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Which BIG wheel has the MOST TORQUE?

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Elliott Reitz said:

It would be cool if anyone would actually test their wheel torque.  How? 

1. Get a hanging scale, eg: https://www.ebay.com/itm/500kg-1100-LBS-Digital-Hanging-Scale-Heavy-Industrial-Crane-Scale-W-LCD-SCREEN/201359235679?hash=item2ee1f21a5f:g:cE4AAOSwdzxdl-eu

2. tie it to both foot plates and a parked vehicle. 

3. use a pair of crow-bars to pry down on the front of the foot plates

4. Observe max static force on the scale.

5. Convert the force from lbs to motor torque in ft-lbs by proportioning it to the wheel radius.  For example, if its a 19" wheel, the radius is 9.5".  So multiply the force by (12/9.5) to get ft-lbs.

In real world usage it wouldn’t matter. It takes technique to bring out torque, to tap into more potential torque then a straight lean, whether from a standstill or a rolling start. A standing straight lean would either faceplant you or leave you in the dust from someone technical. @houseofjob has been preaching about technique for a while 

Edited by Darrell Wesh

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Darrell Wesh said:

In real world usage it wouldn’t matter. It takes technique to bring out torque, to tap into more potential torque then a straight lean, whether from a standstill or a rolling start. A standing straight lean would either faceplant you or leave you in the dust from someone technical. @houseofjob has been preaching about technique for a while 

This torque argument is funny :lol:

Most riders don't realize the "standard", Frankenstein-planted-feet-then-lean-forward doesn't tap into anywhere near the max torque of a wheel, as your body weight is primarily down your heels, which is a brake, hence the need for something different in technique. The whole pad-up-tug-and-superman fad going around seems to be guys seeking to cheat this, but comes at a price in safety because you still have no back-leaning leverage/stability from bumps and other unexpected falling type scenarios.

Edited by houseofjob

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5 hours ago, xorbe said:

But that completely misses measuring torque at anything above 0 kph.

0 to 3 mph is where I most want torque.  Also, there are major difference in "mode" of "hard/medium/soft" among wheels.  And my old e+ seems pretty torque-y compared to the MSX.  ;)

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57 minutes ago, Elliott Reitz said:

And my old e+ seems pretty torque-y compared to the MSX.  ;)

Torque is a different measure than the required amount of effort.

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On 5/19/2020 at 8:07 PM, mrelwood said:

Torque is a different measure than the required amount of effort.

Exactly why I posted above... this:

It would be cool if anyone would actually test their wheel torque.  How? 

  1. Get a hanging scale, eg: https://www.ebay.com/itm/500kg-1100-LBS-Digital-Hanging-Scale-Heavy-Industrial-Crane-Scale-W-LCD-SCREEN/201359235679?hash=item2ee1f21a5f:g:cE4AAOSwdzxdl-eu
  2. tie it to both foot plates and a parked vehicle. 
  3. use a pair of crow-bars to pry down on the front of the foot plates
  4. Observe max static force on the scale.
  5. Convert the force from lbs to motor torque in ft-lbs by proportioning it to the wheel radius.  For example, if its a 19" wheel, the radius is 9.5".  So multiply the force by (12/9.5) to get ft-lbs.

Otherwise, nobody can truly tell because the command authority needed interacts with riding style as well as power-pads, heel-grab, etc.  And then there are different power ratings etc.  People couldn't even tell torque diff between 84V and 100V MSX... it was a long thread that was never definitively answered.  Here we are again. 

Since I don't want to risk popping any FETS in either of my wheels I will defer to the opinions here without any real facts on display. ;)

 

 

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On 5/19/2020 at 7:08 PM, Elliott Reitz said:

0 to 3 mph is where I most want torque.  Also, there are major difference in "mode" of "hard/medium/soft" among wheels.  And my old e+ seems pretty torque-y compared to the MSX.  ;)

Technique can get you that torque. Almost done with my video on this pivotal phase of acceleration.

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Maybe slightly off topic but why is there not third party dyno testing of these wheels? Quick search online and there seem to be a few DIY builds being done with Arduinos. Cant be any harder to build a dyno for the EUC than to change its tire. Maybe its the cost vs a new wheel dilemma. I'd throw a few bucks at a gofundme to see accurate info. Anybody else?

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6 hours ago, petaluma said:

Maybe slightly off topic but why is there not third party dyno testing of these wheels? Quick search online and there seem to be a few DIY builds being done with Arduinos. Cant be any harder to build a dyno for the EUC than to change its tire. Maybe its the cost vs a new wheel dilemma. I'd throw a few bucks at a gofundme to see accurate info. Anybody else?

It could also estimate range for different weight riders, speed cut offs and battery throttling percentage. With a little extra work it could also give a figure for comfort. If you didn't mind risking damaging the wheel then you could have an additional test for waterproofing.   

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On 6/1/2020 at 8:53 PM, petaluma said:

Maybe slightly off topic but why is there not third party dyno testing of these wheels? Quick search online and there seem to be a few DIY builds being done with Arduinos. Cant be any harder to build a dyno for the EUC than to change its tire. Maybe its the cost vs a new wheel dilemma. I'd throw a few bucks at a gofundme to see accurate info. Anybody else?

Thank you.  This is same as my concept using a spring scale to measure 0mph torque.  And yea, its the new wheel dilemma or I would have done the spring-scale-test.

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