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Riding Sherman with 2° Forward Pedal Tilt


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Playing around with the pedal tilt feature, tilting them forward enables faster acceleration and capability to achieve higher speeds.

Here's a video riding the Sherman with a 2° forward pedal tilt:

 

 

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Its amazing how I keep hearing opposite opinions on this. Rear tilt seems to assist me, forward tilt assists you. I need to play with it more, as I still am not sure what to think of the adjusmtents..

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21 minutes ago, ShanesPlanet said:

Its amazing how I keep hearing opposite opinions on this. Rear tilt seems to assist me, forward tilt assists you. I need to play with it more, as I still am not sure what to think of the adjusmtents..

See I think forward tilt helps with higher speed cruising because your leaned into the wind with straight feet. Also I do run medium mode so there is some swing.

Edited by Resko727
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I raise all of my wheel's pedals by 2-3 degrees. I like to be able to ride on the balls of my feet (or a single foot) when accelerating and climbing. Bites me in rear when I am descending on the V11 though (feels like I am going to fall off of the back of the wheel), otherwise it works well with the Sherman and MSP across all terrain.

Edited by gon2fast
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For me flat pedals are the way to go, best of both worlds both acceleration and breaking and I wouldn't want angled pedals on off-road terrain. 😁

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Seems to me that pedal tilt preferences and benefits may be related in some large part to ankle mobility (dorsiflexion). After many ankle sprains when I was younger, my right ankle really stiff. Forward pedal tilt gives me better range of motion. Kinda like how weightlifting shoes with heel lifts allow for deeper squat. Maybe just me....

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Feels like my foot will slide off forward with the front tilted down. I had to tilt fronts up 1 degree on both my wheels. Felt like it gave me a more flatter pedal while still accelerating to ride one footed flat and other on ball of foot, continuously switching sides to ride flat footed

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6 minutes ago, Dreygun said:

Feels like my foot will slide off forward with the front tilted down. I had to tilt fronts up 1 degree on both my wheels. Felt like it gave me a more flatter pedal while still accelerating to ride one footed flat and other on ball of foot, continuously switching sides to ride flat footed

Mine feels same. aside from my SHOE scraping in turns, high speed bumps tend to have my feet bounce forward on the plates while leaning, as the pedals are in fact a forward slope.. Rear tilt minimizes both issues. Of course, Im still assuming I'm just doing it all wrong.  I am wondering if a severe rear tilt will in fact make my feet compress into the pedals during bumps, rather than slip forward? I guess toe pads would help, but thats dependant on precise foot location too. U-stride seems to stay atop his at speed with no pads, so Im taking ques from his style and trying to figure it out.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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As a safety feature, I always ride with 1 - 4 degree tilt back. 1 for street 4 for trails... this causes most of your lower mass to be positioned behind the center of the wheel. I have come close to a cut out several times as I feel the peddle slowly or quickly dipping forward. When this happens, you simply straighten you knees (causing you to lean back naturally) and make yourself lighter using the same method of hopping to adjust your stance or curb jump. 

Hope this helps someone!

Most people don't like to live on the edge of these systems, but I like to learn its limits to prevent a fall. I believe this is what separates a good rider from great. 

To practice this, battery should be at 35-50% and tilt set to 5+ degrees... from here, overpower the wheel and feel the peddles begin to "dip forward" (straighten since you're back 5 degrees). Finally straighten kneeslil hop, and lean back at the same time.

 

Please don't try this if you are not comfortable with your wheel. This is definitely and advanced skill, but has saved me multiple times from unexpected overcurrent situations. 

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8 minutes ago, EUC_Ali said:

overpower the wheel and feel the <pedals> begin to "dip forward"

What?!
With a fullsize EUC like 16x !?

What type of surface and speed were you riding, that permits controlled overlean?

I think the scenarios for overlean are: low speed high torque using powerpads; loss of traction; or max speed...
Did you intentionally go out with your 16x and try to make it dip at 25mph?

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32 minutes ago, RagingGrandpa said:

What?!
With a fullsize EUC like 16x !?

What type of surface and speed were you riding, that permits controlled overlean?

I think the scenarios for overlean are: low speed high torque using powerpads; loss of traction; or max speed...
Did you intentionally go out with your 16x and try to make it dip at 25mph?

Yes, you don't need pads to overcurrent and make it dip at 45% battery... just have to commit and control on pavement. This has happened to me several times around 28mph and I've recovered thanks to practicing this technique at lower speeds. I'd say 90% of people would have fallen in my situations, but for the 10% that are willing to invest the time and learn a hard technique, it will save them bumps, bruises, and money.

 Again, I can't emphasize enough that you need to be an advanced rider. to put it into perspective. I can ride MTB trains, Jump 5+ step stairs, ride down stairs, ride backwards at 30mph, etc... these are all prerequisites to this technique... If you can do these comfortably, then I would say you're ready. If you are not confident in any of these, then I'd keep practicing as this could be the last trick you try. 

No I am not the best rider in the world, or even close, but I do understand that this is a high risk technique that shouldn't be attempted by a casual rider... 200% worth learning though as it is a last resort before falling. 

 

I think I have a strong understanding of this technique from the onewheel as the nose would dive and you'd quickly try to counteract this by throwing your butt back... some have little fangs(wheel) to prevent a nosedive/give you a chance to lean back as they allow you to ride with the little wheels preventing the front bumper from catching... But I learned the hard way after several failed attempts as I didn't have these preventative nosedive wheels (fangs). 

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1 hour ago, EUC_Ali said:

you don't need pads
make it dip at 45% battery
on pavement

I'd say 90% of people would have fallen

Scary stuff. Get it wrong and it's a violent crash.

If you want to learn to recover from overlean, why not do it in a safer environment?
You can get all that dip-practice you're interested in, but in a place where if you fall, it's harmless.

Such as: acceleration at <5mph on low-grip surfaces like:

  • Wet grass incline
  • Snow/ice
  • Mud

I would never recommend intentionally attempting overlean on pavement, especially with faster wheels than 16x (like Sherman!!). Nasty crashes await.

 

Edited by RagingGrandpa
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