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Engine Oil Pressure Warning Light


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I was just pondering how the warning beep on an EUC is much like the engine oil pressure warning light on a car.  It's telling us of imminent failure and yet so many people opt to ignore it.

When I was an automotive engineer we'd so often have a tow truck bring in a car with a totally seized motor.  When questioned the owner would admit 'oh yeah I noticed the oil light was on but kept driving'.  Most warning lights come in one of two colors - Amber or Red.  Amber generally means 'get this looked at soon' whilst Red means 'stop immediately'.  Stopping can save you considerable money.  Fixing the issue may be as simple as topping up the oil.  Continuing may mean a complete new motor.  In worst case scenarios it can even cause a fatal accident if the motor seizes up at an inopportune time.

What worries me is when flying cars become a reality . . . 

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8 hours ago, OldFartRides said:

College aged girl of someone I know is on her third engine.

Sounds like she should consider public transport.  Or get an EV.

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12 hours ago, Lex Smith said:

I was just pondering how the warning beep on an EUC is much like the engine oil pressure warning light on a car.  It's telling us of imminent failure and yet so many people opt to ignore it.

Usually up to the point of their first faceplant. Some people just have to learn the hard way, human nature for some people.

The problem is, most riders actually know a little too much about their wheels. They know that there is always X amount of speed left after the final beeps (GW for example). So they ride a little more. And assuming they only ride a little over, and it's a flat surface, and they don't accelerate...and...and...the wheel will keep going for as long as the battery lasts. I have seen a few peeps riding the GW final beeps for miles and miles without trouble.

Your oil light example is slightly different because most cars (certainly the older ones which were oil pressure based, not oil level) WILL fail very shortly after the red light comes on. You don't get the option of running a car engine for very long without oil pressure. Seconds tbh.

My ass falls out every time I hear a beep so it's not a territory I dabble with, but in some ways I think it would be better if riders believed that the final beep was on a 3 second countdown. Go beyond that and the wheel shuts down. That might focus their mind a bit :)

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10 hours ago, Planemo said:

Usually up to the point of their first faceplant. Some people just have to learn the hard way, human nature for some people.

The problem is, most riders actually know a little too much about their wheels. They know that there is always X amount of speed left after the final beeps (GW for example). So they ride a little more. And assuming they only ride a little over, and it's a flat surface, and they don't accelerate...and...and...the wheel will keep going for as long as the battery lasts. I have seen a few peeps riding the GW final beeps for miles and miles without trouble.

Your oil light example is slightly different because most cars (certainly the older ones which were oil pressure based, not oil level) WILL fail very shortly after the red light comes on. You don't get the option of running a car engine for very long without oil pressure. Seconds tbh.

My ass falls out every time I hear a beep so it's not a territory I dabble with, but in some ways I think it would be better if riders believed that the final beep was on a 3 second countdown. Go beyond that and the wheel shuts down. That might focus their mind a bit :)

I see your point - thinking about it the beep is probably more like the low fuel warning light on your car.  You know you still have a good few miles left.  In my case I never let my fuel level fall below half and I've got a can of petrol in the back just in case.

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Petrol does go stale and lose its freshness through oxidation, around 30 days.

Petrol in a sealed can/container can last around six months at 20 Celsius. 

Around three months at 30 Celsius.

Can of petrol sitting around for a long time might not be good to put into fuel tank.

Expired petrol can cause damage to your car's pistons during ignition, which makes it harder to start the engine and reduces your car's performance when revving the engine.

 

Lawnmowers, brush cutters and other petrol driven tools should be left running until all the fuel in the tank and lines are run dry.

This prevents acid and gum deposits forming in the fuel system and/or carburetor that will cause damage.

 

 

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Over speed and threshold beeps are not warnings to me. They are a mistake! Its FAR too easy to lose track of how fast you are going and how much you aks from a wheel when accellerating. I hit threshold beeps from time to time and it doesnt even seem like I was asking much. Riding the beeps is like driving with an oil light on. Yeah, maybe there's JUST enough there to keep things going. Then again, maybe not. Why freaking risk it either way? On my 18xl, I set my ONLY beeps at 2mph lower than max. Over a long enough timeline, my perception of my wheels top speed has changed to the lower top speed. I know it works, as its been seemingly forever since I've hit tiltback (actual top speed). I wish the fu**ing sherman would let me set it the same damn way. Yup, self trained in the interests of self preservation. Theres a method to the madness. Being slightly 'crazy' is one thing. Being blatantly stupid is another entirely.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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16 hours ago, Planemo said:

the final beep was on a 3 second countdown

I think of my top speed beep as "operator has requested initiation of self destruct sequence, operator ejection mechanism has been armed".

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6 minutes ago, Tawpie said:

I think of my top speed beep as "operator has requested initiation of self destruct sequence, operator ejection mechanism has been armed".

I consider beeps a veiled threat. Something along the lines of.. "i'm warning you, Ima beat the holy f**k outta you if you dont ease up, bro!" I dont use many beeps as they all sound too similar. If you teach yourself to ignore a beep because its not the LIMIT beep, how you gna react when it is? You know, like the parent who yells at their kid too much. You're only teaching them to ignore and it could be at peril. I come from a world of swift consequences...:wacko:

Funny story. My Dad had a toyota tercel. His oil light came on at a red light. BEFORE he could even cross the intersection, it siezed up. My mother owned an old Opal. It went days on end with oil light on. Yup, kinda like 'top speed' beeps. You dont really know EXACTLY how accurate they are. Tis a lot to just depend on, when its only air between your face and the concrete...

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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2 hours ago, Paul A said:

Petrol does go stale and lose its freshness through oxidation, around 30 days.

Petrol in a sealed can/container can last around six months at 20 Celsius. 

Around three months at 30 Celsius.

Can of petrol sitting around for a long time might not be good to put into fuel tank.

Expired petrol can cause damage to your car's pistons during ignition, which makes it harder to start the engine and reduces your car's performance when revving the engine.

 

Lawnmowers, brush cutters and other petrol driven tools should be left running until all the fuel in the tank and lines are run dry.

This prevents acid and gum deposits forming in the fuel system and/or carburetor that will cause damage.

 

 

I actually run a 3 can system.  1 can in the van, 2 in the shed (5 litre cans).  When it's time to fill the van the can in the van goes into the van.  Then I refill it while refilling the van.  This can then goes into the shed and the oldest of the shed cans is promoted to the van.  The cans are numbered 1 to 3 so that I don't lose track.  The main purpose of the cans is for my back up generator and the sole purpose of the generator is to keep the fridge going in a grid down situation.  We store the bulk of my daughters insulin reserves in our fridge (and she keeps some at her apartment).

Prior to buying an EUC this meant the cans were being refreshed about every 6 weeks.  I am actually reviewing my system because since the EUC the van refills are few and far between.  I may just refresh the entire stock each time I refill the van.

At some stage I think I'll get a power bank and some solar panels and maybe a dedicated small refrigerator for the essentials.

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