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Take off your shoes and take a ballet barre class online. It will strengthen your feet, ankles, calves, knees and legs. all you need is a pair of socks. 

Beginner Ballet Barre

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I alternate lifting my heal on one side and toe on the other when I start to get cramps/ numbness. This way you can maintain your speed and ride. 

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Disclaimer: I’m no medical expert, so take the following info as what it is, that of a layman in the age of google.

A common injury for runners and people standing a lot is Plantar Fasciitis, which (as I understand it) is pain in the foot arch and/or heel because of repetetive stress of the ligament stretching from the heel bone out to the toes.

From what I understand, there can be many causes, but I believe people with a forward leaning posture tends to be more at risk because of more strain on the ligament from the calves. So, I would assume EUC riders as a group are high risk for this.

I struggle with plantar fasciitis because of my running and haven’t been able to get rid of it, even after years of trying. So I would strongly suggest being careful and patient when dealing with foot pain from riding EUCs. Take several days of rest the minute something feels wrong, or you might risk it not going away.

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Some EUCs have seats...consider that not for long-term seated riding, but a break once in a while.

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On 7/4/2020 at 6:14 PM, Kai Drange said:

I struggle with plantar fasciitis because of my running and haven’t been able to get rid of it, even after years of trying.

I had it for about a year. After I started riding EUC's it got a little bit worse at first, but then disappeared completely.

So nice to wake up in the morning and walk down the stairs pain-free !

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1 hour ago, Tazarinho said:
On 7/4/2020 at 6:14 PM, Kai Drange said:

I struggle with plantar fasciitis because of my running and haven’t been able to get rid of it, even after years of trying.

I had it for about a year. After I started riding EUC's it got a little bit worse at first, but then disappeared completely.

Glad to hear! I hope I will have the same experience. I will be careful now at first, though. I don’t want to risk it getting worse.

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I am back after a summer of testing to report:

#1.   I definitely have less foot cramps and foot fatigue if I wear tightly laced combat style boots, this seems to be best footwear for riding EUC: 

image.png.fdec8c64de9d72d44363796758c91c0b.png

#2.   I believe the potassium supplements that I've been taking help reduce foot cramps as well (alternatively just eat more bananas).

#3.   Lastly it is worth mentioning the obvious: the more you ride the more tolerance you have to foot fatigue and cramps.

 

 

 

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I'm new and also experience foot cramps. I've found that trying to ride in a straight line makes it worse. If I keep rolling, changing my weight from side to side and carving it helps. I have also found that using power pads and leaning the wheel forward with the pad and my shins while trying to keep my feet relaxed and not engaged also gives them a break.

There are times when I just need to use my feet, like when doing ankle turns, but if I keep mixing my riding up, shifting my weight and using the pads to lean the wheel forward rather than my feet things are a lot better.

Edited by UniMe

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Try using power pads if you haven't already. My feet would cramp up within a couple of miles and I tried everything. Thick soles, thin soles, relaxing while riding, carving more, shifting my weight around, wiggling my toes, positioning my feet further forward on the pedals, getting larger pedals, frequent stretching, and simply riding more. But after 200 miles and no improvement, I asked this same question and my buddy recommended power pads and they eliminated all cramping for me!! Being able to accelerate with forward motion using your shins relieves your feet from having to accelerate by applying downward pressure. 

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15 hours ago, Tryptych said:

I am back after a summer of testing to report:

#1.   I definitely have less foot cramps and foot fatigue if I wear tightly laced combat style boots, this seems to be best footwear for riding EUC: 

image.png.fdec8c64de9d72d44363796758c91c0b.png

 

 

Did you buy the side zip version of those boots or the regular one? Side zipper seems convenient to get in/out of the boot but I fear that they may dig into your feet when pressed against the side of the EUC. 

Edited by Fadkar

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2 hours ago, Fadkar said:

Try using power pads if you haven't already. My feet would cramp up within a couple of miles and I tried everything. Thick soles, thin soles, relaxing while riding, carving more, shifting my weight around, wiggling my toes, positioning my feet further forward on the pedals, getting larger pedals, frequent stretching, and simply riding more. But after 200 miles and no improvement, I asked this same question and my buddy recommended power pads and they eliminated all cramping for me!! Being able to accelerate with forward motion using your shins relieves your feet from having to accelerate by applying downward pressure. 

Yeah I've used power pads and can see how they might change the situation for someone as they tend to change the way you ride. Personally I don't notice a difference in foot fatigue due to having pads on/off.

 

2 hours ago, Fadkar said:

Did you buy the side zip version of those boots or the regular one? Side zipper seems convenient to get in/out of the boot but I fear that they may dig into your feet when pressed against the side of the EUC. 

That was just a random photo to show the type of boots I was talking about, I don't own those exact ones.

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I have a couple pair of really good hiking boots and do feel a lot more secure wearing them. I don't like the heel lift though... so I tend to stick with a pair of Oboz approach shoes. They have about 5 mill of heel lift, lace right down to the toe so I can do slow, steep turns without any chance of my foot slipping around in the shoe. They also have a super sticky sole which is beyond gripy on the sandpaper foot pads. Stupid Oboz... they stopped making them.

I think the good lacing system also helps with the foot cramps. I started with a shoe that let my foot slip around a bit and found I was often fighting the movement by trying to grip the bottom of the shoe with my feet.

So, I was thinking this 'zero drop' hiking boot might be the solution. My wife has pair and I have several other shoes from them that work really well. This boot has a big and open toe box but laces quite well across the forefoot and ankle -- lots of room to wiggle your toes but hopefully still stable. my other shoes from them have a really functional heel lock and it's impossible (really, it's just not possible) to get the shoe off without unlacing it.

https://www.vivobarefoot.com/rw/mens/outdoor/tracker-fg-mens?colour=Dark+Brown

Edited by UniMe

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