yeah, go home for another day.

Progress is good, keep making progress and you will get there!

When you are getting tired or sore or your muscles are starting to struggle - call it a day. There will be other days and over time your body adapts and you will eventually be fine riding around for 2 or 3 hours - you don't have to get to that point straight away, give yourself time to adapt to this new activity!

When I first learned to ride I just did an hour a day. On day 1 I was sweating bullets and I was happy to go home and rest. Each day I went out to learn & practise, things improved. It didn't take long before I was no longer physically exhausted after an hour of practising. I just went out and practised stuff, then went home and relaxed, got a good night sleep and went out on another day to practise.

Initially I just learned and practised mounting & dismounting, speeding up & slowing down, turning left and turning right. Get these basics down fairly well and you will be able to practise and ride around well enough to keep making progress. Jumping the wheel or riding backwards or other cool skills, don't worry about doing anything like that anytime soon, just worry about getting a handle on the basics. Just practise when you can, for as long as you are OK to do it for and keep making progress.  You are pretty brave to start out with something as heavy as the Sherman S, don't expect yourself to master something like that in a couple of days. Just work on getting to the point where you can mount and ride the wheel, after that you can spend time mounting & riding the wheel - as easy as that!

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kitty said:

cruise down the river path

Good idea, sounds nice. May I tentatively suggest a leash for those sorts of adventures, should you be the sort of person who wants to make extra sure your wheel isn't goin' in the drink...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Kitty said:

I got a one-half inch thick neoprene exercise mat and duct taped it around the wheel. Then I cut slits for the pedals and it seems perfect though a bit wider than it already was. But so it's working great. And am I using power pads...? I'm nowhere close to being able to make use of those. And with the raincoat on the wheel there's no place for them anyway. I'll know when it's time for power pads. Could be years at the rate I'm going. I'll get a photo next time. (meaning I have to figure out how photos work.)

Again, thanks for the encouragement as a week from now I’ll be experiencing my day one, two and three.  But it might be hard to find a practice area without snow and ice.  
I’ve heard a few comments from other folks on here (none of them beginners) but that after they had tried the bigger wheels without the pads, they immediately realized without the pads they have nowhere near enough control.  

I’m going with Clark bumpers, and Grizzla flow pads from day one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arm flailing is normal and usually a part of the learning process. One of the hardest parts of learning for me was getting over the urgency of being able to actually ride. You’re doing well, people learn at different rates, just be patient and persistent. Be satisfied with minor gains. 
If you’re interested in reading about my experiences and the help I got from the forum, I have a thread in this section. I’m only a year and a bit ahead of you. Keep at it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ditto, just found a post from @Paul A  in @Hellkitten’s thread.   Learning to ride on a V11 

s-l400.jpg.0336c842bac7647e7574680ca1cbe
I’ve been using the same balance board. Borrowed from the kids to get some new muscle memory going.   That’s before my wheel gets here of course but I could see using it between wheel sessions as mellow in the family room training while watching tv.  

Edited by Josiah
  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Kitty said:

frantically grab the wall beside me and hold on for dear life.

 

Another option is using a shopping cart.  

Acts like a mobile walking frame.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/30/2023 at 4:29 PM, Kitty said:

handle

 

Perhaps attach a better handle to the existing trolley handle..... using hose clamps.

Clamps will ensure a tight/secured fastening.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcReuJf8j1KwnPY6nuFTxas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Kitty said:

I know just the place if they will let me practice. We shall see about that.

Maybe ask for forgiveness rather than permission.  Just watch out for the auto locking ones.  Last thing you need is a theft prevention mechanism stopping the thing with you and a 110 lb wheel right behind it at 5+ mph.  

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...