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Your wheel catches FIRE while charging - what do you do?


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27 minutes ago, /Dev/Null said:

-20 to -30c

I can't think what that would do to a battery.

-20°C is the manufacturer-specified temperature limit, so please avoid going colder.

https://www.batteryspace.com/prod-specs/11514.pdf
 

20 minutes ago, null said:

fog and morning dew possibly corroding the battery

Yes.

Exposure to fog and condensation for long durations is a real hazard.

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My plan is to get the wheel outside at all costs. If its too damn hot to approach, I'll use a broom. If its too hot for that and I cant breathe, I'll still try and bathe the room in water. Not to put

The fumes are toxic, I agree with that, but I disagree about the rest. The only things that works for Li-ion fires is good old water. CO2, poweder, etc, makes absolutely no sense for Li-ion fires, bec

I wouldn't want to live in the same building as you, Shanes.

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9 hours ago, Tryptych said:

I have a fire extinguisher as well but I don't expect that to be much help in a battery fire.

Found this information on extinguishers, which I thought was good to know:
https://steadfastfire.com/how-to-extinguish-a-lithium-ion-battery-fire

Here's an extract: "Lithium-ion battery fires are extinguished using Class B fire extinguishers. This means that in the event that a device using lithium-ion batteries catches fire, a standard Class ABC or BC dry chemical fire extinguisher can be used to put it out. Class B classification is given for flammable liquid fires. These batteries contain liquid electrolytes and fit best in B fire classification."

 

1 hour ago, RagingGrandpa said:

-20°C is the manufacturer-specified temperature limit, so please avoid going colder.

https://www.batteryspace.com/prod-specs/11514.pdf

Great link, it's the specification for the LG M50T 21700 batteries in my new Nikola 100v, and they can be found in other wheels as well.
Ideally lithium-ion batteries should be kept at room temperature, away from humidity and the cold, and never discharged at lower temperatures than -20℃ as you said. It has lots of useful information, for example:

* 4.2.3 Max. Charge Current(Continuous)
  ** 0 ~ 25℃ - 0.3C (1,455mA)
  ** 25 ~ 45℃ - 0.7C (3,395mA)
* 4.2.4 Max. Discharge Current(Continuous)
  ** -20 ~ 10℃ - 0.5C (2,425mA)
  ** 10 ~ 25℃ - 3.0C(14,550mA)
  ** 25 ~ 55℃ - 1.5C (7,275mA)
* 4.3.1 Storage Characteristics - Cells shall be charged per 4.1.1 and stored in a temperature-controlled environment at 24ºC ± 2ºC for 30 days. After storage, cells shall be discharged per 4.1.2 to obtain the remaining energy. - Energy remaining rate ≥90% of Wh
* 5.1 Cautions for Use and Handling
  - Battery must be charged at operating temperature range 0 ~ 45℃.
  - Battery must be discharged at operating temperature range -20 ~ 55℃.
  - Battery must be stored in a dry area with low temperature for long-term storage.

Just to be on the safe side I never go out riding at temperatures lower than -10℃ (wind chill factor taken into acount) to avoid stressing the batteries too much. That's also the minimum operating temperature listed in the Veteran Sherman manual, so it's safe to assume other battery types only go down to -10℃. And when I'm outside I leave the EUC turned on at all times.

Makes you wonder what kind of magic Telsa and other EV manufacturers have done to let a car sit outside and be driven in our frigid Canadian winters with only reduced range. Maybe they use other battery chemistry, not sure. I thought they used NCR 21700A.

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6 hours ago, RagingGrandpa said:

-20°C is the manufacturer-specified temperature limit, so please avoid going colder.

https://www.batteryspace.com/prod-specs/11514.pdf
 

Yes.

Exposure to fog and condensation for long durations is a real hazard.

This is why "store outside in a garage on cement" isn't real practical advice for many people in the Northern Hemisphere...

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  • 3 weeks later...
Just now, /Dev/Null said:

Keep it away from anything flamabale - many houses ar made of wood.  No way to keep it 3m from anything not-wood/fabric/carpets

Then at least try? IMO that's the only real protection, everything else is mostly useless or unpractical.
If I had a house made of wood, I think I'd store it on a fireproof (glass fiber) blanket, possibly covered with a second blanket.

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I'm getting my first EUC whenever its boat from China lands here in the Great White North. Battery fires are a concern both because of the damage they'd do and because I am not sure what my home insurance will do if I have a EUC fire. If I get full coverage I'm a lot less concerned. If I get denied coverage that would be expensive. I've found a few EUC/Fire/Insurance related posts so I am working my way through those.

My "man cave" is a detached studio office with a single car garage attached. I've got a fire station very close on a direct route. So a fire would likely only damage my office and perhaps the garage. I suspect the fire department would be here within 3 mins of calling 911 so hopefully damage would be limited.

I'm on the west coast of Canada so during most of the prime riding season temps will be +10 to + 25 deg C. It does get colder in peak winter, but I doubt I'll be riding much then and it does get warmer say up to 30 deg C a few times in the summer, but for very limited times. 

I'm a morning person so I'll frequently want to head out at dawn or even pre-dawn with lights. That means charging the previous day or overnight. It sounds like overnight is a bad idea as I'd be leaving the wheel unattended. So I guess charging the day before when I can be around to monitor it is the way to go. I'll have to decide if I am worried enough about a fire to run an extension cord and charge the EUC outside or if I'll charge in my office and just keep an eye on it. 

I'm of the mind if a fire does start indoors I'm just going to call 911 and not risk inhaling toxic smoke in a small enclosed area.

I don't have a smoke detector in my man cave. I'll go grab one and install it. My property is small enough I should be able to hear it go off even if I step away to the house for a bit while the EUC is charging.

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You have to be comfortable with the risk, but at those temperatures as long as you keep the wheel dry I wouldn’t be too concerned about charging it unattended. During riding season you could probably charge it in a garden shed (no fertilizer near it though!) if you didn’t want to have any risk to the cave.

Def get the smoke detector.

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