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Mono

Which riding skills can prevent broken bones?

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I did judo for 10 years when I was young. One time I was biking and my front wheel fell into a grill, instantly stopping my bike. I jumped over the bike and performed a roll on my shoulder/side before landing straight on my feet. I was going fast and had a minor scratch on my wrist. An old lady saw the whole thing and thought I was quite the stuntman. I didnt think, I just reacted. My 10,000 judo rolls in practice helped me a lot.

Moral of the story: Learn HOW to fall. And practice it.

 

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I think learning to ride slowly is something anyone can do and will prevent injuries. :confused1:

... but on a more serious note it is best to avoid getting into situations that can lead to a fall ... for example, I am having a difficult time dealing with wobbles induced by crosswinds as its often windy where I live. Also, learning to keep calm when someone goes ""BOO" helps. I did go over the handlebars on my bicycle when I was a child and I still have a small flat spot on my forehead where I landed (explains a lot). I expect I will take a tumble at speed one day, so it would be nice to learn some skills and be prepared. I anticipate trying to tuck my head in and roll, but I haven't practised this, so who knows how that will go.:blink1:

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I don't think there's any one particular skill that you can work on but rather a number of skills that need to be tested fairly often. Wheels aren't vehicles that you can relax on. Probably a veteran rider is always under some low level caution/stress.

I think the best skills practice is to simply ride a lot over grass fields. Yeah, it sucks, and it uncomfortable, and you'll crash or run off a lot, but if you're serious about wheels then you need to do it almost every ride you go on, if just for a minute or two. I'm not talking about dirt paths or gravel; it's grassy fields with evil invisible potholes that you need to regularly ride over.

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4 hours ago, Nic said:

I think learning to ride slowly is something anyone can do and will prevent injuries. :confused1:

... but on a more serious note it is best to avoid getting into situations that can lead to a fall ... for example, I am having a difficult time dealing with wobbles induced by crosswinds as its often windy where I live. Also, learning to keep calm when someone goes ""BOO" helps. I did go over the handlebars on my bicycle when I was a child and I still have a small flat spot on my forehead where I landed (explains a lot). I expect I will take a tumble at speed one day, so it would be nice to learn some skills and be prepared. I anticipate trying to tuck my head in and roll, but I haven't practised this, so who knows how that will go.:blink1:

I used to really hate the wind. It would scare the crap out of me especially on bridges.
Lately I started going out on windy days and practiced tucking. That caused even more wobbles in the beginning but now after quite a bit of practice I can tuck no problem on the CX and MSX. Longboard style with my hands behind my back. Feeling a tiny bit exposed when doing it though... :efee612b4b: Winds coming from the side can be pretty scary but riding low helps and so does leaning the wheel on one leg.

Regarding tucking your head in.. that sounds like a sure way to land on your head or your upper spine and boy will that hurt.

So in regards to learning how to fall perhaps we should look at how not to fall. But that is our of scope for this thread and too much wishful thinking for me. :efefc8626c:

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@Mono I think you did an amazing job of asking a question and answering it. 

Removing natural skill and reflexes you are back to practice. More specifically safely find the edge of your abilities and improve your weaknesses. Sadly if you don’t like doing it or avoid it doing it, you have found your weaknesses. I do not suggest riding too fast of riding the tilt. For me it would trying to keep up with @pico. Although I keep telling people, if I can’t dance without the wheel how do you expect me to dance with it! 

The lines or grooves sound like a good idea. I would follow that up with 1 inch curbs at angle. Warning to newbies, this is exactly things that you want to avoid. 

I think riding mountain bike trails helped me the most. 

Edited by RockyTop

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On 11/1/2019 at 11:51 PM, Mike Sacristan said:

With soft ankles.

+1, using soft riding mode once in a while could be a good idea to become more flexible...

On 11/2/2019 at 12:04 AM, RockyTop said:

I would follow that up with 1 inch curbs at angle.

+1, it's part of my almost-daily practice routine. It's seriously scary at very acute angles and in particular when wet. I sometimes manage even below 10º, I believe.

Edited by Mono

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