Jump to content

Is it better to teach others on small or big EUCs?


Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

I occasionally try to teach someone to ride on EUCs and I wonder what's better to use for the first hour or two, before the person learns to ride unassisted - those first few meters of windmill stance, etc. A small machine like an Inmotion V5, or a mid-range V10?

So far, I've been using the V5 for multiple reasons. It's lighter and weaker (so there is smaller risk of damage/injury), its cheaper (so people are less afraid that they break it and thus learning faster), and its very nimble. But I wonder if a bigger and stronger EUC (like V10) could be more practical for those first moments, as it will feel more stable? Maybe the V5 is too nimble?

I repeat, this is about the first hour or two. Once they are able to ride without holding onto anything, I will put them on the V5 anyway, as I think that everyone should experience the overlean/overbreak early on and at a low speed, rather than at 30+ km/h.

What's your experience with teaching others?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes its an interesting question, in general one recommend smaller wheels as starter mainly due to cost, but in the end they are probably not the easiest to learn on, being so very nimble. I had friends making it quickly on both 14 and 18" but I suspect a larger wheel is actually easier. It is takes more time to tilt and fall, needing less quick reactions.

The argument for smaller wheels overlean is good, starting with a small power envelope allows to understand it better. The NB S2 I started on had a power based beep that would kick in riding at speed over bumps, that was very intuitive.

Edited by null
Link to post
Share on other sites

Larger wheel is easier for the VERY first stage of learning imho. When I first began learning, I had an 18 and a 14. I couldnt even stand on either at all, but that little wheel was worse. Being so small made it VERY hard to even begin my learning, as there wasnt enough to put my leg against(im 130lbs and 6'3" tall). The larger wheel rode higher up my leg and offered a little more comfort and helped me not have to be so damn perfect when trying to get on the wheel. Of course, after the initial hour or two of learning, the smaller wheel may be easier to continue progress on. My mten is GREAT for learning slow riding and backwards and just basic no speed balance. However, the initial steps were easier on the 18. Even so, I dont put brand new 'riders' on my 18. Why? Because its my baby and cost a lot more. I let them hold onto my shouder and stand in place while they learn to ride the mten. Fun stuff, as you BOTH need be ready for the gotway dance, once he/she jumps off. I have taught 2 people to begin to ride with merely an mten and a shoulder in an empty street. I do think the 'student' also feels more at ease when you put them on a wheel that looks to have already been thru a  war. Being able to honestly tell them  "fuk that wheel, let it fall, we'll just pick it up' is probably more a factor than 10vs18 imho.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it sounds like depending on the individual, it is good to try different ones before deciding which one is for you to learn on.  Being a small guy, I tend to find a smaller, lighter wheel easier to counterbalance/grab/control onto with my foot. I started with KS16S. Now that I am much more competent, I can take on larger wheels. Oh... the question is which one you would use for teaching? I would use a wheel that the learner after trying different ones feel comfortable. If that's not an option, I would prefer a relatively small wheel.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Zopper said:

What's your experience with teaching others?

My 2 cents, it's not a matter of big vs little EUC, it's:

  • Tire Width (main factor)
  • Shell Height and comfortability (ie. pad, no pad)

Doesn't matter how big the wheel is, if the tire is still thinner (esp. 2.125" and below), that's gonna make it harder for the beginner rider to balance. Just think about if you over exaggerate the tire width: a super fat and flat tire is gonna be infinitely easier to balance on.

Then the shell height will factor in how easy it is to learn how to mount / free-mount the wheel. Higher (at least under knee height) and/or more comfort in padding will be best.

The "weight" factor of the wheel I never understood in general with EUC arguments: if you're not bear hugging the wheels with your legs, then it doesn't matter how big and heavy the wheel is, you're just playing see-saw between the pedals, leg to leg.

 

Thus, even if, say, the MTen3 is a small wheel, due to it's 2.75" wide tire, it is excellent IMHO for a beginner to balance on than the usual 14 and under but 2.125" thin tire EUC variety (albeit the angled sloping side of the MTen3 will make mounting a bit more difficult than the usual straight up side shell).

 

Soooooo, I'd say scrap the super thin tire V5 for newbies and use the thicker 2.5" V10 (good side shell height and padding to boot).

Edited by houseofjob
Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont know is V10F is "big" or "small" for me relative easy to learn. Ilearn on 100 sensitivity = +-(hard mode for gotway/kingsong).

38Psi too high for learn but i earn it anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/9/2021 at 1:58 AM, DjPanJan said:

I dont know is V10F is "big" or "small" for me relative easy to learn. Ilearn on 100 sensitivity = +-(hard mode for gotway/kingsong).

38Psi too high for learn but i earn it anyway.

It is a tall wheel for it size. 

The reason for you had it easier to learn on this is down to these 3 things (in my opinion) 

2.5" tire width. (like @houseofjob said width makes it easier)

The relative slim body design. 

Battery placement, this need a little explanation. 

Came this think this too. Lower pedals is you friend in the beginning, as it is about daring to step up and off. 

Now the battery is placed on the top compared to most other wheels where battery packs are on the side. The advantage for the V10 series design is it gives you support higher up the leg yet not too high. The battery makes it easy to make micro adjustment as you don't have as much weight to shift. But you feel very easy when the wheel is starting to tilt to the side but once it is tilted over the tire width it take a little more force to get it back in line so over reaction do not as easy end with over correction. 

In general I favour bigger rim sizes so a 18x2.5 as the KS18L/XL is properly one of the easiest wheels to learn on. The KS16X can do too as it is 16x3 (but not with CX tire). These reason you want a wide tire is the bigger patch you Standon the easier it is to find balance. So we are back to the l_l vs U vs V  shape patch. The I shape is easier to turn yet not feeling to stand on a knife edge that can tip over any time. 

I also thi g it is easier to move from a light weight wheel to a heavier wheel later. As a rider pick up speed stability becomes more important. Coming from a twitchy wheel (small and light) to a bigger and heavier will normally translate to more stability. 

I recall this last bit as very clearly moving from V8 to KS18L. But the KS16X was a totally different ballgame due to CX tire. 

All of the above but especially the high pedals make the V11 not recommend as a starter point to learn in my opinion. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...