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Ed in San Diego

I finally figured out how to ride my first EUC two days after getting it! So happy!

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Posted (edited)

 

26 minutes ago, Ed in San Diego said:

Lean forward a lot to move forward; don't try to put weight on toes

awesome you are already getting it. Im not so sure about lean forward a lot but not on the toes? I like to use the balls of my feet and grab the wheel or bend in a manner that mitigates having to lean forward more. Staying off the toes is VERY solid advice. I stand more forward on the pedals at speed, so its not an option anyhow. Shifting weight rather than leaning more, keeps that forehead off the pavement when pushing uphill into the wind at 28mph. I can typically keep similar posture at 10mph as I do near 30mph, I just grab with the legs and push the hips forward while keeping a fairly central stance. My foot placement changes depending on intent/needs. Foot placement is VERY relevant for my ride styles. Hi-speed sweepers tend to find me in offset placement. Great post for sure, it seemed to have come easily for you! Watch out for overconfidence, I'm still waiting for it to teach me a lesson.

Edited by ShanesPlanet

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Posted (edited)

What I meant was, previously I'd been standing upright and basically trying to press down on the front of the pegs with the ball of my foot, which barely worked. Simply shifting my weight by leaning worked significantly better and allowed me to propel forward. Maybe with experience I can do it without so much of a lean, but as a beginner this seems to be the way to do it.

Edited by Ed in San Diego

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@Ed in San Diego  :thumbup: Welcome to the addiction!!  ............. and a new freedom of movement. 

Amazingly, just when you think that you have stopped learning your skills continue to improve. The wheel eventually becomes an extension of your legs.  

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I did another session yesterday evening and one earlier today. I still struggle to start it on level ground (succeeding eventually after numerous attempts) but finally I figured out I didn't have the wheel at the correct angle before lifting my other foot. Sometimes it would be too upright, resulting in a lean to the right after I mount it followed by a sudden right turn I couldn't correct for well enough, or it would be inclined too far to the left, so after mounting it would turn left suddenly. I need to get the angle correct and then I can ride it. I was able to successfully mount and ride a couple of times after I realized that.

I did repeatedly experience a wobble today at around 10 mph. Don't know if it's the wheel or me. Have trouble trying to eliminate it.

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I've had a similarly good experience getting up and running pretty quickly.  I'm on day 4 and am probably feeling way too comfortable for my own good 

I have found that mounting the wheel is WAY easier using the skating method if I keep my dominant leg (the one on the EUC) nice and bent while kicking myself up to speed.  It makes your shin line up across the wheel at a diagonal which gives you support on two axis.  It also makes it much easier to put your kicking leg right next to your pedal as opposed to behind it.  I found that if I made my dominant leg straight during mounting, that it tended to push my kicking leg behind me which in turn made balancing a real pain and also was just an exhausting pose to maintain.  Sounds like you had a similar experience.   In two days using the bent leg method I am able to mount smoothly with just one big smooth push and then can pull my kicking leg right up onto the pedal in one motion.  

As far as foot placement goes...I found this mattered a lot for me.  I have big feet (size 14 US) that hang off the pedal in every direction.  I found that centering the pedal between my heel and ball of my foot was necessary for maintaining even balance.  

Wobble hasn't plagued me too much, but I attribute this to my practice on a OneWheel first.  I find that whenever I tense my feet or legs I am far more likely to start wobbling.  If I relax my feet and settle in, wobble almost always disappears.  It also helps to do some light carving.  I think that whenever your feet are fighting each other you are likely to start the wobble.  Relaxing and/or carving stops the in-fighting.  

 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for your advice, I will try ensuring my right leg is bent when doing the skating method, which I try to avoid but sometimes have to resort to.

It's now been a week since I got my EUC. At this point I still sometimes struggle to mount it, but I suspect that when I try to bring my left (off) foot up, I'm actually maintaining the lean to the left until both feet are on and then hastily trying to correct the balance. I think I need to practice gradually making the wheel upright as I bring the left foot up and onto it. I do sometimes manage a zero-speed mount and go, which is what I want because I feel I have much more control than with a skating method.

I read somewhere that making the legs straight is one good way to fix wobbles, so I make sure to do that whenever I feel a wobble coming and it always works. It's hard to get used to though because it seems counter-intuitive.

Turns are coming more naturally; I do sometimes find myself getting tense after initiating a turn and reflexively pushing with the outer leg, which of course just straightens me. But turns get easier the more I do them, and I just play around with shifting my body to counter any feeling like I'm going to fall into the turn (at low speeds especially).

But I can NOT stop. Every time I try to bring it to a stop, it starts to wobble as it slows and I end up grabbing the handle and jumping off, with quite a bit of forward speed. Very inelegant and a bit painful to my knees and feet. I cannot leave the safety of parks/campuses until I can reliably and quickly stop and this skill still eludes me. That's my main frustration.

Edited by Ed in San Diego

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We used to have group rides in San Diego every month or two before COVID19, also the regular organizer @Flyboy10 is out-of-commission at the moment. Once you get a little more proficient at riding and we get a handle on the COVID situation, you should consider joining. We are on facebook and Flyboy10 has a youtube page. 

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@Ed in San Diego, I'd be happy to meet up with you to talk, ride, practice with you. I'm pretty free and flexible with my schedule except this weekend. Feel free to message me here or on Instagram @flyboyeuc if you are into that. The Facebook group is called San Diego electric unicycle. Just answer one of the questions as I'm Ed in San Diego. We should be starting group rides back up soon once parks open up. I've recently been planning longer rides but I might go back to shorter rides now that it's getting warm. I hope that shorter rides will encourage more people because it's not a huge time commitment.

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A group ride would be fun. I'm getting much better at turns and at stopping, and at very slow riding (like walking speed). I still struggle a little with mounting but have been focusing on doing it while stationary and I tend to get it by the 4th try if not earlier. Where do you guys ride?

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We ride everywhere. I try to alternate between street and off-road routes. I've got a list of maybe 8 different paths we typically take. Join the facebook group soon though as I'll be planning a short group ride later this month.

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Posted (edited)

Hi guys hope all is well. Would like to offer tips and advice to @Ed in San Diego

Basically for the "start off" approach of riding by stepping on the euc I would suggest making sure that the euc is not vertically straight up. Make sure its leaning at an angle. For instance if your right foot is on the peddle make sure the Euc is tilted slightly to the left leg, this is because when you jump on the Euc it will then flick up straight as your left foot goes on the peddle. If the Euc was already straight and then you step on, it will then over tilt to one side causing you to unbalance. Really would show a pic of what I mean but I can't upload that at the moment.

 

Also for the wobble... I found out that after 5 years of riding and 15 EUC's I own, I found out that the wobble on my KS 18XL was all down to having a slight gap between the wheel and both of my legs. When I go faster, the vibration makes the Euc go left and right between my legs, basically playing ping pong and getting faster causing me to wobble. I found out that, when both legs are touching the sides of the Euc then that no longer wobbles. Hope that helped a bit mate 😊

Edited by Neon EUC

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Very impressive. It took me about 3 weeks to finally ride. The first week of riding I felt like a cow on ice. But now I’m hitting local bike trails and ride around my neighborhood.  It is absolutely awesome.  What I gathered from my learning process is that you have to listen and test every tip you get from more experienced riders, You will use some and find others useless or even awkward, but at the end you will start to develop your own style. Main point is to be relaxed. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/11/2020 at 3:22 AM, Ed in San Diego said:

I read somewhere that making the legs straight is one good way to fix wobbles, so I make sure to do that whenever I feel a wobble coming and it always works. It's hard to get used to though because it seems counter-intuitive.

Turns are coming more naturally; I do sometimes find myself getting tense after initiating a turn and reflexively pushing with the outer leg, which of course just straightens me. But turns get easier the more I do them, and I just play around with shifting my body to counter any feeling like I'm going to fall into the turn (at low speeds especially).

But I can NOT stop. Every time I try to bring it to a stop, it starts to wobble as it slows and I end up grabbing the handle and jumping off, with quite a bit of forward speed. Very inelegant and a bit painful to my knees and feet. I cannot leave the safety of parks/campuses until I can reliably and quickly stop and this skill still eludes me. That's my main frustration.

I'll have to try the leg straight thing.  It kinda makes sense.  My feeling is that whenever my legs get a little tired that a wobble is more likely to come on (again in my mind...muscles fighting each other).  Makes sense that if you were to straighten your legs that you would be giving your quads a break.  Not sure how I feel about having straight legs on the EUC though.  Most of my balance and mobility comes from being relaxed in the knees.  I guess if people can sit on an EUC though, they can stand too :thumbup:  I'll give it a go.

One thing that helped me with turning on my EUC  was actually something that I learned when I was first figuring out how to ride my OneWheel.  The OW has a REALLY wide tire, so turning is not really intuitive (at least it wasn't for me).  Someone pointed out to me that the farther you rode on the side of your tire, the more the wheel would want to turn it that direction.  It's more like a snowboard than a skateboard.  Once I started thinking like this, I got it really quickly.  I realized I had to literally picture putting the OW on the edge of the tire.  There was a sweet spot on the edge that I could lean into and easily control my turn.   Even a few degrees off of vertical made a big difference.  Pushing farther into the sweet spot created a tighter turn as long as you stayed balanced.  The  EUC has worked the same for me.  The main difference is just that the sweet spot is much narrower on the EUC than the OW, and the height of the EUC makes dialing in the right angle a more sensitive affair.  I find that playing with subtle differences in foot pressure between my feet helps dial it in, or at higher speeds leaning the EUC against one of my legs and lightly leaning the direction I want to go....either way though, I'm always thinking about the angle of the tire.  If you practice carving long smooth turns on pavement, it helps you find that sweet spot faster.  I usually start off each ride doing a little bit of this just to bring back the muscle memory.  

Lastly, with the stopping...I've luckily not been having much trouble with this.  One suggestion that was really helpful to me was picturing using your legs to bring the EUC in front of you whenever you wanted to stop.  This worked much better mentally for me than picturing leaning backwards (which is what I was doing at first).  The farther you bring the EUC in front of you, the faster you stop.  I am practicing doing this gradually.  I began with braking really softly at first...braking super early and just bringing the EUC slightly forward and coming to a long slow stop.  I then (VERY) gradually have been bringing it forward farther and now faster as well...resulting in progressively harder braking .  I'm still not crazy aggressive with it, but I'm able to completely control myself all the way down to almost stopped before I lean slightly to one side and dismount.  Hopefully this helps!  

Edited by longjohnsally

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Thanks for the tips. At this point I can stop easily, guess I just needed practice, though I'm not so good at one-foot stops and typically have to grab the handle after stopping to keep it upright. So still not at the point where I can do stop-and-goes but I'll get there I'm sure.

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Posted (edited)

This straight leg thing is a bit concerning to me. Sure do what you have to to get the wheel under control. ..And straight legs are OK when you are learning to ride. ( just one less joint movement  to worry about)  Just to be clear, straight legs will get you in a bunch of trouble when you hit a bump. 
 

Do what you have to now. The end game solution is to learn how to carve. Once you can do that Wobbles should not be a problem. First being able to carve quickly increases your skills. second wobbles stop when you carve. I am not telling you to carve all the time. When you feel a wobble a slight change in direction stops the wobbles. :D

Edited by RockyTop

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Yeah, when I'm not on a surface I know is smooth I bend my legs slightly but I also slow down (~15 mph or less). Bent legs at higher speeds just results in immediate wobbles until I straighten them. But I've only been doing this less than three weeks.

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15 hours ago, black_sith81 said:

Greetings,

    Just got my first EUC and need some assist anyone local I'm in Coronado, CA.

 

@black_sith81 follow me on Instagram at FlyboyEUC and I'll help you out! Or join the San Diego electric unicycle Facebook page.

Edited by Flyboy10

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