Jump to content
mrelwood

CST C-186 tire review (MSX)

Recommended Posts

On 11/9/2019 at 4:26 PM, mrelwood said:

I’m certain that all 2.50-14 tires will fit on the MSX. In my understanding ”Minicross” is just a certain type or size of kids’ motocross bikes, and for example a local second hand sales portal even has many unmounted 2.50-14 Minicross tires for sale for very cheap. All with the exact same knob pattern even.

What I didn’t like about the used one I got was that it required a lot more active style of riding on faster stretches of pavement. I love that on the regular tires (and pretty much on the C-186 as well) I can relax at speed as the MSX will be very stable and doesn’t care if I move around to stretch my feet or even change my position a bit. I wasn’t able to do that on the specific Minicross tire, since the placement of the rows of knobbies left an empty area next to the row of the sidemost knobs, so it behaved like a much narrower tire.

I would check if you can find a Minicross tire that has a more uniform pattern of knobbies. If you do, it would surely be a nicer ride.

Thanks.  Per some research, I'm getting an IRC T10299 2.5x14.  Here's what I've learned:

Tire ---------------------size --------- diameter ---------------------comment

IRC T10299         2.50-14        17.9                               per an ebay listing  (my purchase now)

Stock                     2.70-14*        19                                 measured (* size marked as: 18x3.0/76-355)

Shinko SR244      2.75-14          20.3                              measured

Shinko SR241      2.75-14          20.3                              per an ebay listing

C-186                    2.75-14          20.3?                            Per google the SR241 appears to be the same tire... though IDK per dialog here.

 

So I'm giving up shock absorption for torque.  Maybe I'll end up putting springs into my peddles (another member here did that), especially since I'll be standing an inch lower now. :D

Edited by Elliott Reitz
+size

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

Thanks.  Per some research, I'm getting an IRC T10299 2.5x14.

That tire looks nasty!

 

6 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

C-186                    2.75-14          20.3?                            Per google the SR241 appears to be the same tire... though IDK per dialog here.

It looks identical on Google image search, but it’s definitely a different tire. The knobbies are spaced differently. 

 

6 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

Maybe I'll end up putting springs into my peddles (another member here did that)

That was me actually! It works pretty nicely on rough packed snow, although, I’d recommend shoes with a thick Adidas Boost midsole instead as the first step as it is much easier, and in some sence even more effective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mrelwood said:

That was me actually! It works pretty nicely on rough packed snow, although, I’d recommend shoes with a thick Adidas Boost midsole instead as the first step as it is much easier, and in some sence even more effective.

Please share your experience with that... link to this thread so I can find it.  I have both Nikola and Stock peddles.  The hardest part seems to be where to find the perfect springs for the scheme to anchor the plate.  Like clutch springs under, or a leaf over... etc.

Edited by Elliott Reitz
- from quote

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, RagingGrandpa said:

You must hate hard surfaces :)

t10299_1.jpg

 

So far my max speed on my MSX is only 35 mph.  With this T10299 I believe I'll be hitting the 42 mph alarm speed. My issue with the SR244 is/was how the 20" diameter forced me to slow down per torque.  Never mind the wheel diameter differences to spedometer readings.  The truth is TORQUE matters!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

Please share your experience with that... link to this thread so I can find it.  I have both Nikola and Stock peddles.  The hardest part seems to be where to find the perfect springs for the scheme to anchor the plate.  Like clutch springs under, or a leaf over... etc.

I have not posted a detailed description of any of the shock absorbing tests I've made on my wheels, since I haven't been able to figure out a very straightforward process that would clearly result in a well working solution for most riders.

Actually I only now realised that you might be talking about literal coiled springs. If you are talking about the elaborated hinged system seen in YT a year or two ago, that's not me. I only have a shoe sized DIY top plate fixed at the frontmost bolts, blocks of sponge rubber strip under the heel, and longer bolts at the rear to limit the travel upwards.

When I accelerate, the pedals are effectively solid. The suspension is only fully at work when I brake, and at half effect at a steady speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mrelwood said:

I have not posted a detailed description of any of the shock absorbing tests I've made on my wheels, since I haven't been able to figure out a very straightforward process that would clearly result in a well working solution for most riders.

Actually I only now realised that you might be talking about literal coiled springs. If you are talking about the elaborated hinged system seen in YT a year or two ago, that's not me. I only have a shoe sized DIY top plate fixed at the frontmost bolts, blocks of sponge rubber strip under the heel, and longer bolts at the rear to limit the travel upwards.

When I accelerate, the pedals are effectively solid. The suspension is only fully at work when I brake, and at half effect at a steady speed.

Thanks.  Yes I'm thinking coil springs.  Basically peddles are 6" too short IMHO... so 1st an under-peddle-plate to extend, then coils on the 4 corners to hold an upper plate that moves.  The springs:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Barnett-Clutch-Springs-MT-90-501-44-06090/281795640134?epid=1851167096&hash=item419c543b46:g:uWYAAOSwEetV8JbS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I’ve learned from my shock absorber tests is that in any situation:

- The front of the pedal can only dip very slightly more than the rear. So that leaning forward should not notably change the tilt or dip the pedal.

- The outer edge can’t be let dip more than the inner edge.

- There must be zero twisting movement from twisting one’s foot.

Otherwise the wheel will instantly feel insecure, and can only be ridden very peacefully. Tight turns would be very challenging.

And my experiments were only made with a maximum of 1/2” of travel. Put in a set of actual coiled springs and disregard the rules above and the wheel is nothing but a dangerous and uncomfortable experiment.

An ideal would be a pedal that can not tilt or twist the slightest in any direction, yet would have direct up-down travel. I don’t have the skills to put together something like that. But I’m eagerly waiting to see what Inmotion has come up for the V12!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!

11 hours ago, mrelwood said:

What I’ve learned from my shock absorber tests is that in any situation:

- The front of the pedal can only dip very slightly more than the rear. So that leaning forward should not notably change the tilt or dip the pedal.

- The outer edge can’t be let dip more than the inner edge.

- There must be zero twisting movement from twisting one’s foot.

Otherwise the wheel will instantly feel insecure, and can only be ridden very peacefully. Tight turns would be very challenging.

And my experiments were only made with a maximum of 1/2” of travel. Put in a set of actual coiled springs and disregard the rules above and the wheel is nothing but a dangerous and uncomfortable experiment.

An ideal would be a pedal that can not tilt or twist the slightest in any direction, yet would have direct up-down travel. I don’t have the skills to put together something like that. But I’m eagerly waiting to see what Inmotion has come up for the V12!

Thanks for the "requirements" that I need.  I'm actually an unemployed engineer.  IDK if I can come up with a better solution than foam pads... yet motivation exists, especially as I'm giving up the big-soft tire... and motivation is the mother of invention. 

BS follows: 

I actually do have 14 patents, so I know better than to think I'd make $ solving this engineering problem.  Instead, I still hope to see a better manufactured solution.  So if my prototypes or blog-posts contribute...  i.e.:  I built a 20Ah 1000W e-bike in 2009 for under $500... rode it for years... rebuilt it into a folding mountain bike in 2012, and rode it in NY then Puerto Rico and back... my breaks suck... IDK about rebuilding it again.  EUCs rock... yet my GF's mom rode my old pathetic ebike!  Perhapse my next project should be something that flies!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

14 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

I'm actually an unemployed engineer.

I’m sure you have the skills to design pretty much any kind of suspension system to an EUC. But...

14 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

  IDK if I can come up with a better solution than foam pads...

...it doesn’t seem to be all that obvious what kind of a design would actually be useful and worth the build.

Seeing my pairs of shoes again when coming home just now I realized that a squishy shoe midsole really is a great solution. I’m not sure if the idea can be utilized further than as a heel pad though.

 

14 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

my GF's mom rode my old pathetic ebike!

Quite some wheels she got there! The top speed could be a tad higher though... :roflmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plan B looks practical for anyone that can't find a C-186: https://forum.electricunicycle.org/topic/12504-the-tyre-tire-thread/?do=findComment&comment=283462

 

/18/2019 at 5:10 PM, Elliott Reitz said:

Per behaviour question:  Carving with the stock tire was sluggish compared to the e+ though that wheel is slow.  With the 2.75-14 SR244, carving was worse though tolerated for knobby off-road benefit... top-speed also acted like I weighed 400 lbs (kicked me back allot more)... and that SR244 didn't fit (cut off the outter knobs as well as shaved the case where I could... lack of clearance was a hazzard in more ways than one too).

So I today I installed the 2.50-14 standard knobby.  Its also labeled 87-5718, GS-45F, and Mfg PN: T10299.  I've had 1 ride on it in snowy/icy conditions with a about 20 psi in it.  Id say its what I wanted to start with.  In the pic its the one on the right.  Stock is in the middle and the SR244 is on the left. 

The 2.75-14 SR244 was 20.5" diameter inflated (measured).  The SR244 was too big, effected the command-input so it felt like it lost torque most notably at very low and very high speeds).  Stock was 19" diameter... and the The 2.50-14 is about 18.75" (I just measured that), so it seems to handle better.  Its much more manouverable than it was, even better than stock.  As for squishy tire, it was soft enough with 20 psi.  So all in all I'm happy with it! 

Here's the ebay (over 10 available, $33 delivered in the US):  https://www.ebay.com/itm/IRC-M2E-Front-Tire-Sold-Each-2-50-14-Mark-II/233398274183?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

20191218_150647.jpg

mounted.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2019 at 7:49 PM, mrelwood said:

The only downside I can think of is the tilting behaviour

The tire looks like it should be rather noisy on pavement, it's not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mono said:

The tire looks like it should be rather noisy on pavement, it's not?

As I mentioned in the first post, I didn’t first even really notice the sound. Sure it’s a bit noisier than the original, but not generally very noisy. After all, the knobs are tightly placed and they cover most of the tire’s surface area.

These motocross tires that are posted on this second page are in a completely different class of noisy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t think I mentioned it on this thread earlier, but when the first snow came down a few months ago, I installed studs on my C-186. I think that made the winter scared, and we’ve been practically without snow or freezing ever since. Steals a bit of christmas spirit. Luckily the eighty-something studs didn’t bother me on tarmac, so I didn’t even consider screwing them off in wait for real winter.

Yesterday I finally had the chance to test the studded C-186 on ice and thin snow. I bravely took on my standard 55km headclear trip that concentrates on cycleways and cross-country skiing paths through the woods. A few short but very steep inclines and declines are included.

I started slow and scared, since half of the pathways were perhaps in the worst possible condition: bumpy footprint packed ice with intermittent crunchy snow patches, topped with water from the melting ice. I was slowly able to increase my speed, since the tire seemed to grip like i’d expect it to on tight packed snow. By the time I was coming back I was riding speeds I might do in the summer as well if looking for a bit more relaxing ride. I did feel and hear the studs truly grab in a few spots, which I’m sure would’ve made me a goner without the studs.

Also the few steep inclines really made the studs rattle for grip, since the inclines were so bumpy that I couldn’t go faster than walking speed. Since the soil was now firm, I actually had a slightly easier time getting to the top!

The C-186 with 84ish tiny 4x9mm screw-in carbide studs is a combination that can truly tackle everything. Studs on a harder compound tire would’ve surely made the ride less stable, unless much bigger studs were used. The way it is now, I feel like I can ride relaxed no matter what the late winter gives us. Of course I won’t do summer speeds, especially when cornering, but I have no issue going for a ride no matter what stuff it’s covered with. Snow, ice, slush, mud, wet leaves... even dry tarmac is not a problem.

And that single sentence makes me feel so great I can’t even describe! No longer anxiously waiting for the snows to melt or be forced to quit riding for four months.

If you wish to ride during an icy winter, the studs is absolutely where it’s at. You just can’t relax without them. Unfortunately even the smallest studs require a thicker tire than any EUC comes with standard. Some people try to protect the inner tube with a slice of rubber, but that doesn’t seem to be enough. Besides, studs don’t grab much on snow. And neither does a standard tire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mrelwood said:

As I mentioned in the first post, I didn’t first even really notice the sound. Sure it’s a bit noisier than the original, but not generally very noisy. After all, the knobs are tightly placed and they cover most of the tire’s surface area.

These motocross tires that are posted on this second page are in a completely different class of noisy!

With a motorcross tire I can say I don't think noise is a factor.  My dog's collar makes more noise (gingleing the tags).  Wind noise is the biggest noise factor by far.  Also, the vibration is completely tolerable under 10mph, and over 20mph its barely noticeable. 

5 minutes ago, mrelwood said:

Yesterday I finally had the chance to test the studded C-186 on ice and thin snow. I bravely took on my standard 55km headclear trip that concentrates on cycleways and cross-country skiing paths through the woods. A few short but very steep inclines and declines are included.

The C-186 with 84ish tiny 4x9mm screw-in carbide studs is a combination that can truly tackle everything. Studs on a harder compound tire would’ve surely made the ride less stable, unless much bigger studs were used. The way it is now, I feel like I can ride relaxed no matter what the late winter gives us. Of course I won’t do summer speeds, especially when cornering, but I have no issue going for a ride no matter what stuff it’s covered with. Snow, ice, slush, mud, wet leaves... even dry tarmac is not a problem.

And that single sentence makes me feel so great I can’t even describe! No longer anxiously waiting for the snows to melt or be forced to quit riding for four months.

If you wish to ride during an icy winter, the studs is absolutely where it’s at. You just can’t relax without them. Unfortunately even the smallest studs require a thicker tire than any EUC comes with standard. Some people try to protect the inner tube with a slice of rubber, but that doesn’t seem to be enough. Besides, studs don’t grab much on snow. And neither does a standard tire.

I've not tried studs and don't feel the need.  The motorcross style knobby is great for snow, mud, slush, even frozen-spots in slush such as walked on sidewalk snow-packed.  As for black-ice studs would eliminate that risk. 

What's the biggest risk?  Command Authority!  When? unseen soft spots such as mud with grass over it, or snow-drift spots.   Basically cruising along at 10 mph and suddenly hit mud without noticing it... the wheel can do the mud but takes much more tilt as though the rider is 100 lbs heavier.  Considering control systems (I=engineer), the system acts like a type-1 system, where a type 2 system might work yet better since it would be more sensitive to acceleration input than tilt-input.  As it is I compensate for hitting soft spots by clentching the wheel between my heels and knees.  There's one grassy area that floods with about an inch of water... once in that soft stuff it works fine... the transition is the hardest part.  Same on the exit where sometimes there's a lip in the soft-mud requiring the wheel to spin out of it... similar to snow in front of a curb-climb. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Mono said:

The tire looks like it should be rather noisy on pavement, it's not?

On smooth asphalt in a quiet area, especially with walls or trees alongside to reflect the sound... yes, notable tread buzz with C-186.

Super smooth ride though, I feel zero knob vibration even at my lowest speeds.

 

1 hour ago, Elliott Reitz said:

What's the biggest risk?  Command Authority!  When? unseen soft spots such as mud with grass over it, or snow-drift spots.   Basically cruising along at 10 mph and suddenly hit mud without noticing it... the wheel can do the mud but takes much more tilt as though the rider is 100 lbs heavier.

You, sir, need torque pegs / power pads / shin blocks / whatever it takes to put something in contact with your shin to increase the torque command when it tries to launch you off the front with unexpected deceleration ;)

WjUG9m2PIEoNYxeItpAXqUgRujd947TPrWbBj3eK

Edited by RagingGrandpa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

With a motorcross tire I can say I don't think noise is a factor.  My dog's collar makes more noise (gingleing the tags).  Wind noise is the biggest noise factor by far.  Also, the vibration is completely tolerable under 10mph, and over 20mph its barely noticeable.

Your tire sounds like a very different one than the harsh knobby I tried on a 16X. The vibration and resistance grew so strong before 30km/h that I didn’t have the guts to push through. The owner must’ve had a very high pressure in it, or the tire is just very different.

 

48 minutes ago, RagingGrandpa said:

On smooth asphalt in a quiet area, especially with walls or trees alongside to reflect the sound... yes, notable tread buzz with C-186.

It’s funny though, the knobs are tight enough to make it almost a whine instead of a buzz, especially when nearing 40km/h. Like a small race car engine!

 

48 minutes ago, RagingGrandpa said:

You, sir, need torque pegs / power pads / shin blocks

Oh, he absolutely does! To truly command the MSX they are a must, front and back!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, RagingGrandpa said:
4 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

What's the biggest risk?  Command Authority!  When? unseen soft spots such as mud with grass over it, or snow-drift spots.   Basically cruising along at 10 mph and suddenly hit mud without noticing it... the wheel can do the mud but takes much more tilt as though the rider is 100 lbs heavier. 

You, sir, need torque pegs / power pads / shin blocks / whatever it takes to put something in contact with your shin to increase the torque command when it tries to launch you off the front with unexpected deceleration ;)

Yes!  I've not heard of torque pegs - got any more pics, anybody selling or is it custom?  I extended the pedals on my e+, that's pretty good... On my MSX I have the bigger Nikola pedals that are still too short (Chinese have smaller feet I guess).  So I've considered extending them by about 4 inches to the front with maybe a 1" block at the front so my feet can't just slide off. 

1 hour ago, mrelwood said:

Your tire sounds like a very different one than the harsh knobby I tried on a 16X. The vibration and resistance grew so strong before 30km/h that I didn’t have the guts to push through. The owner must’ve had a very high pressure in it, or the tire is just very different.

It’s funny though, the knobs are tight enough to make it almost a whine instead of a buzz, especially when nearing 40km/h. Like a small race car engine!

Oh, he absolutely does! To truly command the MSX they are a must, front and back!

My tire is the most aggressive knobby I've seen and its fully fast thanks to smaller diameter than stock.  What you described as vibration-resistance is similar to what I felt with the bigger SR244 knobby.  Engineering wise it appears to be more about the command authority (the 2.5-14" is 18.75", vs stock is 19" diameter, vs SR244's 20.5" dia.), than the tire-friction.  Smaller dia = more responsive, easier to reach upper speeds.  Note the diameter effects the actual speed too.  The 19" stock 30 mph becomes 32 mph with the SR244, or 29.7 with the smaller knobby.

BTW, I just ordered these studs:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/293353114765

{+ updates} The slow-turning action is also helped by reduced diameter (with proper inflation).  Additionally, I've noticed I can get more slow-turn-twist by coupling it with a momentary slow-down.  Reminds me of seeing someone (speedy-feat?) doing 180-180-180-180 in rapid succession with quite a lean to it. 

Edited by Elliott Reitz
clarify tire comparison, +updates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

Yes!  I've not heard of torque pegs - got any more pics, anybody selling or is it custom?

I guess EUC Guy is still the only one selling a finished product for the MSX. Many of us fiddle with dense foam (like yoga mat or such) and double-sided adhesive or hook&loop system like the 3M Dual Lock, and we just decide to tolerate the unfinished looks because the stability add-on they give is huge enough.

 

3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

I've considered extending them by about 4 inches to the front with maybe a 1" block at the front so my feet can't just slide off. 

I don’t think there is reason to go beyond the distance your shoes’ toe end naturally reaches. For me it was 6cm IIRC, and going beyond that would make them grab bushes, rocks, and even ground in tight places way too easily for me. And you wouldn’t be standing there anyway.

Also, even a 2” extension needs to be of a very rigid material, so to keep the height of the pedal at a reasonable height for the pedals to fold up, I don’t even know how 4” could be done. A persons weight is a lot to carry on a free floating piece of material.

And I would skip the front blocks. There are a lot of situations where you’d want an easy way out. To trip on a 1” obstacle can be the difference between a run-off and a severe faceplant. Instead, cover your pedals with a 40-grit waterproof sanding sheet and all skateboard grips will start to feel like a joke.

3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

My tire is the most aggressive knobby I've seen and its fully fast thanks to smaller diameter than stock.  What you described as vibration-resistance is similar to what I felt with the bigger SR244 knobby.

Your description sounds a bit different though. The monstrous 16X had no problem getting to accelerate at slow speeds or standstill, which a large tire diameter does. But it was really the physical vibration that seemed to cause enough resistance (vibration of the rubber due to the knobs hitting hard ground I presume) at certain speed.

If the 16X didn’t have had the power delivery issues for heavier people I might’ve been ready to push it a bit further, but my senses were quite sensitive to all reactions, as I really didn’t want to experience my first faceplant that day.

 

3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

BTW, I just ordered these studs:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/293353114765

I have that same thin profile, but overall 3mm shorter. I’d expect zero issues with a motocross tire though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mrelwood said:

I guess EUC Guy is still the only one selling a finished product for the MSX. Many of us fiddle with dense foam (like yoga mat or such) and double-sided adhesive or hook&loop system like the 3M Dual Lock, and we just decide to tolerate the unfinished looks because the stability add-on they give is huge enough.

I don’t think there is reason to go beyond the distance your shoes’ toe end naturally reaches. For me it was 6cm IIRC, and going beyond that would make them grab bushes, rocks, and even ground in tight places way too easily for me. And you wouldn’t be standing there anyway.

Also, even a 2” extension needs to be of a very rigid material, so to keep the height of the pedal at a reasonable height for the pedals to fold up, I don’t even know how 4” could be done. A persons weight is a lot to carry on a free floating piece of material.

And I would skip the front blocks. There are a lot of situations where you’d want an easy way out. To trip on a 1” obstacle can be the difference between a run-off and a severe faceplant. Instead, cover your pedals with a 40-grit waterproof sanding sheet and all skateboard grips will start to feel like a joke.

 

Looks like https://www.eucguy.com/ is out of the power pads for now.

In this vid at 7sec in you can see my left foot has the shoe-laces even with the front of the pedal.  So that's about 2" right there.  So I figure an inch beynd that with something in front of my foot would help.  Rather than being tripped-off, I've slidden off the front tooo many times.  Though considering what would likely work for tripped-up scenarios, more authority via pads will probably be a better solution. 

 

1 hour ago, mrelwood said:

And I would skip the front blocks. There are a lot of situations where you’d want an easy way out. To trip on a 1” obstacle can be the difference between a run-off and a severe faceplant. Instead, cover your pedals with a 40-grit waterproof sanding sheet and all skateboard grips will start to feel like a joke.

Well maybe just a few screws to catch my boot-slides.  Good idea w/ 40-grit too, better than skateboard stuff.  Snow makes it very slippery.  So if I do fabricate pedals they would feature big open holes (I think Z10s have that). 

 

1 hour ago, mrelwood said:

Your description sounds a bit different though. The monstrous 16X had no problem getting to accelerate at slow speeds or standstill, which a large tire diameter does. But it was really the physical vibration that seemed to cause enough resistance (vibration of the rubber due to the knobs hitting hard ground I presume) at certain speed.

If the 16X didn’t have had the power delivery issues for heavier people I might’ve been ready to push it a bit further, but my senses were quite sensitive to all reactions, as I really didn’t want to experience my first faceplant that day.

Added tire friction per knobby reduces the power-margin just like larger diameter.  For me (185 lbs), the smaller diameter (1/4" vs stock) makes up for the knob-friction.  

 

1 hour ago, mrelwood said:

 

I have that same thin profile (tire-studs), but overall 3mm shorter. I’d expect zero issues with a motocross tire though!

 

(re: studs)  Bummer, I made a mistake in the purchase, thought I bought the 9mms, but checking .... ooops. So thanks for commenting - that I noticed.  My knobs are only 6mm.  So 9mm studs have 1mm exposed... so as long as the tire itself is 2mm think these will work.

So re-purchase the right ones.  https://www.ebay.com/itm/223445606490

Edited by Elliott Reitz
EUC guy ref

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

more authority via pads will probably be a better solution.

Granted, your video shows quite sifferent conditions than I thought of... (”Hey, don’t pee on my wheel!!!” :roflmao:) But properly thick sidepad risers might indeed do wonders.

For slipping in those conditions, the snow tends to pack between the pedal and your boot, which will quickly make even the 40-grit redundant. Studs/screws are the only thing that will truly help then. If you too make an additional oversized pedal top plate, it’s easy enough to put in a few screws as well. But I’d start with just a few mm exposed, as they will really grab your shoe!

 

3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

So re-purchase the right ones.  https://www.ebay.com/itm/223445606490

There you go! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, mrelwood said:

I don’t think there is reason to go beyond the distance your shoes’ toe end naturally reaches. [...] And you wouldn’t be standing there anyway.

You may want to be able to utilize an asymmetric stance, in which case any distance one can spread comfortably with the legs would be eligible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mono said:

You may want to be able to utilize an asymmetric stance, in which case any distance one can spread comfortably with the legs would be eligible.

I have slowly been increasing my asymmetric stance, and still think that at least the frontmost inch or so under the shoe can’t really be utilized anyway. All shoes are even shaped a bit like that, with a rising front end.

Unless one completely lifts off the heel. Which I’d consider to be more rare and less useful than to not have the humongous pedals catching on rocks, curbs, and bushes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Mono said:

You may want to be able to utilize an asymmetric stance, in which case any distance one can spread comfortably with the legs would be eligible.

Since most of my riding is < 10 mph with hour-long-durations I've learned to shift my stance alot.  L-heal/R-toe, switch... steep spots with 1 foot fwd, 1 foot back, etc.   Though that's not a solution to hitting a soft-spot like muddy-grass. 

The reality is that my stance with both-feet balanced on my oversized Nikola pedals aligs to my shoe-laces. So moving a foot forward of that is useless.   As for moving a foot back it helps just a little in that my "nutural stance" has the heel of my boots even with the back of the peddles.  So heel hangin off still gets a bit more leverage as long as I'm not barefoot or wearing soft shoes.  Boots have a shank that extends to a point, but not enough in the front. 

So I need pedal extensions on the MSX.  I already created them on the e+ and its a huge help!

20190718_155824rc.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...