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travsformation

Brand new wheel, dislocated shoulder! Cursed be the EUC Gods!

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What about this shoulder brace for now or later until you have built up your muscles? 

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3 hours ago, buell47 said:

What about this shoulder brace for now or later until you have built up your muscles? 

That's a great idea, thanks! Will order one immediately!!! :D

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5 hours ago, buell47 said:

What about this shoulder brace for now or later until you have built up your muscles? 

 

1 hour ago, travsformation said:

That's a great idea, thanks! Will order one immediately!!! :D

Good idea but best to check with your physician and therapist first. :)

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3 hours ago, Rehab1 said:

Good idea but best to check with your physician and therapist first. 

I agree :)

My father-in-law is a traumatologist, which definitely comes in handy... Glad I'm (at the time of writing this) on his good side :D

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24 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

You are in good hands. 

 

It’s tough bouncing back from a significant shoulder injury. Using EMS should help jumpstart your upcoming strengthening regimen.

Be patient throughout your therapy. My downfall was that I tried to bounce back faster than my body would allow. 

I couldn't agree more, @Rehab1 :)

You only get one chance at the sling-wearing/healing stage (preventing elongation due to tissue scarring while inflamed) , and after that, everything has to be extremely gentle...pushing one's self too hard just once can set you back big time...

Patience is ultimately the name of the game...

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3 hours ago, buell47 said:

Patience was never my strong point when it came to injuries and the urge became too strong.

I think most guy’s fall into that category. We are a stubborn breed. 

3 hours ago, buell47 said:

I sit here with a bandage around my foot and go to the doctor again in two days.

 Best wishes. Hopefully only a sprain. 

Edited by Rehab1

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24 minutes ago, Rehab1 said:

Best wishes. Hopefully only a sprain. 

Thanks :efee47c9c8:

That is also my presumption/hope, I am only surprised that when the doctor presses, pulls and turns the foot, it does not hurt at all. Nevertheless, I cannot step with the foot, respectively kink/roll forward when walking.
Well, he does not push or pull with 78kg, maybe that makes the difference? 

On Thursday I' m going for a magnetic resonance tomography. 

Normally I wouldn't care at this time of the year in Germany, but this winter is not a real winter for the first time and you could ride all the time without freezing your ass off. :crying:

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6 hours ago, buell47 said:

That is also my presumption/hope, I am only surprised that when the doctor presses, pulls and turns the foot, it does not hurt at all.

Applying manual pressure combined with manipulation is so different than actual weight bearing. The ankle/ foot complex provides dorsi/ plantar flexion, inversion/ eversion and mediolateral rotation. With this illimitable ROM  available it is extremely difficult for a physician to isolate the exact cause of your pain. 

Glad your getting an MRI. Be well. :cheers:

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4 hours ago, buell47 said:

Sorry @travsformation for abusing your thread. 

There's no harm in derailing a frequent derailer! ;)

4 hours ago, buell47 said:

Fuck my foot if it gets worse tomorrow, it was worth it. I am soooooo happy!!! 

Awesome! Thanks for sharing! :)

But no "but my daughter forced me to go riding" if your foot gets worse! :P

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Is the shoulder brace a prudent article of gear for everyone, or is it mainly for people who constantly have to check behind to see whether their arm fell out?

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On 2/7/2020 at 1:55 AM, Biped Phil said:

Is the shoulder brace a prudent article of gear for everyone, or is it mainly for people who constantly have to check behind to see whether their arm fell out?

It basically pulls your shoulder inwards and backwards to help keep it in place, so unless you've had a previous dislocation, your body should be doing a good enough job already ;)

But @Rehab1 an probably give you a better answer than me

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4 hours ago, travsformation said:

It basically pulls your shoulder inwards and backwards to help keep it in place, so unless you've had a previous dislocation, your body should be doing a good enough job already ;)

But @Rehab1 an probably give you a better answer than me

That’s a good description. Yes the rigid molded shoulder cap incorporated into the brace’s neoprene material along with the 2 wrap around  straps are designed to resist an anterior humeral head dislocation. This brace would have minimal effect on preventing a posteriorly (rearward) dislocation.
 

The straps provide both posteriorly (rearward) and medially (inward) directed forces to help counteract the forward and lateral forces generated when the shoulder hits the ground from the side and rear. 
 

49508196722_97ce729239_b.jpg

 

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I had shoulder surgery about 14 months ago, had two full thickness rotator tears (complete tear) and a bicep tendonitis repair, it was no joke, my concern now being a new rider is protecting my shoulders and now with limited flexibility, I have to be extra cautious.  

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13 hours ago, RetroThruster said:

I had shoulder surgery about 14 months ago, had two full thickness rotator tears (complete tear) and a bicep tendonitis repair, it was no joke, my concern now being a new rider is protecting my shoulders and now with limited flexibility, I have to be extra cautious.  

Yikes! No joke, that's for sure...

If surgery went well, you shouldn't be more at risk than anyone who's never dislocated a shoulder before. But  limited flexibility after 14 months...? That should not be the case. These things depend enormously on age, physical condition, etc., but if you've taken your rehab seriously, flexibility shouldn't be an issue after that long. The best thing you can do for preventing a shoulder injury (aside from staying out of accidents) is being in the best shape possible and working on your shoulder strength and flexibility. . Whenever possible, don't delegate to external contraptions what your body, if taken good care of,  will always do better! ;)

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8 hours ago, travsformation said:

These pictures were taken 5' after taking my sling off, I'm pretty pleased:

Great ROM ! Congrats!

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12 hours ago, travsformation said:

Yikes! No joke, that's for sure...

If surgery went well, you shouldn't be more at risk than anyone who's never dislocated a shoulder before. But  limited flexibility after 14 months...? That should not be the case. These things depend enormously on age, physical condition, etc., but if you've taken your rehab seriously, flexibility shouldn't be an issue after that long. The best thing you can do for preventing a shoulder injury (aside from staying out of accidents) is being in the best shape possible and working on your shoulder strength and flexibility. . Whenever possible, don't delegate to external contraptions what your body, if taken good care of,  will always do better! ;)

I've had all sorts of minor shoulder problems, but hanging zapped it out right away.

That probably means I have impingement only problems, and by doing infrequent hanging the shoulder joint opens up just enough to get rid of the impingement for a few weeks.

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16 hours ago, Rehab1 said:

Great ROM ! Congrats!

Thanks, Rehab! :)

I've moved on from esometric exercises to resistance bands :D

Mobility is also progressing now that my muscles aren't as stiff...

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To anyone interested in the Leatt shoulder brace, I received mine today. Looks like I'm probably going to return it...

It's well built, but the medial pressure (inward) it's able to apply is minimum while the posterior pressure (backward) is quite considerable (it's very noticeable how it pulls your shoulder back). After fitting it on me and taking a good look, and then trying it on herself, my girlfriend said it would do me no good in preventing dislocations like this last one I had (caused by a violent jolt + external humeral rotation). What's more, she thinks it might even increase the likelihood: in pulling back the shoulder, as a "side effect", it also causes external humeral rotation (outward, as in your arm resting at your side with your palm facing forward)...which isn't good...

She's also fairly skeptical about whether it would prevent an anterior dislocation caused by a fall. She explained that while on paper the brace's theory of medial and posterior pressure seems fine and dandy, it misses a key point in how anterior dislocations occur: external rotation of the humeral head. Even with a strong impact, the way the humeral head fits into the glenoid cavity (of the scapula) keeps it securely in place. It's when it's rotated outward that the risk of a dislocation appears. The problem being that impacts cause the humerus to rotate externally (which she demonstrated, luckily on my good shoulder), so it's the combination of the impact plus the rotation that causes the dislocation. The brace appears to facilitate that very rotation by applying posterior pressure, and in case of an impact, would possibly exacerbate it... :facepalm:  (she doesn't quite buy the "developed in partnership with orthopedic surgeons" stated on Leatt's website)

In fact, she pointed out that if the brace applied anterior (forward) instead of posterior pressure, although it would make for an awkward position and be uncomfortable to wear, the inward rotation of the humeral head it would create would probably be much more effective at preventing a dislocation than the system used by the brace...but that all the same, there's no amount of neoprene or feasible way of securing it that can effectively counteract the humeral rotation caused by an impact...

From what she said, short of something rigid that severely impairs movement, it's near impossible to prevent a dislocation using a brace. You just can't limit the rotation of a bone (particularly on such a mobile and unstable articulation as the shoulder) from the outside: There's really no reliable external substitute for what the body can do from within. So taking good care of one's body, strengthening the area (rotator cuffs in particular), being patient and not taking any unnecessary risks prior to a full recovery are really the key points to focus on (in addition to averting crashes) ;)

Edited by travsformation

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On 2/15/2020 at 3:25 PM, travsformation said:

To anyone interested in the Leatt shoulder brace, I received mine today. Looks like I'm probably going to return it...

It's well built, but the medial pressure (inward) it's able to apply is minimum while the posterior pressure (backward) is quite considerable (it's very noticeable how it pulls your shoulder back). After fitting it on me and taking a good look, and then trying it on herself, my girlfriend said it would do me no good in preventing dislocations like this last one I had (caused by a violent jolt + external humeral rotation). What's more, she thinks it might even increase the likelihood: in pulling back the shoulder, as a "side effect", it also causes external humeral rotation (outward, as in your arm resting at your side with your palm facing forward)...which isn't good...

She's also fairly skeptical about whether it would prevent an anterior dislocation caused by a fall. She explained that while on paper the brace's theory of medial and posterior pressure seems fine and dandy, it misses a key point in how anterior dislocations occur: external rotation of the humeral head. Even with a strong impact, the way the humeral head fits into the glenoid cavity (of the scapula) keeps it securely in place. It's when it's rotated outward that the risk of a dislocation appears. The problem being that impacts cause the humerus to rotate externally (which she demonstrated, luckily on my good shoulder), so it's the combination of the impact plus the rotation that causes the dislocation. The brace appears to facilitate that very rotation by applying posterior pressure, and in case of an impact, would possibly exacerbate it... :facepalm:  (she doesn't quite buy the "developed in partnership with orthopedic surgeons" stated on Leatt's website)

In fact, she pointed out that if the brace applied anterior (forward) instead of posterior pressure, although it would make for an awkward position and be uncomfortable to wear, the inward rotation of the humeral head it would create would probably be much more effective at preventing a dislocation than the system used by the brace...but that all the same, there's no amount of neoprene or feasible way of securing it that can effectively counteract the humeral rotation caused by an impact...

From what she said, short of something rigid that severely impairs movement, it's near impossible to prevent a dislocation using a brace. You just can't limit the rotation of a bone (particularly on such a mobile and unstable articulation as the shoulder) from the outside: There's really no reliable external substitute for what the body can do from within. So taking good care of one's body, strengthening the area (rotator cuffs in particular), being patient and not taking any unnecessary risks prior to a full recovery are really the key points to focus on (in addition to averting crashes) ;)

BTW, I'd be enormously interested in your opinion on this, @Rehab1 :)

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1 hour ago, travsformation said:

BTW, I'd be enormously interested in your opinion on this, @Rehab1 :)

Both you and therapist girl friend were wise to evaluate the biomechanics of the brace. I was not sold on the idea when I first saw the brace. 
 

Trying to find some type of prophylactic device to prevent shoulder injuries while still allowing adequate ROM proves difficult.

Trust me I’ve tried all types of brace to protect myself from stem to stern. ;)

49553223366_70a4fa6028_b.jpg


Best to go the biological route and strengthen the entire rotator cuff complex. I’m sure your girlfriend has a plethora of exercises you can perform. Circular motions washing the floor and scrubbing the sink may be top on her list. :)

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