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After waiting several months I finally got my V11 but despite several days of practice i just cannot seem to get the hang on it. Considering how hard they are to get right now i was curious what people would be willing to pay to buy mine if i sold it rather than keep trying to learn it. What do you think?

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You're right about that suspension trick - One issue I've had is that it rides so high my center of gravity is high and that's just making it harder to balance on. I've been practicing on it every day but I'm doing a hell of a number on my wrists, ankles, basically my whole body has bruises covering it now lol.

I would like to learn it but I learned to use an electric skateboard in about 2 days so struggling with this thing after 2 weeks is increasingly frustrating.

The main issue I feel is that's it's just so damn heavy that as soon as it get's "janky" to one side i just can't correct the lean, or i overcorrect and blam, there i am on the pavement again.

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Yeah the V11 is not the easiest to learn on and it is very heavy - but it will be worth it if you push on.

Lower your tire psi immediately - it makes a big difference.  Also put some padding on the wheel, also wear padding on your knees/legs while you learn - cloth knee pads worn facing the wheel helped me master the V11 when my legs were getting beat up those first few days (and I already knew how to ride). It is not supposed to be easy.

With all that said, I think if you sell you can probably get pretty close to what you paid if it's in good shape, there is a waiting list for V11's and demand is still higher then supply.

 

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Everybody has said everything. I am going to pile on and say "keep the faith" for a couple more weeks. It should begin to happen for you soon. Once you roll 50 feet ... you are hooked!

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I learned to ride on my V10 which unknowing at the time was probably the perfect starter wheel for me. I really wanted to get a V11 as my first wheel but didn't want to wait a few months to get one so I went with the V10. Hearing your frustration with the V11 makes me think I probably would have felt the same way only angrier if I did not get riding right away after plunking down close to $3K on wheel. I also had some thigh bruises and sore ankles learning as well but they went away once I learned the proper riding stance and didn't slam my legs into the wheel getting on and off. I did have a nice soft tire to start out with the first couple of days but found that a firmer tire was easier for me especially turning. I also lowered the speed limit all the way down to 12 mph in case I had to bailout and run. I would keep at it because it is very rewarding once you get that balance and take off down the road wobble free. Keep at it and you'll be floating in no time.  

Edited by Sludog
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I absolutely agree, keep it and keep on it.

 But don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Watch this EUCO learning video CLOSELY, and follow the practicing steps with as much detail as you can. Doing so will seriously cut down the time it takes for you to advance and for riding to “click”.

 

Edited by mrelwood
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a long handicap ramp was a godsend for me. public schools often have a set of these and often empty on weekends or evenings. I used the rails to help me mount and at least get a feel of the motor starting and stopping and rolling more than 6' at a time.  I went up the ramp and practiced stopping and getting my leg off. Then turning around and going down and repeat. Then I would try to mount and when frustrating I stopped and just continued my 20' rides up and down the ramp.  Then one day, I decided to ride off the ramp and went down the parking lot. Tried mounting again and still needed help so I used a nearby sign post in the parking lot. I mounted and rode clumsily all over the open parking lot.  It was the funnest hour ever.  I wasn't consistent but I could stay on and just keep going. At that point I gave mounting a good hour and it just kept getting tighter and better as I rode in a circle and tried to hit random patterns in the parking lot.  

when mounting stage, I found walking the wheel with one leg on the pedal and one leg on the ground helped tremendously at getting a locked in feel and control of the wheel. Basically skip along or just baby step it and then take longer and longer strides. 

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@Pale Rider I know it seems impossible right now. But I encouraged you to keep going for it.

Take short sessions (I could only handle 10-15min at each training session) take a break and if you have the option to record your training review those in between. Doing this helped me a lot by seeing small steps of progress until it finally clicked for me. This is how most of us expireanced the learning process. I can't explain why it just is this way. 

I would also suggest compare this to a bike. If you are riding it at 1-2 kmh it is very hard once it is at 5-10kmh it becomes easier. So some speed is your friend but not to much. 

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I have been thinking about learning to ride on a V11 and from the point of view not riding EUC before. 

I think this is part of why Inmotion labeled tge V11 for "Pro".  Some might confused it for extreme but I don't see it like that. 

Part of learning to ride an EUC is getting the confident to step up, catch the balance and set off in control (these last 2 steps merge into one) and later come to a stop and dismounting in control. 

With the V11 you have higher pedals so to step up is a bit "harder" as the confidence level takes much more practice initially. Normally I would recommend learning to control the wheel with one leg spinning around yourself. But in the V11 case to ease up an get confident I would find a long wall or hallway to go back and forth to get a feel of the wheel. Or have someone to hold on to their shoulder (this is both good and bad. The person you lean on to need to be able to support you if you are about to fall off which can be hard if it comes at a surprise). 

When I learned to ride there were snow outside. So my buildings basement was my training grounds. After a while I felt I were trapped as I could not catch my balance without touching the wall. So I had to continue outside. To give you an idea have a look at this:

This is one of my first rides outside:

Some time later I rode to work (1800m in traffic):

You might know me yet. But my reason to ride were to get about and train my body. I have different rheumatic conditions so I were like a frozen fish finger from where I get out if bed at 7am until 12am or2pm then I manage to get my knee working but now the muscles are too soft as my knee is pulled apart by collection of fluid due to inflation. 

Yet I learned to ride and overcome the lag of ability my body started out at. It is not easy for me to step up as it strain my knee on the V11. But once I get up I fly about 😁 almost like an albatros. Take off and landings are not my strongest suit 😉

This might not be best video quality. But the audio tell you what you can get to do soon. 

I now have about 7500km total on EUC 950ish km on my V11. 

I hope this might help others too to learn to ride. I personally would not start out on a V11 but it is not the same as it can't be done learning on it. But I doubt it will be easier in V11 as first EUC due to the above. 

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How old are you Pale Rider, if you don't mind my asking? Age is not necessarily a barrier. But in most cases, the older you are, the harder it is to pick something up. If you are 60 or 70 or younger in good physical/mental condition, I say don't give up. But if you are higher up in 80s and 90s and not in good physical/mental condition, I say maybe consider another kind of thrills. Sometimes all of us have to face reality as it is.

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Obviously, the general consensus is to hang in there and I third the notion. Patience is very important, among other things it'll keep you from thinking your skills are more advanced than they are and ending poorly. But if you really really do need somebody to make you a deal that amounts to out and out theft, I'm just up the road and can be in the car in minutes. :whistling:

Edited by Tawpie
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Not sure if this was mentioned in above posts but I’d recommend learning on grass. Less bruises and less wheel damage results in less worry/more confidence at falling. The irregular surface might seem more difficult than smooth asphalt but it speeds up learning having to correct your positioning and find your centre of gravity over and over again. Might not work for everyone but did for me. Hope that helps 😬

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It took me two weeks of riding in the house while using the walls. Now, I'm thinking of upgrading. Especially, when I brought my wheel I told myself I'm not going to upgrade.

New EUC rider in my group had a V11 as his first wheel... but he learned on borrowed non-suspension wheels V8 to MSX for the duration of waiting to get his wheel.

He said, it would be hard if he had to learn from only a suspension wheel because of the height.

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