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Hey all, nabbed a Z10 back in October and have been happily shortcutting urban transportation since. I recently checked the app and realized I've put 1000 miles on the wheel! 
I thought I'd ask if there is anything I should think about tuning up or checking out after this much mileage. The wheel is working great, and I'd love to make sure it stays that way.

Any tips or advice?

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Theres not really much you can 'service' to be honest. A very close visual inspection of the tyre for any embedded objects/cuts would be the most important one. You could go further and remove the side panels. One will cover the battery so you could just check the two power connectors and white BMS connector to make sure they are firmly closed home. The other side will cover the mother and power boards (which are under a further cover). You could check that all wiring appears in order and there are no signs of overheating on any of the components. The battery and motor wires are held down by crosshead screws - you could check these are still tight although I would simply advise checking that the white paint covering the heads hasn't moved rather than trying to tighten them as this will break the white paint seal and you will then have to seal them again. It acts as a kind of locktite but even better IMO because you can see at a glance whether there has been any movement.

A good tool for checking damaged electrical components is the Mk1 human nose. Any burnt/acrid smell is a dead giveaway, and most overheated electrics will give this smell.

TBH I found the electrics in my Z to be very well laid out, insulated and generally very professional looking. Ninebot really did a good job (discounting the earlier wheels which had problems with overheated hall resistors... ;)

You could also try and firmly move the wheel left to right and up to down whilst holding the body very still to try and feel for any play in the wheel bearings.

Other than that, just ride! The closeness of our senses to the wheel when riding EUC's will usually pick up anything untoward anyway. Hopefully that's before a crash develops though.

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55 minutes ago, Planemo said:

Theres not really much you can 'service' to be honest. A very close visual inspection of the tyre for any embedded objects/cuts would be the most important one. You could go further and remove the side panels. One will cover the battery so you could just check the two power connectors and white BMS connector to make sure they are firmly closed home. The other side will cover the mother and power boards (which are under a further cover). You could check that all wiring appears in order and there are no signs of overheating on any of the components. The battery and motor wires are held down by crosshead screws - you could check these are still tight although I would simply advise checking that the white paint covering the heads hasn't moved rather than trying to tighten them as this will break the white paint seal and you will then have to seal them again. It acts as a kind of locktite but even better IMO because you can see at a glance whether there has been any movement.

A good tool for checking damaged electrical components is the Mk1 human nose. Any burnt/acrid smell is a dead giveaway, and most overheated electrics will give this smell.

TBH I found the electrics in my Z to be very well laid out, insulated and generally very professional looking. Ninebot really did a good job (discounting the earlier wheels which had problems with overheated hall resistors... ;)

You could also try and firmly move the wheel left to right and up to down whilst holding the body very still to try and feel for any play in the wheel bearings.

Other than that, just ride! The closeness of our senses to the wheel when riding EUC's will usually pick up anything untoward anyway. Hopefully that's before a crash develops though.

@Planemo great thoughts. I actually am slightly familiar with the inside as I had to replace a fried motherboard awhile back. Scary experience but what beautiful internals!

Might be worth giving the inside a look. I strain this thing on Seattle hills constantly. 

I can’t imagine replacing the bearing is a very straightforward process if and when it comes to that..

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18 minutes ago, dantaylr said:

I can’t imagine replacing the bearing is a very straightforward process if and when it comes to that..

You're right it is a bit griefy. I think Roberace did it but yes it's a total stripdown and access to a press is required. Thankfully it's not a job that has to be done often! I have only heard of one person needing to do it and he had a lot of kms on the wheel! The bearings are cheap though, and the press job won't cost much at a machine shop so it's just your time really in stripping it all down.

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