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Marty Backe

My Experience with Teaching How To Ride

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Congrats to Lisa!  To get to that proficiency it was over 5 hours of practice for me....

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Amazing, just 2 hours! Bravo.

I wonder if anyone ever tried to learn by pushing a baby stroller? This would help tremendously with lateral stability, while not inhibiting the forward motion. 

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Great job!!  :thumbup:

Thanks for reaching out to her. She must have had some hidden skills and a great teacher. 

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1 hour ago, Marty Backe said:

At the appointed time this morning we met on one of our river bicycle trails. She with her Inmotion V8 and me on my Mten3.

Brave with so many cars around. I did have in mind the Mten3 had a different look though.

2018607536_ScreenShot2019-12-15at03_38_32.png.61193d972e007e18701b3d6a504d4917.png

You wanted to sell it?

Edited by Mono

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5 hours ago, Aneta said:

Amazing, just 2 hours! Bravo.

I wonder if anyone ever tried to learn by pushing a baby stroller? This would help tremendously with lateral stability, while not inhibiting the forward motion. 

I don't know about a baby stroller, but I remember someone on the forums swearing by using a shopping cart...

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1 minute ago, Arbolest said:

I don't know about a baby stroller, but I remember someone on the forums swearing by using a shopping cart...

I think all of these devices help at the very beginning. But real progress only occurs when you leave all assistance behind so that the muscle memory can be formed.

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Proud day!  Congratulations to both you and Lisa! So awesome to watch!  :thumbup: :cheers:

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Marty,  you are truly a gentleman and a great ambassador to our EUC community. You taught Lisa well and have given her added confidence. I'm sure she will have lots of riding joy ahead of her.  Well done the both of you and thank you for sharing this successful outcome with us. 

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You're the Jesus of EUCs;)

15 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

Although she wanted to join us on our Hooters ride tomorrow :) she still needs a little more practice. But it won't be too long before we have a new rider on our hands. Expect to see Lisa in one of our future group rides.

Why didn't you let her join? She would have learned so fast on a group ride! Nothing better than challenging yourself (but not too crazy far out of the comfort zone, as her wanting to join shows). Missed opportunity! Or do you guys all speed at 40kph on these rides?

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1 hour ago, meepmeepmayer said:

You're the Jesus of EUCs;)

Why didn't you let her join? She would have learned so fast on a group ride! Nothing better than challenging yourself (but not too crazy far out of the comfort zone, as her wanting to join shows). Missed opportunity! Or do you guys all speed at 40kph on these rides?

:laughbounce2:

40kph isn't exactly speeding (even for me). Lisa was doing great but in no way could keep up with a group ride. And besides the required riding skills, traveling 35+ miles takes a lot of stamina. I think you're just having some fun with me :)

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1 hour ago, Marty Backe said:

I think you're just having some fun with me :)

I assumed your group ride was V8 compatible, because you said she needs to learn more instead of needing a faster and higher range wheel. But if it's 35 miles, that rules it out anyways.

A suitable group ride, forcing a new rider to overcome a rapid challenge, would be a fantastic learning experience though. That was my point:)

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@Marty Backe Thats awesome! It took me over a week or more of very frustrating 20 minute attempts to get where she is at now!

Saved both her and the v8 alot of little bumps and bruises too! Props Marty,

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Quote

I now see that the Mten3 is an amazing wheel to help someone learn to balance.

What would you say is the key difference from the V8 in this regard?

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49 minutes ago, Biped Phil said:

 

What would you say is the key difference from the V8 in this regard?

The V8 has a very thin tire compared to the 3-inch Mten3. And that's why the Z10 is even better for learning with its 4.1-inch tire.

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On 12/15/2019 at 7:32 PM, Marty Backe said:

40kph isn't exactly speeding (even for me).

There are two fundamentally different EUCing cultures populating this globe. One for which 40km/h is not exactly speeding and the other for which surpassing 25km/h is simply off limits. Always good to keep this in mind :rolleyes:

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1 hour ago, Mono said:

There are two fundamentally different EUCing cultures populating this globe. One for which 40km/h is not exactly speeding and the other for which surpassing 25km/h is simply off limits. Always good to keep this in mind :rolleyes:

Falling at 40km/h and hitting a stopping obstacle (concrete wall, tree, light pole) is equivalent to jumping from 2-story building (6.3m) and landing on random part of your body. Falling at 25km/h is equivalent to jumping from only 2.5m (basically, falling from a ladder). We don't feel the speed until we taste it. (everyone who impacted hard knows that metallic taste in their mouth right after impact)

Just something to think about.

My hard limit is also 25kph. As our wheels get faster and more powerful, our bodies do not take impacts any better.

Edited by Aneta

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Results show that the average risk of severe injury for a pedestrian struck by a vehicle reaches 10% at an impact speed of 16 mph, 25% at 23 mph, 50% at 31 mph, 75% at 39 mph, and 90% at 46 mph. The average risk of death for a pedestrian reaches 10% at an impact speed of 23 mph, 25% at 32 mph, 50% at 42 mph, 75% at 50 mph, and 90% at 58 mph. Risks vary significantly by age. For example, the average risk of severe injury or death for a 70‐year old pedestrian struck by a car traveling at 25 mph is similar to the risk for a 30‐year‐old pedestrian struck at 35 mph.

https://aaafoundation.org/impact-speed-pedestrians-risk-severe-injury-death/

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31 minutes ago, Aneta said:

Falling at 40km/h and hitting a stopping obstacle (concrete wall, tree, light pole) is equivalent to jumping from 2-story building (6.3m) and landing on random part of your body. Falling at 25km/h is equivalent to jumping from only 2.5m (basically, falling from a ladder). We don't feel the speed until we taste it. (everyone who impacted hard knows that metallic taste in their mouth right after impact)

Just something to think about.

Walking and hitting a tree, curb, wall also hurts quite a bit. I hit my toe off a wall the other day doing low speeds. Some call it walking. Hurt like mad. This is why i opt in for the "Dont ride at 40km/h towards concrete walls, between trees or on a sidewalk going around light poles" rule. Following this has saved me much pain!

 

@Marty Backe

A lot of this game is psychological, and you saved Lisa a good few weeks to a month worth of that pain and struggle! I remember walking my wheel to the school grounds to go practice, and my legs shaking because i was nervous and embarrassed that i couldnt ride. That people would see me failing. That id fall, as the fear of the fall was crippling. The feeling of not being able to do it at all made the idea of taking the wheel out feel like a negative. I felt hopeless and the wheel was  big weight on my shoulders. Filming my progress and sharing it with you guys is what almost forced me to get back outside daily to practice. By getting lisa on that wheel and actually rolling, shes overcome one of the biggest hurdles. She now knows she CAN do it! Now what comes is that first stupid mistake and fall. Once shes gone through that (hopefully with super minor injuries and at a low speed) she'll have shed most of the fear. Or at least thats how it was for me. Haha. 

Edited by seage

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3 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

EUC riders don't run dead into vertical walls, though.

EUC crashes are about impact and abrasion (and their consequences). Not sure how big the difference is for both of them at 30kph vs 50kph.

Anyways, this topic is about something else:whistling: @Marty Backe did you make sure Lisa knows about wrist guards (and all the other stuff, but wrist guards most of all)?

Yes, of course. And she is very safety conscious from previous sporting activities. Unfortunately, on the day that we met she forgot everything except the helmet :(

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3 hours ago, seage said:

Walking and hitting a tree, curb, wall also hurts quite a bit. I hit my toe off a wall the other day doing low speeds. Some call it walking. Hurt like mad. This is why i opt in for the "Dont ride at 40km/h towards concrete walls, between trees or on a sidewalk going around light poles" rule. Following this has saved me much pain!

 

@Marty Backe

A lot of this game is psychological, and you saved Lisa a good few weeks to a month worth of that pain and struggle! I remember walking my wheel to the school grounds to go practice, and my legs shaking because i was nervous and embarrassed that i couldnt ride. That people would see me failing. That id fall, as the fear of the fall was crippling. The feeling of not being able to do it at all made the idea of taking the wheel out feel like a negative. I felt hopeless and the wheel was  big weight on my shoulders. Filming my progress and sharing it with you guys is what almost forced me to get back outside daily to practice. By getting lisa on that wheel and actually rolling, shes overcome one of the biggest hurdles. She now knows she CAN do it! Now what comes is that first stupid mistake and fall. Once shes gone through that (hopefully with super minor injuries and at a low speed) she'll have shed most of the fear. Or at least thats how it was for me. Haha. 

Yes, I was continually giving her positive feedback and letting her know that all the silly stuff she was doing (hand waiving, falling, etc), we've all done.

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