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How good is the water protection on the KS 16 really? Compared to other EUCs and more generally speaking? Would never deliberately consider taking it out in the rain, but not being able to use it when it is wet outside would be a deal-breaker. Is it sufficiently protected from below the wheel? Would a custom top rain cover be enough? Any ideas on how to rainproof the unit without voiding your warranty?

Also, what would be the most reasonable place (for me) to get the KS-16 (living in Sweden)?

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I rode 14km yesterday in the rain.. No problems so far... The compartment of the electronics is completely separated from the motor and tire.. So unless you lay it on the side down into water you should be fine. 

 

In sweden I would contact @Niclas Lagerström He has units coming in as we speak.. 

 

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What about the cooling fan and a "sealed" compartment? How can the fan get fresh cool air in  and how he get's the hot air out? Our KS16 is still on the way so I can't look on that.

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I'm not saying its sealed, just seperated so no water is coming from the tire... There are no vent opening, as far as I can see so in principle it circulating the internal air... 

You can see what I mean here.. the whole side is covered by a single piece body shell with the side cushion and LED lights, and speaker.. 

So as you see the wheel runs in separated apartment... 

 

 

 

20160106_123444.jpg.32465d1cd3ba6c3b1d4b73c5d4eb70e5.jpg

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Any idea why the new (beta?) android app isn't finding the wheel? Or indeed any bt devices?

The old app works just fine, as does bt audio.

Edit: My mistake. Had to manually edit the app permissions for storage and whatnot for it to work! it never asked for permissions. That's why it's called beta I suppose!

Edited by bjornhallberg

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Hello guys. I've just recived my K16. I'm from Spain but have bought it in France. http://gyroroue-shop.fr ;fantastic service, by the way.

Well, the Ks comes with instructions manual in French.

I would like to read one in Spanish - I'm afraid it would be impossible - or at least in English.

Can some body help me with this?

 

Thank you.

 

 

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Hi Cserna

thanks for your message

I just reply to your email,  i did ask already to the factory the manuel the English or Spanish, let me get back to you very soon.

Thanks

Edited by Gyroroue-shop.fr
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15 minutes ago, Gyroroue-shop.fr said:

Hi Cserna

thanks for your message

I just reply to your email,  i did ask already to the factory the manuel the English or Spanish, let me get back to you very soon.

Thanks

Ok. Thank you.

I would like to start my learning process tomorrow. So I am looking for information right now on the internet. No luck at the moment.

 

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Yes I've started with high confidence!

havent started the learning process yet

bye 1500€ ?

Why yo ask ?

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14 hours ago, CSERNA said:

Ok. Thank you.

I would like to start my learning process tomorrow. So I am looking for information right now on the internet. No luck at the moment.

 

@CSERNA, congratulations on your new machine.

To be honest , if the manual is anything like the one with my KS-14 you are not missing much. Basically plug the charger in to the charging socket, it is polarised so will only go in the right way, the LED on it will go red, when it goes green, the wheel is fully charged and the charger can be disconnected. The default settings will be OK to start with, you do not need to connect the app at this stage.

Before riding it I would strongly recommend protecting it with some foam padding in vulnerable areas to stop it getting scratched, some may have been supplied with the wheel, but even some old towels taped around it would help. It can come off once you are confident. 

I personally think a strap through the handle and around your wrist is well worth using in your early days, do not pull it tight and try to use it to help balance, it makes it harder, not easier. It needs to be long enough to not pull tight but not long enough to get stuck in the wheel. The idea is that if you come off you can hang on to the wheel or even lift it off the ground to stop it going out of control.

Really, the important things about how to learn to ride your wheel are probably not well covered in the instructions. Take a look at the topics on this site and also YouTube.

The KS16 has 2 buttons I believe, one is for the lights, have the wheel upright with the footplates open when you turn it on with the other (larger I think) button You should feel it become stiff in a forward/backwards direction once it has powered up.

Generally, the idea is to start with a line of posts or wall so you can hold on and get both feet comfortably on the foot plates, your feet should overhang the front more than the back so your legs are fairly central, start by gently moving your weight forward and backwards to get a feel for the handling of the wheel, start to move forwards a bit more until you can balance without holding on, then proceed to practicing stopping (near a post), turning (both ways), going a faster and then mounting without holding on to anything, etc.

Edited by Keith
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No, believe me, once it clicks, it will seem oh so easy. Learning without having someone there to guide you is the hardest way to learn. Just keep trying! You can do it! :D

What Keith didn't put in his text which I believe really helped me is the following tip: don't look at the wheel when trying to ride it. Instead look forward where you want to go! I believe by looking at the wheel the rider subconsciously reacts to the way it moves, thus making trusting the wheel to do its job in balancing you harder.

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It's not as easy as all the videos make it look!  Stick with it as it just clicks after a while.  There's a real leap of faith to trust that the wheel will balance in the forwards and backwards direction that is instinctually unnatural so your brain has to overcome it.  

You find this when learning how to ride two wheeled hoverboards.  People always wobble as their brain thinks they need to do the forwards and backwards balancing part.  Once they relax and realize that the balance movements they are doing only destabilize things that the motion diminishes so they can concentrate on the lean at the ankles instead.

If there is a hockey rink (without ice) or fence next to a soccer field you can use the wall/fence to brace.  It is very much like a bicycle where once you are going it is easier to stay upright.  You need to find your centre of balance and focus on the side to side balance while slightly leaning forwards to make the wheel go.  It's much easier to learn on grass or on a slightly deflated tire on ashphalt.

I did my learning indoors where I set up some dining room chairs. With the backs of the chairs I could hold myself up on the wheel and find my balance.  Leaning forwards at the ankles I would roll a couple of meters to the other set of chairs and catch myself before falling.  I'd turn around and repeat.

What helps a lot during starts and very slow rolling is the lower leg pivot where you twist the wheel in the direction of your fall just like turning the front wheel of a bicycle when going very slowly to counter a fall.  Me I didn't find using the hand strap to be that useful as it threw my balance off.  This video helped me a lot:

 

Edited by HunkaHunkaBurningLove
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15 hours ago, HunkaHunkaBurningLove said:

Me I didn't find using the hand strap to be that useful as it threw my balance off.  This video helped me a lot:

@HunkaHunkaBurningLove, good advice and video, slightly amusing that the "trainee" could mount the wheel unaided but not balance on it.

Regarding the strap, there does appear to be two opposing schools of thought about these. IMHO that video shows why.

If the strap is short and held tight as shown in the video, it spoils your balance. The strap needs to be long enough to be held loosely, but not too long or it will tangle around the wheel. If you fall off at learning speeds you invariably manage to stay on your feet but the wheel can charge off or spin around and wack you in the ankles, or hit a parked car, someone else, etc. Lifting the strap keeps the wheel under control or you can lift it completely off the ground, at which point it will shut down within a couple of seconds. 

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16 hours ago, HunkaHunkaBurningLove said:

It's not as easy as all the videos make it look!  Stick with it as it just clicks after a while.  There's a real leap of faith to trust that the wheel will balance in the forwards and backwards direction that is instinctually unnatural so your brain has to overcome it.  

You find this when learning how to ride two wheeled hoverboards.  People always wobble as their brain thinks they need to do the forwards and backwards balancing part.  Once they relax and realize that the balance movements they are doing only destabilize things that the motion diminishes so they can concentrate on the lean at the ankles instead.

If there is a hockey rink (without ice) or fence next to a soccer field you can use the wall/fence to brace.  It is very much like a bicycle where once you are going it is easier to stay upright.  You need to find your centre of balance and focus on the side to side balance while slightly leaning forwards to make the wheel go.  It's much easier to learn on grass or on a slightly deflated tire on ashphalt.

I did my learning indoors where I set up some dining room chairs. With the backs of the chairs I could hold myself up on the wheel and find my balance.  Leaning forwards at the ankles I would roll a couple of meters to the other set of chairs and catch myself before falling.  I'd turn around and repeat.

What helps a lot during starts and very slow rolling is the lower leg pivot where you twist the wheel in the direction of your fall just like turning the front wheel of a bicycle when going very slowly to counter a fall.  Me I didn't find using the hand strap to be that useful as it threw my balance off.  This video helped me a lot:

 

I vote for eliminating this training bands. It's not supporting you to find balance, you're locked with this. Every time we teach someone riding an EU we don't use it.

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On 30.4.2016 at 7:14 PM, CSERNA said:

First 1+1/2 hour of training.

longer trip: 5m:(

Its going to be hard. Much harder than I suposed

it is easier if you can convince/bribe a friend to run/fast walk beside you for 1/2 hour. just go in circles/elipses, try small slaloms, the first minutes with him holding you, later only grab his arm if you loose balance ... after some sessions you will ride by yourselft, but dont forget to buy him a couple of drinks afterwards :)   

alone i would train in a cellar/long hallway while holding left and right, this way you figure out how to drive and balance and later you concentrate on turning and mounting.  try to use some belt/training strap, but do not hold onto it just put it in your pocket and when you fall off pull the strap upwards to prevent scratches to the wheel or property. it helps against the exhaustion from bending down to the hill and it also helps later when you go do steep hills or go offroad, as you can prevent the wheel to go on the loose when you slip off :)

for turning, just look where you go, turn your shoulders and the wheel will follow, for slower turns use the calf and the sidepad to stabilize and increase the leanangle of the wheel.

and yes your calves will hurt, try many shorter training sessions over the day, give them time to adopt and use additional cussioning :) shinguards, towels and racetape, thick long socks.

the KS16 sidepads are very nice, but when i remember back when i started ... all that pain ... haha ... totally worth it !

 

PS: ofc the traing belt should ony be used as a leash and should not be hold on tightly or hinder the balance movements of your arms or body, that would be counter productive to your learning process

Edited by Blunzn
added PS
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21 minutes ago, CSERNA said:

2nd day of training. 50 min.

12 m. ?

Tomorrow Objective:.   20 m

Waiting for that "clic"  hunkahunkaburninglove said.

nice improvement

imagine your bicycle front tire when you try to go real slow. you stear in the direction you are going to fall. same here. 

try out different things, long elogated slalom or zick-zack through shoulder or arms movement, from twisting the waist or feets. or by putting more weight on one pedal then the other. or by a combination, going in a long low slalom line improves your balance maybe faster than going straight only. always counterbalance as soon as possible, with tiny corrections. later you'll stand on it totaly relaxed and wonder why it took so long :) 

also get used to the wheel when you control it with one foot on the floor. spinning in circles, back/forth, balance on one foot.

after you start driving further and further remember to respect the beeps, watch you pedals and dont hit anything with them, take care on gravel or wet mud, wear at least wristguards, drive cautiously on low battery and try not to run them completly empty, don't overlean, unplug after charging, don't drive downhill with a full batterie, remember most car drivers see you as pedestrian and dont know how fast you really are, train to look over the shoulder while going straight, beware of overtaking bicycles, drive slowly near dogs  ... 

happy riding ;) 

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You're doing well for two days of practice.  It took me literally months!  My gosh I felt like an uncoordinated idiot as I would veer off to one side all the time.  It didn't click for me until I practiced indoors for a while.  I should have let some air out of my tire as it arrived pumped up to the max.

I learned hoverboard riding quite quickly, and I can ride a ripstick castor board which was tricky to learn.  This EUC thing was totally alien to me.  Now, I don't know why it took so long like Blunzn said.  I think I just focus on my side to side balance while leaning forwards slightly to get the wheel rolling.  The pivot twists are handy when starting from a stop or going really slow.  I wonder if practice balancing on a short piece of board that is sitting on top of a round pencil or small metal rod might help find your balance.  If you can sort of keep level on that it might help.  Then while balancing just lean forwards slightly at the ankles while doing so.  It's a lot easier on the EUC once the wheel starts rolling a little.  It doesn't even have to be rolling fast, but as long as it's going the balance part is a lot easier I find.

Edited by HunkaHunkaBurningLove

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On 4/29/2016 at 0:54 AM, CSERNA said:

I would like to start my learning process tomorrow. So I am looking for information right now on the internet. No luck at the moment.

The thread

gives quite a few further links.

Edited by Niko
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