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LadyPug

Is an EUC for me?

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Hey everyone,

I’m new to the forum and am here to explore whether an EUC could be a fit for me even though I have hip replacements and don’t want to fall, pretty much ever.  I discovered the EUC by accident when I was out walking my dogs and a young man zipped by me on his wheel.  IMO, he was traveling much too fast for the bike path we were on and zipped by so fast I couldn't even tell you if he wore protective gear, but as a former motorcyclist, I was intrigued about this mode of transportation and wanted to know more.  

I've watched a ton of videos and read a number of posts, checking out the different EUCs.  I’m intrigued by the few EUC’s that offer a seat and wonder if riding seated offers a slight degree of additional safety in bringing the center of gravity down as well as allowing both feet to be put down quickly in the event of an emergency stop.  I notice also that those EUC’s with seats are generally the highest power options and generally not marketed as beginner wheels.

I’ll be a conservative rider.  I won’t be pushing the speed limit of the wheel as I don’t want to risk injury or dislocation of my hip replacements.  So basic question is: do you experienced people think I can learn from the get-go to ride seated?  I realize there are devices out there that are specifically a seated unicycle with a fat tire and handle, but I don’t like this set up as they seem too big to walk into a store with such a device which is what I’d do with an EUC rather than leave it unattended outside.

I’ll also add that I plan to learn to ride standing with ‘training wheels’ sort of.  I have a bike trailer/stroller that I use when I walk my dogs.  I tether the dogs to the stroller so the stroller absorbs any pulling by them instead of it torquing my hips.  Eventually, it would be nice to use the wheel to ‘walk’ them in this setup so we could zip along a little faster, but in the beginning, I could just use the trailer/stroller as my ‘moving rail’ to help with balance as I learn.

So, thoughts? Should I pursue learning to ride an EUC, a large one with the seated option, or would you say it’s not advisable under the circumstances?   Btw, I’m mid 50’s and female.

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1 minute ago, atdlzpae said:

Riding seated offers less safety - you have way less control over the wheel and it's impossible to "run off" a crash. It's also way harder to ride slowly.
Seated riding is an advanced and dangerous technique that very few of us use.

Training wheels don't help in learning. You have to learn some subconscious reflexes to ride a unicycle and training wheels negate them.
I didn't faceplant during the learning phase, only later. So it's absolutely possible to learn to ride without faceplanting. But with 50 "ran-off" crashes. ;-)

EUC's are not for you! You're not fit enough. You can't run off a crash. You will faceplant at some point.

Maybe try an e-bike? With additional wheels to keep it stable?

I agree this is something you need to evaluate before setting your mind to this. None of us here know what you can or cannot do right now or later. From what I know of replacement joints, is you could move almost like normal, or it can be a struggle. 

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I would not suggest riding an EUC with said limitations, especially if you don't want to run the risk of ever falling. Minor tumbles are expected when you're learning, but the ability to recover from a tumble and have it not turn into a 'fall' depends greatly on your mobility and ability to react. Riding an EUC isn't all that strenuous, but feet/legs/knees/ hips are all necessary for balance, shock absorption, and control.

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 Where is @Rehab1 when you need him?! 

My first thought is that EUC’s are a bad choice for you. However, several people here have used them to replace a wheelchair. They have become stronger and more capable. Riding an EUC is a fun way to build core muscles. Building core muscles makes most people stronger and less likely to get hurt when they do fall. I am not sure that core muscles would improve a hip replacement. Unfortunately everyone ends up hitting the ground at some point. 

  I have a great deal of respect for  @Unventor and several others ( you know who you are) that have chosen the more risky solution to freedom.   In the end I am NOT going to suggest that you choose the EUC. 

Best wishes, 

 

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you will fall, its a fact.. if you ride on any sort of a regular basis its inevitable.. how badly depends, but mid 50s with hip replacements im going to have to assume your reflexes and athleticism arent that of a 20 year old.. i wouldnt say you shouldnt do it, just dont expect it to be perfectly safe all the time.. and no, seated riding is not safer, far from it its much more dangerous and more difficult than riding standing.. as other have said, training wheels will only hinder you they are completely pointless imo. honestly, i think a much better choice would be an electric scooter, an euc seems like a poor fit, though with enough dedication its possible for anyone to ride one well so if you have some money to blow you could try one out and see what you think, perhaps there is somewhere that can rent one out instead of having to buy one? or even somewhere that offers lessons?

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One more thought... I think you/EUCs are on the cusp of a transportation revolution.  It’s exciting to see all the options for personal transportation that gives people the freedom of mobility that is not dependent on a car, including EUCs, escooters, one wheelers, electric skateboards, etc. and to see all the options that have come to market in just a few short years.   A single wheeled self balancing electric vehicle may not be the best choice for someone like me, but perhaps the innovations happening in the market will lead to something more feasible for folks like me.

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Sad to agree with everyone else, but given your concerns you absolutely should stay far far away from EUC's :(

Riding our wheels is a contact support. I don't care how careful you are, eventually you will hit the ground, and hit it hard. It just comes with the territory. If you don't have some fall(s) while learning (hard to imagine) you will eventually as the miles add up.

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One thing to keep in mind, most here ride medium to very fast. If you ride at 10-20kmh the risk is there but not as high. It is like cycling, you need momentum to stay balanced. 

My comfort zone moved from 45kmh to 30-35kmh on open cycle lanes. It is all about taking calculated risks. 

Anything you do have this, like walking on a winter day and falling on slippery ice. At least if you practice always all gear you have some protection.

Btw thanks @RockyTop it warms with a comment like yours. 

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I also agree with everyone here ... EUC should not be your first choice for personal transport, but you can certainly buy something small like an InMotion v5 to play around on at low speeds where you can step off if something goes wrong. For personal transport something like a Xiaomi M365 eScooter is better and also will cost less than half the price and is easier to repair due to cheap parts availability. A scooter is fun too and with less risk even if something fails. Once you have experience riding a few years you will know if its safe to upgrade to a larger EUC without taking on too much risk.

Edited by Nic

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A related but much more common question, hence the answer is most likely out there (but I don't know it by heart):

Would we discourage someone to start learn skiing in this case? Or to pick up skiing again or to continue skiing?

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17 minutes ago, Mono said:

Would we discourage someone to start learn skiing in this case? Or to pick up skiing again or to continue skiing?

I think it is a fair point, but most skislopes are not asphalt hard or scrapes in the same way if you fall. It might no be soft. 

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21 minutes ago, Mono said:

Would we discourage someone to start learn skiing in this case? Or to pick up skiing again or to continue skiing?

It depends on the reasons why they ski. If it is because they love skiing or idea of skiing, then they will accept risk and just do it regardless. If its just a means of transport, then there may be better safer methods available. They can choose more than one method of getting around and spread their risk also. When riding conditions are bad they may prefer one choice over another. EUCs are both fun and scary at the same time, especially in windy conditions. I don't think its wise to go 'all-in' with an expensive purchase when you might find you are happier with something much cheaper and safer. I still enjoy riding my bicycle and it keeps me fit too, but I also have a v8 EUC and am M365 scooter.

Edited by Nic

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If you have a history of riding bikes/mopeds/motorcycles and consider yourself to always staying calm in traffic, prioritizing safety first, and have health insurance, then I say go for it. :)

It could be the best and/or the worst idea you've had. 

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Reason for deletion of original 12 paragraph, 750+ word post: overwritten with way too much information, original copy sent to OP in case anything might have been useful.

(first post in almost four years, hey,  I've got plenty of rust to shake off here)  ;-)

 

 

Edited by BecauseFun
overwritten

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13 minutes ago, BecauseFun said:

also have a friend to lean on as you get going, all the better.

This! I was having trouble getting going for 2-3 weeks. I got a kind soul to volunteer to help me this way and I was riding inside of another week! Cannot recommend this approach more highly!

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On 12/3/2019 at 1:11 AM, LadyPug said:

I've watched a ton of videos and read a number of posts, checking out the different EUCs.  I’m intrigued by the few EUC’s that offer a seat and wonder if riding seated offers a slight degree of additional safety in bringing the center of gravity down as well as allowing both feet to be put down quickly in the event of an emergency stop.

I also think sitting is a relevant advantage in case of a fall, because the body is less high to begin with. Bringing the feet down for an emergency stopping is not likely to be a good idea. To keep the feet on the pedals is still important to stay in control.

When people talk about safety in this forum, keep in mind that most of them are male and most of them go happily faster than 20mph and that's their experience and how they do their assessments. I personally also don't mind falling as long as it doesn't hurt, so I do fall from time to time and didn't hurt myself so far (I don't wear any safety gear since a long time). From this position it is kind of hard to say how a seriously risk averse person would succeed.

Quote

 I notice also that those EUC’s with seats are generally the highest power options and generally not marketed as beginner wheels.

I think the main "problem" is that the wheel must be tall (and sturdy) to make seating a feasible option with a simple modification. With a small (and hence usually light) wheel getting a comfy seat on the wheel is quite a challenge.    

Quote

I’ll be a conservative rider.  I won’t be pushing the speed limit of the wheel as I don’t want to risk injury or dislocation of my hip replacements.  So basic question is: do you experienced people think I can learn from the get-go to ride seated?

Yes, I think so. Not many people have done that, but (one of) the very first EUCs, the SBU, was actually a seated EUC, inheriting from the conventional unicycle.

Here are three other seat vids you might not have seen:

Quote

 I realize there are devices out there that are specifically a seated unicycle with a fat tire and handle, but I don’t like this set up as they seem too big to walk into a store with such a device which is what I’d do with an EUC rather than leave it unattended outside.

I’ll also add that I plan to learn to ride standing with ‘training wheels’ sort of.  I have a bike trailer/stroller that I use when I walk my dogs.  I tether the dogs to the stroller so the stroller absorbs any pulling by them instead of it torquing my hips.  Eventually, it would be nice to use the wheel to ‘walk’ them in this setup so we could zip along a little faster, but in the beginning, I could just use the trailer/stroller as my ‘moving rail’ to help with balance as I learn.

So, thoughts? Should I pursue learning to ride an EUC, a large one with the seated option, or would you say it’s not advisable under the circumstances?   Btw, I’m mid 50’s and female.

I don't think this is an obvious yes or no. You could get a big wheel with a seat, which is heavy and expensive. I am personally not a fan of heavy wheels and if you don't want to go fast (big motor) or far (big battery) you don't need a heavy wheel. You could get a smaller wheel and add a saddle, which means some sort of DIY.

Edited by Mono

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