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Everything someone should know before riding an EUC


CharlesRomer

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Hey Guys

Im wondering what someone should know before/during riding an EUC.

What are some gadgets that are super helpful or some trick that's really great or a waterproof case, maybe a specific mudguard. Really anything. 

Appreciate it!!

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3 hours ago, RockyTop said:

After getting an EUC and learning to ride, walking becomes barbaric and pointless. :angry:

I relate SOO much!

I rode my v5f everywhere I went even it was 30 secs of walking. Then I popped the tire and had to wait like a week. It was honestly the hardest week of my life walking felt sooo weird. Ik it may be lazy but this is what I've come to now.

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3 hours ago, mrelwood said:

Contender for the widest subject... :P

The answers and tips will be very different, as we learn with different methods and have a different starting point. You’ll have to pick and choose which feel relevant to you.

1) Protective gear. There are many aspects of riding that increase the risk of falling, such as a completely new type of transport, adrenaline and endorphins causing misjudgment, and being a new vehicle for others. Others don’t know how fast and nimble you are on an EUC, so they may react unpredictably. Be considerate of others, yield to everybody, and always look ahead.

2) YouTube. While a marvelous source for tips and guides, it is not moderated in any way, so some of the tips may not be good. I think the learning guide by EUCO is a great one though, as it is the only one I’ve seen that prepares for advanced techniques right from the start.

3) Maintenance. While there is very little to maintenance on an EUC, lack of doing so is more costly than on other vehicles. Be sure to check the tire pressure every few weeks, and if you encounter ANY new or strange behavior or sounds, investigate (or ask the forum) until you can be sure that the wheel is still safe to ride!

4) Battery. The most costly single element of an EUC. Every few chargers charge to full and leave the wheel in the charger for a few hours for the BMS to be able to balance the cells. Every now and then check your wheel’s voltage from the app after a full charge. If it starts getting lower, you need to act quick or the battery will fail.

5) Scan the ground continuously. You will learn how the wheel reacts to bumps, potholes and rails, but you do need to be prepared for each. (Unless you ride on the V11... :D)

6) Have fun! While there’s a lot to learn in a completely new type of transport, it will all fall into place soon enough. Don’t stress over it, and enjoy the ride!

Exactly what I was looking for THX. 

Ive actually been riding EUCs for 1 year now and have owned 2 inmotion EUCs, Ik the basics but was wondering if there was some really cool attachment or gadget that just made riding an EUC even more fun/enjoyable/cool.

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11 hours ago, RockyTop said:

After getting an EUC and learning to ride, walking becomes barbaric and pointless. :angry:

It's funny you say that, I took my wheel down to the park and rode for an hour or so and after my ride, I decided to walk a few laps around the track they have there, I felt like I was 3 feet tall and was getting nowhere, I walked a lap and said "screw this" and got back on my wheel:)

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step one... buy an euc.

step two...keep practicing until you get hurt or figure it out.

step three... ignore the pussies that think you need more invested in gear than you do your home

step four... realize that shanesplanet is an idiot and move on to a different list.

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I've got four tangential ones that don't get mentioned often enough:

  • Riding parallel or at a shallow angle to a crack/seam/rut/rail/height-change/etc can 'suck in' your tire (sometimes called 'tram-lining') and cause crashes. Avoid riding parallel to such, or if approaching to cross at a shallow angle swerve wide to cross it more head-on/perpendicular.
  • 'Painted' lines/symbols on the road are now often some kind of material stuck on top of the road surface that is slightly raised (rather than merely flat paint), and can be responsible for/cause the aforementioned 'tram-lining' (by riding on/over such a line parallel or near parallel to it).
  • Aforementioned lines/symbols on the road can also be highly slippery when wet, so avoid braking or accelerating aggressively on it.
  • The grain/fiber pattern in carpet can make it extremely difficult to ride on by causing the wheel to swerve back and forth on its own. Avoid riding on carpet until a much more experienced/advanced rider, and especially do not try learning on carpet (in your home or apartment hallway or something).
Edited by AtlasP
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17 minutes ago, AtlasP said:

I've got three tangential ones that don't get mentioned often enough:

  • Riding parallel or at a shallow angle to a crack/seam/rut/rail/height-change/etc can 'suck in' your tire (sometimes called 'tram-lining') and cause crashes. Avoid riding parallel to such, or if approaching at a shallow angle swerve wide to hit/cross it more head-on/perpendicular.
  • 'Painted' lines/symbols on the road are now often some kind of material applied to the road that is slightly raised, and can be responsible for/cause the aforementioned 'tram-lining' (by riding on/over such a line parallel or near parallel to it).
  • Aforementioned lines/symbols on the road can also be highly slippery when wet, so avoid braking or accelerating aggressively on it.

Great info @AtlasP basically, treat it like a motorcycle. Same applies for those wide depressions in roads. Either take chances in the middle with oil buildup, or ride the depression and be ready for it to tram along. I wonder if taking a motorycyle safety class would be a logical step for those so inclined? The posturing in turns at high speed is VERY similar to the required setup for sport bike riding.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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12 hours ago, ShanesPlanet said:

Great info @AtlasP basically, treat it like a motorcycle. Same applies for those wide depressions in roads. Either take chances in the middle with oil buildup, or ride the depression and be ready for it to tram along. I wonder if taking a motorycyle safety class would be a logical step for those so inclined? The posturing in turns at high speed is VERY similar to the required setup for sport bike riding.

I have an M class license here (I ride an FJR 1300) as well as 10 years of motorcycle riding experience (probably about 65000km).  I use those skills all the time & find I use bodyweight to turn much more on my (heavy) Nik+ than my V10.  I also use the "look where you want to go" when turning just like a motorcycle.  I really think riding an EUC is kind of like a cross between motorcycling  skiing.

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On 10/3/2020 at 11:08 AM, CharlesRomer said:

I relate SOO much!

I rode my v5f everywhere I went even it was 30 secs of walking. Then I popped the tire and had to wait like a week. It was honestly the hardest week of my life walking felt sooo weird. Ik it may be lazy but this is what I've come to now.

Its just an effort to speed ratio thing.  For so little effort you can glide along at 15 mph on an euc.  For little effort you go 2 mph walking, or for extreme effort you get 12 mph running lol

And its just so convenient to get on and off.  In a car you.must sit down comfort yourself, put on a seatbelt, check mirrors, back out of your spot.  Euc you just, step up and go!!

 

My tip for you, if you plan to ride 20+ mph get yourself some sunglasses or goggles.  At slower speed they are not necessary but as you get moving even tiny pieces of dust become bothersome.  

 

Edited by GoGeorgeGo
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27 minutes ago, GoGeorgeGo said:

Its just an effort to speed ratio thing.  For so little effort you can glide along at 15 mph on an euc.  For little effort you go 2 mph walking, or for extreme effort you get 12 mph running lol

And its just so convenient to get on and off.  In a car you.must sit down comfort yourself, put on a seatbelt, check mirrors, back out of your spot.  Euc you just, step up and go!!

 

My tip for you, if you plan to ride 20+ mph get yourself some sunglasses or goggles.  At slower speed they are not necessary but as you get moving even tiny pieces of dust become bothersome.  

 

EUCs are the best thing ever. 

Nice tip thx

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2 hours ago, GothamMike said:

Full Face Helmet

Wrist Guards

Knee pads

Elbow or full Upper Body pads

You will fall, pads let you get up and keep riding.

100%

When I first got my EUC, my protective gear was being shipped and wouldn't arrive until a week after the actual wheel arrived.

So, as all of us can imagine, I couldn't wait, and learning to mount was "safe" enough I felt, in the comfort of my own home (I have a large living room).

After a few good sessions over the next few days, I was brave enough to take it outside on an empty basketball court to try some simple point A-B's you know, just to try and move with the damn thing, after I was able to successfully mount. I figured "eh, I'm not really gonna be riding this thing, I just wanna slowly go a few feet in a straight line, whats the harm?"

Well, we can guess what happened next:

Even going literally at a snails pace, my wheel spun out from under me, as I didn't know how to control my balance yet, and it was enough to where it 'pushed' me off and I couldn't catch my fall, but instead my left knee and wrist took the brunt of it. I ended up with a decent abrasion on my knee and wrist. It wasnt bad at all, honestly, but left me bleeding, ended my session abruptly, and 3-4 weeks later my knee is barely healed.

After that small tumble, even going that slow, it was enough for me to pump the brakes and just wait for my protective gear to come in before I hopped back on hahaha.

Respect the wheel.

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50 minutes ago, mploy1515 said:

100%

When I first got my EUC, my protective gear was being shipped and wouldn't arrive until a week after the actual wheel arrived.

So, as all of us can imagine, I couldn't wait, and learning to mount was "safe" enough I felt, in the comfort of my own home (I have a large living room).

After a few good sessions over the next few days, I was brave enough to take it outside on an empty basketball court to try some simple point A-B's you know, just to try and move with the damn thing, after I was able to successfully mount. I figured "eh, I'm not really gonna be riding this thing, I just wanna slowly go a few feet in a straight line, whats the harm?"

Well, we can guess what happened next:

Even going literally at a snails pace, my wheel spun out from under me, as I didn't know how to control my balance yet, and it was enough to where it 'pushed' me off and I couldn't catch my fall, but instead my left knee and wrist took the brunt of it. I ended up with a decent abrasion on my knee and wrist. It wasnt bad at all, honestly, but left me bleeding, ended my session abruptly, and 3-4 weeks later my knee is barely healed.

After that small tumble, even going that slow, it was enough for me to pump the brakes and just wait for my protective gear to come in before I hopped back on hahaha.

Respect the wheel.

Ironic. I waited for my wheel's protective cover to arrive, before hitting asphalt. I had a basement of gear i rarely wear and definitely not for learning (still do), but I worried for the wheel.  Tuck those wrists in, thats what broken collar bones are for. To be fair, my worst injuries tend to happen at slower speeds.  I couldnt fathom the amount of gear needed for some people to actualy try a VERY dangerous activity. I guess they wouldnt.  @GoGeorgeGo  did hint on the ONE piece of safety gear i try to always wear. Sunglasses! Wind at +20mph dries out the eyes. Bugs arent so bad as 1 bug=1 eye, but that wind eats both. Of course, Im part vampire and sunglasses are safety gear for me anytime Im in the sun. Having a lit cigarette is a big safety item, as it keeps some people from rampantly attacking others. I suppose the take from all of this for someone to know....

Some people feel like a lot of protection gear is required, some don't. Knowing which to choose is something I prefer to think is individualized and it's not neccessarily something anyone could know for anyone else.  Its good to know that if you want a safe activity that is unlikely to hurt you..... best be moving along as you can only fool yourself or cheat the cards for so many miles.

Edited by ShanesPlanet
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On 10/3/2020 at 12:22 PM, CharlesRomer said:

Hey Guys

Im wondering what someone should know before/during riding an EUC.

What are some gadgets that are super helpful or some trick that's really great or a waterproof case, maybe a specific mudguard. Really anything. 

Appreciate it!!

#1 Get an EUC. I bought a KS 16X without knowing anything at all about these things besides watched gazillions of YT videos. Some about 'how to'. It looked cool.
#2 I bought one in November. Started to 'learn' in February, due lack of time. After 1 hour and 15 minutes I was thinking.... wtf is this S**t, and why I can not even get a clue`?
#3 something 15 minutes later it 'clicked'. I could go straight line. I continued. I passed 2 big boulders at a gravel bicycle path. I went on. At the end of the path I was realizing... hmm.. I do not know how to stop? wth..  I leaned towards the grass and somewhat made a semi crash / ugly dismount. WOW! I went to a pole and went back. Did the same route 4 more times.

#4 Day after. I am an EUC rider!!!! Woohoo!.. I crashed at those boulders. Hurt me as hell. Lower leg jacked up a wound, and got the wrist hurt. I did not have any gear at all. :(

#5. I ordered the full gear and some. Cost me some $, but I thought it was ok. Meanwhile I started to commute to work. Turning was a real mess. I have learned to stop and dismount after 4 days. Alarm at 18kph, and tilt back at 20.
#6. Gear arrived a bit more than a week later. My speed was now set to 26kph alarm and tilt back at 28. I Geared up.

#7. 3weeks later I crashed. I tried to move my right foot because it was a bit off. I lifted the foot and tried to move it forward. Wobble. The sound of the crash is still in my mind. Cracked the shell of the 16X. (still cracked after 3500km) I broke 2 fingers. Healed. Broke again, healed, and after 3rd time I got surgery. Somewhat ok today though. 
#8. Done 4500-5000km total for today on my EUC's. (yes.. I bought 2 more) Still of today I'm thinking.. Why is there not any good, 'safe' gear to get? hmm.. It will be a question for many to debate on for ages. For me? Well, if I keep the speed down to reasonable levels today. But, not really true because when the 'evil' get in the mind, you break the 70+ beep level on a Sherman in the middle of a night on a country road, and still pushing it on the beeps until it start to wave a bit back and forth... Safe or not? Probable just stupid. Some of us just go that way. Just don't go that direction, you will regret it. I was lucky.

Keep your mind clear and get the gear that protect your joints all over the body and keep the speed down, and your fine. If not?... You get hurt. Maybe you will anyway. Ask any EUC rider if they got hurt. Those who haven't maybe had their mind sane, and been smart enough not to stress the limits.

Good luck, be careful and be safe out there. :P

Gadgets? I got a Motorcycle headset. Bluetooth to my phone. Listening to music and I can talk on phone handsfree. It have a HD cam that records everything in loop. If I hit my helmet hard enough its an 'accident' and I get that sequence -15 seconds and +15 seconds saved. I can take pictures on the fly. If any of my buddies has the same system that is compatible, we can connect and talk freely even we do not see each other or are few hundred meters away. Like walkie talkie. Best gadget ever! Highly recommended on long trips or blasting in the city!!!!
Lights, and reflexes for night ride is also big plus. Mirror mount at wrist or helmet another super thing. App for anything related bicycling paths, or public WC might be another. List is imaginably endless if you're riding a lot. :)

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by MikieSWE
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