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Pads for beginners? Yes or No?


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Hello

Im quite a new rider, and picked up an MSP HT 100v as my first wheel.

Seeing tons of recommendations to buy pads as a beginner i went ahead and bought the Red Trail Jump pads from Sai.

They fit the wheel like a glow and seems really good and durable.

But i have a problem, i have set the pads as high as possible on the wheel without it sticking out on the top, but i feel like my shoes needs force to be put in place, which as a beginner makes balance hell šŸ˜…

Is this how jump pads are supposed to be?

I'm a size 46-47 (12/13 us shoe size) are my feet to big for the pads? šŸ˜‚

Should I start riding without untill i got better balance?

Kind RegardsĀ 

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Hmmm , I definitely would not recommend jump pads for a beginner. As a beginner you need to be able to moveĀ around.Ā Ā When they said beginners should use pads did they mean safety gear? ( knee pads , elbow pads )Ā Ā Or did they mean pads to protect your wheel from damage? ( bodyguard) I Donā€™t think they meant jump pads.Ā 

There are lots of different kindsĀ pads.Ā 

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Also, you should put them as low as possible if you are going to use them as a beginner. I still do not recommend them as a beginner.Ā 

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If you use velcro tape on the shell and the pads, you can easily move them around to get the perfect fit. Pads are without a doubt the best thing you can add to your wheel, climbing and trail riding are so much easier and you have infinitely more control. You will eventually want them to pretty much clamp down on your forefoot, and Clarke pads also have heel pegs too. Once you get confident on the wheel having tight pads feels like ski bindings, you'll wonder how you ever rode without themĀ 

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Iā€™d say no, they keep you from moving freely. But then Iā€™d say no for later as well, except special reasons.

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No need for JUMP pads as a beginner. Put the pads up for a while, and learn to ride it without them. You need the free movement as you're going to be all over the damn thing in the beginning. You also need to learn to weight shift, not ride with pad leverage. Learning to ride with restrictive pads can easily be a detriment to muscle and mental development. Youll also want to be able to mount and dismount in a hurry as a newbie. Mounting perfectly being new is rare and foot locks may be one more thing in the way. Keep the pads for later, once you find the ability to toss the wheel around. I have some very wide pads on mine and they dont get touched 80% of the time. You can do a lot on a wheel with simple weight shift. Jump locks are great for jumping, but are you REALLY ready for that yet? fwiw, I dont jump and off-road much. I dont use jump blocks on any of my wheels, and only use ShanesPads on my sherm. One of these years I may add some jump blocks, but no need for me to just yet.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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So... I'm approaching 2k miles andĀ just nowĀ am experimenting with power pads. Not jump pads, not yet. I've found that power pads require a slightly different ride style and stance and am glad I have gotten reasonably good at riding before trying them. It's not that I don't think I could have learned with them, it's what the others are saying: learn to move around on the pedals, find the stance that works, learn to stop quickly, learn to deal with speed and braking wobbles. Then you're ready toĀ start pushing your wheel hard with pads. Otherwise, it seems like it'd be an unneeded complication.

Edited by Tawpie
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Thanks for the answers guys, your answers show pretty much what I was thinking.

The pads are truly amazing when riding over bumps etc, but other then that they feel more like a hazard for me :)

Will be putting them on a shelf for now, and look back at them with more experience :)

Ā 

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Agreed all with what folks have said previously. Iā€™m just underĀ the 1000 mile mark (combined between the Tesv2Ā and Nik+AR) and didnā€™t need pads at all for the lighter weight Tesla. For learning purposes, itā€™s beneficialĀ to ride ā€œnakedā€ so that you can understand the wheel mechanics and how your feet and legs interact with the wheel as you learn to ride.

Ā 

Once you get that through that part of the learning process, I do thinkĀ pads help quite a bit, especially with heavier wheels. Iā€™ve heard a few explanations andĀ it makesĀ sense that the extra contact points the pads provide pushed up againstĀ your shoes and shins addĀ better control,Ā reducesĀ fatigue, and grantsĀ more comfort.Ā Iā€™ve been using the stock smaller Begode pads shipped with recent wheels,Ā but am looking into larger pads for those,Ā as Speedy Feet described, ā€œhandlebarsā€ for your shins. I havenā€™t been interested in jumping my wheel thus far, so thatā€™s more of an afterthought on my end.

Edited by TheSlyGiraffEV
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